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VTE and Cancer
 
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Blood clots are a common problem for people living with cancer. About 1 in 200 cancer patients develop a blood clot, though the risk of getting a blood clot is not the same in all people with cancer. The symptoms of blood clots can sometimes be subtle, and can be confused with other conditions that cause similar symptoms. This patient video produced by Mike Evan’s Lab and authored by Thrombosis Canada members, Agnes Lee and Marc Carrier, discusses the signs and symptoms of blood clots in cancer patients and the available treatment options.
Views: 2865 ThrombosisCanada
Grand Rounds: Cancer Thrombosis with Dr. Rojan
 
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In this evidence-fueled talk, Dr. Adam Rojan covers the hypercoagulability associated with cancer, risk assessment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients and treatment/prophylaxis for VTE in cancer patients. Some items in this lecture may have come from the lecturer’s personal academic files or have been cited in-line or at the end of the lecture. For more information, see our citation page. You may see our blog archive for more lectures. Disclaimers ©2015 LouisvilleLectures.org
Oncologic Emergencies: Venous Thromboembolism
 
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Venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism are common in cancer patients. In this video I discuss the underlying pathophysiology of these conditions.
Views: 4536 Andrew Wolf
VTE Prevention in Cancer Patients - Alok A. Khorana, MD
 
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VTE Prevention in Cancer Patients Alok A. Khorana, MD University of Rochester North American Thrombosis Forum (NATF) Hospital DVT Prophylaxis Strategies April 29, 2011 Boston, MA
Views: 1048 NAThrombosisForum
Edoxaban for Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolism
 
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Daily injection with low-molecular-weight heparin is the recommended treatment for cancer-associated venous thromboembolism; the safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants have not been established. New research findings are summarized in this short video. Full study: http://nej.md/2B733Bk Watch more Quick Take videos: http://nej.md/quick-take
Views: 2842 NEJMvideo
VTE: Is There Cancer?
 
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The Consult Guys bring a new perspective to the art and science of medicine with lively discussion and analysis of real-world cases and situations. This episode: "VTE: Is There Cancer?
Rivaroxaban in Cancer-Associated VTE: Results from CALLISTO
 
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Alok Khorana, MD, talks about results from the CALLISTO trial and the need for new treatments for cancer patients with venous thromboembolism.
VTE and Cancer (Discussion) | Gregory Piazza, MD, MS
 
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VTE and Cancer (Discussion) Gregory Piazza, MD, MS NATF Thrombosis Summit 2013 September 28, 2013 Boston, MA http://www.natfonline.org
Views: 66 NAThrombosisForum
How is cancer-related venous thromboembolism treated in real world practice?
 
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Prof Khorana talks to ecancertv at ASH 2015 about current practice patterns and patient persistence on anticoagulant treatments for cancer-associated thrombosis. In the interview he describes a study that looked at almost 3,000 patients with cancer who were newly diagnosed venous thromboembolism (VTE) and had received anticoagulant treatment in the outpatient setting. Guidelines recommend that 3–6 months of a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) be given, but it is not clear if this should be continued beyond 6 months. In this real-world practice setting 25% of patients were treated with a LMWH and 18.7% received LMWH or warfarin. A further 29% had been given warfarin and 24.1% had been given the newer oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban. On average the median duration of treatment was 3.29 months for LMWH, 7.76 months for LMWH/warfarin, 8.12 months for warfarin, and 7.92 months for rivaroxaban. Persistence to the initial therapy were a respective 37%, 60%, 62%, and 61% at 6 months, dropping to 21%, 37%, 34%, and 36% at 12 months. In addition more patients initially taking LMWH were found to have switched to another anticoagulant compared to patients who had been started on warfarin or rivaroxaban.
Views: 87 ecancer
The burden of VTE in cancer patients: impacts and novel treatments
 
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Venous thromboembolism (VTE) effects 20% of all cancer patients. In this interview with Cihan Ay, MD, from the Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, discusses the occurrence and implications of VTE in cancer patients compared to those without cancer. The discussion covers identification techniques, management strategies and novel therapies for VTE. This video was recorded the British Society for Haematology (BSH) 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting, held in Liverpool, UK.
ASH 2017: Gary E. Raskob: Edoxaban vs. Dalteparin for VTE in Cancer: Hokusai VTE-Cancer Study
 
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LBA-6 A[nbsp]Gary E. Raskob, Nick Van Es, Peter Verhamme, Marc Carrier, et al.[nbsp]A Randomized, Open-Label, Blinded Outcome Assessment Trial Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of LMWH/Edoxaban Versus Dalteparin for Venous Thromboembolism Associated with Cancer: Hokusai VTE-Cancer Study Presented at the ASH 2017 Late-Breaking Abstracts Press Briefing - December 11, 2017
Views: 919 oncoletter
Edoxaban versus dalteparin for venous thromboembolism associated with cancer
 
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Dr Büller speaks with ecancer at the 2017 ASH annual meeting about a randomised, open-label, blinded outcome assessment trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of LMWH/edoxaban versus dalteparin for venous thromboembolism associated with cancer. He details the balance of disease recurrence and bleeding in trial groups, noting the improved treatment adherence among those taking a daily pill in place of subcutaneous injection, and the planned sensitivity assessments for the trial. Overall, Dr Büller describes these results as practice-changing, and encourages doctors and patients to consider their use. ecancer's filming has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ECMS Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content.
Views: 307 ecancer
2.0 Upper DVT in cancer patients
 
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second part of 2 International RIETE Meeting. UPPER DVT in cancer patients
ASH Highlights 2016 – Costs Associated with VTE in Cancer Patients Treated with Anticoagulants
 
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Michael Streiff, MD discusses the results of a study regarding VTE-Related Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Associated with VTE in Cancer Patients Treated with Different Anticoagulants.
Views: 48 Thrombosis.TV
Dalteparin thromboprophylaxis for cancer patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism
 
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Prof Khorana talks to ecancertv at ASH 2015 about a randomised trial looking at the outpatient use of dalteparin for the prevention of thrombosis in cancer patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Several years ago Dr Khorana and colleagues developed an algorithm for assessing how likely patients with cancer were to develop VTE while being treated with chemotherapy. This takes into account several factors such as the site of the cancer, the platelet and leukocyte counts before chemotherapy is given, the level of haemoglobin and the patient’s body mass index. In the current trial, patients with a high risk for VTE (Khorana score ≥3) who were initiating a new systemic chemotherapy regimen were screened for VTE, If negative for VTE, patients were randomised to either self-inject the low molecular weight heparin dalteparin daily or to no prophylactic anticoagulation for 12 weeks. Thromboprophylaxis versus no thromboprophylaxis was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of VTE and rates of major bleeding and overall survival were similar. There was an increased risk of clinically relevant bleeding, but the study was underpowered. There is a validated risk assessment tool and it can be used to find patients at the highest risk that may benefit from anticoagulation with self-injected low-molecular-weight heparin Dr Khorana observes.
Views: 276 ecancer
Venous Thromboembolism in the cancer patients/ Dr Simon Noble
 
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Palliative care & Pain Management Conference/ Day 1 ( 7/11/2012 ) Dr.Simon Noble is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Palliative Medicine at Cardiff University and Honorary Consultant at the Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport. He has research experience in designing and conducting clinical trials, qualitative research and "wet lab" work. Abstract: The association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cancer has been recognized for over 140 years, yet optimal management of this complex condition has only been realized within the past decade. Up to fifteen percent of cancer patients will experience VTE during their cancer journey and the thrombotic risk appears to increase with disease progress. The cancer patient with VTE poses particular challenges in their management since they have an increased risk of bleeding and recurrent thrombosis on anticoagulation compared to the non cancer population. Also, as the disease progresses, so do the hazards of anticoagulation and patients in the palliative stages of their cancer could be viewed as a separate disease group with respect to diagnosis and management? As the focus from curative treatment moves towards symptom control, physicians face several challenges in providing the most appropriate care for their patients. The focus of cancer associated care has historically been on the treatment and prevention of further thromboses. However, there is increasing recognition that the efficacy of therapies needs to be reviewed alongside the impact of treatments on quality of life. Palliative care patients have rarely been included in research on VTE and the supporting evidence needs to be extrapolated cautiously. Quality of life aspects of VTE and their management may be a more appropriate outcome measure in this stage of disease than radiological end points. This presentation paper looks at the challenges facing professionals in the management of VTE in the advanced cancer patient with particular emphasis on the patient experience during their disease journey.
Top Developments in Anticoagulant - Anticoagulation in DVT/PE (Heart&Stroke Clinical Update/Pai)
 
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Heart & Stroke Clinical Update 2015 Plenary 3b Top Developments in Anticoagulant - Anticoagulation in DVT/PE Presented by: Menaka Pai, MSc, MD, FRCPC (see below) Hilton Toronto, December 2015 Learning Objectives 1. Understand the impact of VTE 2. Learn about the current options to treat acute VTE (and their individual challenges) 3. Compare different strategies for extended duration treatment of VTE Session Description Acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). VTE is a common disease, affecting approximately 1-2 in 1,000 adults per year. Both in the short term and in the long term, VTE is highly morbid. Approximately one third of patients with DVT develop symptomatic PE, while one third suffer from post-thrombotic syndrome. Patients with PE are at increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. A single episode of VTE also confers an increased risk of recurrent thrombosis. For patients who present with acute VTE, the previous standard of care was initial treatment with a parenteral anticoagulant followed by oral vitamin K antagonist; treatment choice was limited. However there are now a number of approved therapies for the treatment of DVT and PE. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been shown to be effective for acute treatment. The availability of these agents has given healthcare providers and patients more choice, and DOACs offer a number of advantages over oral vitamin K antagonists . Yet it is important to understand the unique characteristics and challenges of the DOACs, to ensure patients receive appropriate individualized treatment. Recent studies have looked beyond acute treatment of VTE, to explore the role of the DOACs as well as aspirin to prevent recurrent thrombosis. The duration of anticoagulation should also be individualized; healthcare providers must carefully weigh the individual patient’s risk of bleeding versus their risk of thrombosis, and consider the values and preferences that go into decisions about anticoagulation. Menaka Pai, MSc, MD, FRCPC Assistant Professor - Hematology & Thromboembolism, Department of Medicine, McMaster University Associate Member - Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University The following information was provided by speakers at the Clinical Update 2015. The information is intended for use by healthcare professionals for reference and education only and is not intended to be a substitute for a physician's advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should consult your physician for personal health matters.
Views: 2435 Heart and Stroke
Measurement of Thrombin Generation:Predictive Biomarker of VTE in Cancer Patients
 
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At ASH 2015, Dr. Anna Falanga from Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII discussed her abstract titled "Measurement of Thrombin Generation Is a Positive Predictive Biomarker of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) in Metastatic Cancer Patients Enrolled in the Hypercan Study." For more information, visit www.hemonc.tv
Views: 28 HemOnc TV
VTE Burden and Patients at Risk
 
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Dr Ander Cohen uncovers the burden of VTE, including risk factors and the importance of treatment and prevention of VTE for patients
Views: 5085 Thrombosis Adviser
Blood thinners a risk with cancer-associated venous thromboembolism
 
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Dr Lazo-Langner talks with ecancer at EHA 2017 about weighing the risk of bleeding or clotting in cancer patients after a thrombotic event. Looking at data from almost 7000 patients, he identifies a small risk of bleeding among patients linked to a significant increase in mortality. Dr Lazo-Langner considers the approaches necessary to manage bleeding and clotting risks in geriatric oncology, and the overlap of other common drugs with bleed risks, including NSAIDs.
Views: 20 ecancer
Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients with cancer.
 
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Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in ambulatory patients with cancer.
The Hokusai VTE-Cancer Study: objectives and design
 
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What were the objectives of the Hokusai venous thromboembolism (VTE)-Cancer Study? In this interview, Harry Buller, MD, PhD, of the Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands, highlights the major components, objectives and findings of the trial (NCT02073682), which compared two regimens, subcutaneous injection of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and oral administration of edoxaban. Prof. Buller discusses various elements of the trial, including focusing on the composite of first recurrence or the first major bleed from VTE and continuing treatment beyond 6 months. Describing the LMWH treatment as noninferior to oral edoxaban, Prof. Buller explains the advantages of edoxaban for patients with cancer-associated VTE. This video was recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2017 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta, GA.
The Hokusai VTE-Cancer Study: the importance of improving VTE treatment
 
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Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a major risk for patients with cancer. The current standard of care for VTE includes subcutaneously injecting low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), which has shown to be effective; however, patients are required to use this treatment for prolonged periods. In this interview, recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2017 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Atlanta, GA, Harry Buller, MD, PhD, of the Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands, discusses the issues surrounding VTE. Prof. Buller also explains the reasoning behind the Hokusai VTE-Cancer Study (NCT02073682), which compared subcutaneous injection of LMWH vs. oral edoxaban for the treatment of VTE.
Cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE, thrombosis and pulmonary embolism)
 
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VTE is the second cause of mortality in patients with cancer. Prevalence of cancer-VTE is higher and more serious than the combinations of cancer-stroke or cancer-infarction. It's important to know which tumors are involved in VTE and their risks factors
Which cancer patients get blood clots?
 
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Learn more about blood clots and cancer. Click here ➤ http://cancerclot.info/ As Prof. Simon Noble, MD, says, cancer patients have an increased risk of blood clots compared to the general population—mainly because the cancer tumour releases molecules into the blood that can make the blood more sticky. However not all cancers are the same, and not all stages of cancer are the same. Blood from patients with brain, pancreas, lung or ovarian cancer is more prone to form blood clots than that of patients with breast or prostate cancer. If the cancer has spread to other parts of the body—also known as “metastasis”—it can increase the risk of blood clots 19-fold. Also, certain types of chemotherapy further increase the risk. If you have any questions about cancer-related blood clots, please talk to your doctor.
Views: 16155 LEO Pharma Global
Venous Thrombo embolism in Cancer patients
 
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Presentation by Dr Dwideep Chandra at PAN Africa Symposium. Download the presentation ppt slides free at clinicalslides.com for limited time.. http://www.clinicalslides.com/product/venous-thromboembolism-in-cancer-patients/
Views: 47 Clinicalslides.com
Assessing and Addressing the Risk of Developing a Blood Clot in Patients with Cancer
 
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A blood clot, also called venous thromboembolism (VTE), is the second leading cause of death for patients battling cancer. Patients with cancer & their physicians need to be educated and aware of the signs & symptoms of a blood clot. If caught early, VTE can be treated.
Views: 56 UP Creative Group
Recent Findings in Cancer Associated Thrombosis
 
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Dr. Ander Cohen discusses several ISTH posters on cancer associated thrombosis highlighting the incidence, recurrence, and mortality outcomes. These posters are based on a cohort of 3.8 million patients in the UK that have been followed for VTE. What has been shown is that the rates of VTE in cancer are high, specifically in patients with active cancer.
Views: 134 Thrombosis.TV
The use of anticoagulants in cancer-associated venous thromboembolism
 
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Press brief by Alejandro Lazo-Langner, MD, MSc, FRCPC from Western University, London, ON, Canada at the European Hematology Association (EHA) 2017 meeting, held in Madrid, Spain.
Preventing and Treating Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)
 
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Learn more about VTE blood clots at http://www.YouAndBloodClots.com This animation explains the medications and treatments most commonly used for venous thromboembolism (VTE), as well as how they work and how they are taken. The main types of treatments are anticoagulants (also called blood thinners) and thrombolytic therapy (also called clot busters). The use of compression stockings and vena cava filters are also explained.
Views: 5931 You and Blood Clots
Extensive Testing Finds More Cancer in Patients With Unprovoked Deep Vein Thrombosis
 
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Extensive Testing Finds More Cancer in Patients With Unprovoked Deep Vein Thrombosis
Views: 712 medvidblog
Dr. Khorana Discusses Long-Term Tinzaparin Versus Warfarin in the CATCH Study
 
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Alok Khorana, MD, medical oncologist, Cleveland Clinic, discusses the long-term impacts of tinzaparin versus warfarin, as well as clinical predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients, in the CATCH study. The CATCH study is a worldwide, randomized clinical trial of 900 patients with a malignancy and VTE. Half received the low- molecular-weight heparin tinzaparin, and the other half received warfarin. The primary outcome was to determine whether tinzaparin was superior to warfarin, in terms of reducing the risk of recurrent VTE, says Khorana. The study results showed that tinzaparin was indeed superior; it was associated with less bleeding as well.
Views: 184 Targeted Oncology
Dalteparin Thromboprophylaxis in Cancer Patients
 
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Dr. Alok Khorana of the Cleveland Clinic discusses his study on efficacy and safety of dalteparin thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients considered at high risk for venous thromboembolism. The use of risk scoring (Khorana score) to predict patients most at risk is discussed. The use of the Khorana risk scoring algorithm are reviewed. Finally, Dr. Khorana describes new, ongoing studies involving DOACs using risk scoring algorithms. For more oncology news, education, and information, please visit http://www.oncology.tv/
Views: 115 Oncology.TV
Is Extensive Cancer Screening Following Unprovoked VTE Necessary?
 
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Marc Carrier, MD, from the University of Ottawa discusses his late-breaking presentation from ISTH 2015 regarding screening for cancer following unprovoked VTE. This trial of 854 patients randomized to receive age/gender-specific cancer screening only or age/gender-specific screening plus CAT scan of the abdomen and pelvis with virtual colonoscopy and gastroscopy. Patients were followed for 12 months, and overall the prevalence of cancer detection was found to be lower than previously described. Extensive cancer screening following unprovoked VTE was no better at detecting more cancers or detecting missed cancers, and there was no significant difference noted in overall survival or other secondary endpoints between groups. The authors concluded that unprovoked VTE should not warrant extensive screening at this point, and that healthcare resources would be better directed to more high risk patients who require more extensive screening.
Views: 163 Thrombosis.TV
Warfarin, rivaroxaban used almost as frequently as LMWH in patients with cancer-related thrombosis
 
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Alok A. Khorana, MD & Medical Oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic discusses dalteparin thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism: A randomized trial at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition. MDLinx Conference Coverage - 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition: http://www.mdlinx.com/oncology/conference-interview/57th-american-society-of-hematology-annual-meeting-exposition/175528 MDLinx: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Smartest Doc & Board Exam Prep: http://www.thesmartestdoc.com/ M3 USA: http://usa.m3.com/ Follow MDLinx: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MDLinx Twitter - https://twitter.com/MDLinx Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+Mdlinx/
Views: 130 MDLinx
What is cancer-associated thrombosis?
 
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Learn more about blood clots and cancer. Click here ➤ http://cancerclot.info/ Cancer-associated thrombosis, also called cancer-related blood clots, can cause pain and discomfort and, untreated, can have life-threatening consequences, says Prof. Simon Noble, MD. Cancer patients have an increased risk of blood clots compared to the general population—mainly because the cancer tumour releases molecules into the blood that can make the blood more sticky. However not all cancers are the same, and not all stages of cancer are the same. Blood from patients with brain, pancreas, lung or ovarian cancer is more prone to form blood clots than that of patients with breast or prostate cancer. If the cancer has spread to other parts of the body—also known as “metastasis”—it can increase the risk of blood clots 19-fold. Also, certain types of chemotherapy further increase the risk. If you have any questions about cancer-related blood clots, please talk to your doctor.
Views: 4954 LEO Pharma Global
Screen and use thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients at high-risk for venous thromboembolism
 
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Alok A. Khorana, MD & Medical Oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic discusses current practice patterns and patient persistence on anticoagulant treatments for cancer-associated thrombosis at the 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition. MDLinx Conference Coverage - 57th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition: http://www.mdlinx.com/oncology/conference-interview/57th-american-society-of-hematology-annual-meeting-exposition/175528 MDLinx: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Smartest Doc & Board Exam Prep: http://www.thesmartestdoc.com/ M3 USA: http://usa.m3.com/ Follow MDLinx: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MDLinx Twitter - https://twitter.com/MDLinx Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+Mdlinx/
Views: 13 MDLinx
Following Thromboprophylaxis Guidelines in Cancer Patients-the Real World
 
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Marc Carrier, MD, from the University of Ottawa talks about an evaluation of thromboprophylaxis guidelines for patients with cancer in the real-world setting. The risk/benefit of thromboprophylaxis is not well understood in cancer patients. This evaluation describes the prevalence of thromboprophylaxis use across three institutions in Canada. The study found that only 35% of appropriate patients receiving thromboprophylaxis as recommended by guidelines, and those that did receive it had a relatively small risk of major bleeding. This data should be reassuring to clinicians concerned about a patient’s bleeding risk when anticoagulants are dosed properly. The study also found that there may even be room increase the anticoagulant dose for thromboprophylaxis. Event rates for VTE rates were found to be high, but no difference was noted between groups.
Views: 56 Thrombosis.TV
PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM IN AMBULATORY PATIENTS WITH CANCER
 
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JOSE DANIEL GUERRERO MONCAYO SEMESTRE C - MEDICINA INGLES MEDICO II 2DO PARCIAL
Views: 29 karla calderom
Deep Vein Thrombosis and Cancer What are the Risks?
 
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For Advice about Deep Vein Thrombosis, Varicose Veins, Thread Veins and other leg vein problems Tel 01935 873 951 http://theveincarecentre.co.uk/ http://www.theveincarecentre.co.uk/contact info@theveincarecentre.co.uk https://www.facebook.com/theveincarecentre https://www.iwantgreatcare.org/doctors/dr-haroun-gajraj I recently saw a patient from Poole in Dorset who came to see me after a deep vein thrombosis wondering whether he needed any tests. Well he was in his 60s so I had some unpalatable news for him -- as his deep vein thrombosis was unprovoked he should have tests to check that he does not have cancer. So what exactly do I mean by "unprovoked"? Well this is a deep vein thrombosis that comes apparently out of the blue. That means that in the preceding 3 months before the development of the deep vein thrombosis there has been no evidence of major surgery major trauma there has been no immobility so the person has not been bedridden or has spent a significant part of the day either in bed or in a chair the person is not pregnant and the person is not taking hormone replacement therapy or the oral contraceptive pill. Now if a deep vein thrombosis is unprovoked and the person is under 40 then they should have as a bare minimum a full examination a chest x-ray some screening blood tests and their urine should be analysed. Now if the person is over the age of 40 and has an unprovoked deep vein thrombosis then they should be fully investigated for cancer. And that means a mammogram in a woman is and in both men and women a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Now I don't want to cause alarm but approximately 10% of people who have an unprovoked deep-vein thrombosis then find that they have a cancer within the next 12 months. Now they probably had the cancer it's only just become apparent with time. And we know if you diagnose cancer early you get better results. So screening people with an unprovoked deep vein thrombosis gives a really good opportunity to diagnose a cancer at an early stage when it might well be treatable and perhaps be life-saving. So please do not be alarmed but if you have had a deep vein thrombosis which has apparently come out of the blue you ought to see your doctor. If you are over the age of 40 I think now it is probably best that you are referred to a haematologist in a hospital. He is a specialist who can assess your risks and perform the appropriate investigations. Here is the link to the NICE guidance on this matter which came out a year ago and I hope you find it useful. http://publications.nice.org.uk/venous-thromboembolic-diseases-the-management-of-venous-thromboembolic-diseases-and-the-role-of-cg144/guidance I hope you have enjoyed watching this video. If you have do please remember to click the box above -- that way you will subscribe and you will be amongst the 1st to see my next video. I would really like to hear from you so if you would like to leave a comment in the box below please do so -- I'll get back to you soon as I can. Thank you for watching my video.
Views: 2012 The VeinCare Centre
To reduce VTE recurrence, keep patients with active cancers on anticoagulation therapy
 
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Alok A. Khorana, MD, Vice-chairman, Taussig Cancer Institute, Director, gastrointestinal cancer, discusses duration of anticoagulant therapy and VTE recurrence in patients with cancer. MDLinx Conference Coverage -American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 Annual Meeting: http://www.mdlinx.com/oncology/conference-interview/american-society-of-clinical-oncology-2016-annual-meeting/231386 MDLinx: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Smartest Doc & Board Exam Prep: http://www.thesmartestdoc.com/ M3 USA: http://usa.m3.com/ Follow MDLinx: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MDLinx Twitter - https://twitter.com/MDLinx Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+Mdlinx/
Views: 23 MDLinx
About Thrombosis and Cancer
 
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Thrombosis and Cancer: Sylvia Haas provides a summary of the Cancer section of ThrombosisAdvisor.com. Discover why patients with cancer have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and what can be done about it.
Views: 588 Thrombosis Adviser
CME: Best Practices in Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Prophylaxis
 
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Applying the Guidelines to Patients with Cancer Module: "The best estimates indicate that 350,000O to 600,000 Americans each year suffer from DVT and PE, and that at least 100,000 deaths may be directly or indirectly to these diseases." (The Surgeons General's Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism 2008). One fifth of all these VTE events occur in patients with cancer. Point of fact...cancer-associated thrombosis is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer after cancer itself. In addition to the association with mortality, there are other serious consequences of VTE in the cancer patient....blood clots and bleeding complications. While guidelines for the prevention/prophylaxis VTE have existed since 1986 multiple studies, that have included hospital medical record audits, demonstrate underuse of VTE prophylaxis. Up to 2/3 of patients with hospital-acquired VTE did not receive appropriate prophylaxis. City of Hope DVT/PE Diagnosis Analysis-January 2007 -- June 2009 demonstrate variations in care and delivery of care that have deviations is in practice compared with evidence-based recommendations for VTE prophylaxis. This live educational intervention is the first in a series of educational interventions to mitigate this performance practice gap at the City of Hope. Release date: March 30, 2010 A City of Hope Continuing Medical Education e-Learning Module To obtain CME credit and learn more about this module, visit http://cityofhope.org/education/cme/e-learning/best-practices-in-venous-thromboembolism-prophylaxis To learn more about City of Hope Continuing Medical Education, visit http://cityofhope.org/cme To view more CME modules, go to http://www.cityofhope.org/education/cme/e-learning ###################### CONNECT WITH CITY OF HOPE http://www.facebook.com/cityofhope http://www.twitter.com/cityofhope http://www.causes.com/cityofhope and more at http://www.cityofhope.org/getsocial ABOUT CITY OF HOPE City of Hope is a leading medical research, treatment and education center dedicated to preventing, treating and curing cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Our mission is to quickly turn research ideas into cures that help save patients' lives all over the world. Learn more at http://www.cityofhope.org.
Views: 3803 City of Hope
Treatment of blood clots in cancer patients
 
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Learn more about blood clots and cancer. Click here ➤ http://cancerclot.info/ Treatment of a venous blood clot should always be prescribed by a doctor. The recommended treatment for cancer patients with a blood clot are daily injections with a type of blood thinning medicine called low molecular weight heparin. Low molecular weight heparin is dosed as subcutaneous injections, administered under the skin through a thin needle, like when diabetes patients are treated with insulin. The injection is most often administered once a day. The doctor decides on the correct dose based on the body weight of the patient. The syringes are simple to use and patients or their relatives can learn how to perform the injections on their own through instructions from health care professionals. The medication makes the blood less prone to clotting. When treatment is started, the blood clot will cease to grow, and in time, the body will dissolve the blood clot, usually over a number of months. As the blood´s ability to clot is reduced by the medication, there is a risk of developing a major bleeding if subjected to trauma. For the majority of cancer patients, the benefits of the treatment outweigh the risk of bleeding and the symptoms from the blood clot disappear in time . The blood thinning treatment does not have any influence on the cancer treatment. Your doctor will perform regular checkups and decide whether you can stop or should continue your treatment. This decision depends on your cancer disease, whether you still receive active treatment for your cancer and how well you are reacting to the blood thinning treatment. It is important to continue with your treatment until the doctor tells you to stop. Otherwise, there is a risk of developing new blood clots. If you have any questions regarding cancer related venous blood clots please talk to your doctor.
Views: 1744 LEO Pharma Global
Improving Quality of VTE Care
 
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Simon Mantha, MD, MPH, discusses the safety and efficacy of using rivaroxaban among patients with cancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease.