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SWFWMD Votes to Establish Water Cooperative for Polk County (Part 1)
 
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http://floridawaterdaily.com. The Governing Board Approves a plan to create a water supply entity for Polk County and the local municipalities. Video provided by the Southwest Florida Water Management District.
SWFWMD Votes to Establish Water Cooperative for Polk County (Part 2)
 
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http://floridawaterdaily.com. The Governing Board Approves a plan to create a water supply entity for Polk County and the local municipalities. Video provided by the Southwest Florida Water Management District.
SWFWMD - FDACS IRRIGATION FOLLIES 1
 
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Spray Irrigation on Oct 10, 2012 at M.D. Council & Sons, 2910 Gulf City Rd, Ruskin FL. Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems (FARMS) project H520 is located in the Most Impacted Area (MIA) of the Southern Water Use Caution Area (SWUCA). FARMS project H520 received a $96,445 government subsidy for an upgraded irrigation system due to the implemented water quantity Best Management Practices (BMPs) from the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) and the Florida Department of Agricultural and Consumer Services (FDACS). The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) approved Irrigation Water Management Plan states "The irrigation system shall be operated in a manner not to cause runoff or erosion" See video from Oct 18, 2013 at http://youtu.be/br4uciIlaiI
Southwest Florida Water Management District - Jobs
 
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http://tampabay.jobing.com Southwest Florida Water Management District otherwise known as SWFWMD encompasses roughly 10,000 square miles in all or part of 16 counties and serves a population of more than 5 million people. The goal of the District is to meet the water needs of current and future water users while protecting and preserving the water resources within its boundaries. Watch to find out more about what Southwest Florida Water Management District is all about.
Views: 574 Hire Story
SWFWMD - FDACS IRRIGATION FOLLIES 2
 
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Spray Irrigation on Oct 18, 2013 at M.D. Council & Sons, 2910 Gulf City Rd, Ruskin FL.. Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems (FARMS) project H520 is located in the Most Impacted Area (MIA) of the Southern Water Use Caution Area (SWUCA). FARMS project H520 received a $96,445 government subsidy for an upgraded irrigation system due to the implemented water quantity Best Management Practices (BMPs) from the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) and the Florida Department of Agricultural and Consumer Services (FDACS). The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) approved Irrigation Water Management Plan states "The irrigation system shall be operated in a manner not to cause runoff or erosion" See video from Oct 10, 2012 at http://youtu.be/zLl2eCN0JeY
Clam Bayou, An Estuary in Peril
 
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Gulfport, Florida's Clam Bayou, used for decades as a de facto stormwater pond by neighbor St. Petersburg, remains full of toxic urban stormwater sediment despite a $17 million restoration project by SWFWMD (Southwest Florida Water Management District). Clam Bayou's once thriving commercial fishery, oyster harvest and namesake edible clams are gone. Dolphin and manatees can no longer negotiate the clogged, shallow and murky estuary. Unnatural numbers of mangroves perch on storm water deposits of mud and trash in formerly open water. Impeded water flow accelerates accretion of polluted sediments in a bayou that historically sustained significant bio-diversity. The natural sand bottom and grasses are buried beneath more than six feet of polluted sediments. SWFWMD's plan to remove a SWFWMD sediment "plug" created by their restriction of the natural channel will benefit navigation by a commercial kayak business financially linked to them but will not resolve toxic sediment accumulation in Gulfport. Would you wade or swim in Clam Bayou? Would you eat or serve a fish or bi-valve taken from it? Would you purchase a home adjacent to it? In 2009, the waters of Clam Bayou were scientifically confirmed as acutely toxic with toxins above threshold levels of between 65-85% mortality rates for the offspring of sensitive organisms. A combination of any two toxins in that range equates to 100% mortality. Clam Bayou contains twenty three such toxins. http://www.tbeptech.org/TBEP_TECH_PUBS/2009/TBEP_05_09_Clam_Bayou_Benthic_Report.pdf Local citizens use Clam Bayou as a supplemental food source with no warning of possible health risk. Florida's water management districts enjoy great authority with little accountability. Districts can define their own projects, modify projects as they see fit, purchase land at public expense, modify and improve land, declare land excess to public need and sell land at a profit. Districts have their own real estate acquisition branch and operate with minimal oversight by politically appointed boards upon which strip mining, commercial agriculture and developers are well represented. Imbedded water management bureaucrat scientists enjoy the equivalent of academic tenure and appear immune from responsibility for issues of delay, cost over-run and failure. SWFWMD created an artificial water feature on the St. Petersburg side instead of restoring the estuary in the Gulfport portion of the project. The water feature is adjacent to land recently rezoned for high density, high intensity development. Devon Adie, a graduate of the Academy at Charlemont in Massachusetts and visitor to Gulfport, took this video to document conditions he found on March 25, 2008. The estuary has significantly degraded since that time. Clam Bayou is the result of Florida's lack of compliance with both the letter and spirit of the 1972 federal Clean Water Act, the goal of which is "to restore and maintain the chemical and biological integrity of the Nation's waters" (33 U.S.C & 1251(a)). Clam Bayou is just one of three hundred and nine similarly degraded waters in Florida.
Views: 1450 TheWaterwatchers
Missing water from water system
 
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Citrus County water managers don't know what happened to millions of gallons of water in the Sugarmill Water System. And the county commission and Southwest Florida Water Management District want answers.
Views: 78 Robby Douglas
Water Levels
 
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The Southwest Florida Water Management District has been studying water flows and levels in Citrus County and other counties within SWFWMD's area. Doug Leeper, senior SWFWMD environmental scientist, updated Citrus County commissioners about what is being proposed for acceptable flows and levels in the county. For now, recommendations are only proposals, and more public meetings are scheduled before anything goes final. (April 26 2011)
Views: 109 Robby Douglas
Proper lawn maintenance
 
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Florida-Friendly Fertilizing -- Proper lawn maintenance.
Views: 1930 WaterMattersTV
Land Transformation: Improving Habitat and Water Quality
 
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The Fellsmere Water Management Area, part of the Upper St. Johns River Basin Project, in Florida is being converted from former farmland to a manmade wetland to improve water quality. A collaboration between the St. Johns River Water Management District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will also enhance wildlife habitat in the project area.
Views: 1119 SJRWMD
SFWMD Board Accepts Blake Guillory's Resignation, Appoints Pete Antonacci as Executive Director
 
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http://floridawaterdaily.com. On 9/10/2015, the SFWMD Governing Board accepted the resignation of Blake Guillory as Executive Director and appointed the governor's former General Counsel, Pete Antonacci to the position. No explanation for the resignation was given and no public comment was heard.
Overview of the Central Florida Water Initiative (CFWI) Solutions Planning Phase
 
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http://floridawaterdaily.com. Mark Hammond from the Southwest Florida Water Management District provides an overview of the CFWI Solutions Plan.
Introducing BoarBuster: A Better Hog Trapping System | Feral Hog Trap
 
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The BoarBuster™ is a revolutionary trap system that is fully suspended and can be observed and dropped remotely from anywhere with Internet service. This video explains the research that led to the development of the BoarBuster™ system. BoarBuster™ will be available commercially in summer 2015 from WW Livestock Systems. The BoarBuster system costs $5,995 for the trap and camera/motion sensor unit. A monthly fee for required cellular service is about $69/mo. Contact WW Livestock Systems by email at boarbuster@pldi.net or by phone at 1-800-999-1214. For more information on the trap, visit http://www.boarbuster.com. The automated trap sends text or email messages upon motion activation and streams live video through a designated Web server. This trap technology allows the user to observe and activate the traps via smartphone or computer. The suspended feature of the trap allows animals to enter or leave from all directions, eliminating trap-wary behavior associated with conventional trap gates. The user-activated trigger eliminates non-target animals from being captured. The corral design allows for captured hogs to be loaded out through an integrated door when convenient. Preliminary data suggests that the BoarBuster trap has the potential to capture 88 percent of the hogs from established populations while reducing the labor time per hog to one-third of that needed by drop-nets and corral traps. The BoarBuster™ trap technology was designed at the Noble Foundation to help mitigate the economic and ecologic damage caused by growing populations of feral hogs in the U.S. and other countries. The Noble Foundation worked with Tactical Electronics and WW Livestock Systems to bring this technology to the marketplace. http://www.boarbuster.com http://www.wwmanufacturing.com http://www.tacticalelectronics.com http://www.noble.org/feral-hogs/
Views: 1948288 Noble Research Institute
CHNEP Watershed Summit: Facilitating Ag Resource Management Systems (FARMS)
 
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The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP) is a partnership working to protect the natural environment in Florida from Venice to Bonita Springs to Winter Haven. The CHNEP hosts the Charlotte Harbor Watershed Summit every three years to learn about current research and restoration efforts, critical environmental issues affecting the Charlotte Harbor watershed and to review progress since the preceding summit. Summits are important in the CHNEP process of bringing public and private stakeholders together. This video is of one of the 43 presentations given during the March 25-27, 2014 summit. Visit www.CHNEP.org/Summit2014.html to learn more and see PDF files of posters. This summit was made possible by all the speakers who donated their time and to sponsors. • $2,000: Mote Marine Laboratory | CF Industries • More than $1,000: Charlotte County | Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center | Mosaic • $500: Atkins | EarthBalance | Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission | Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. | Peace River Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority | Stantec • $250: Science and Environmental Council of Southwest Florida • $100: Benchmark EA | Friends of the Charlotte Harbor Aquatic Preserves | Friends of Charlotte Harbor Estuary, Inc. (CHNEP Friends) | Jaime Boswell, Freelance Natural Resources Consultant | Captain Joe Kliment | Lemon Bay Conservancy | Sierra Club - Greater Charlotte Harbor Group | Sierra Club - Calusa Chapter | Southwest Florida Watershed Council | Corrine and Tom Winter | Sierra Club Calusa Chapter | "Ding" Darling Wildlife Society/John McCabe | Robert Hilgendorf | anonymous donors • less than $100: Estero Bay Buddies | anonymous donors Status of the Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems (FARMS) Program and Shell and Prairie Creek Reasonable Assurance Plan Jennifer L. Brunty, Ph.D.(1), jennifer.brunty@swfwmd.state.fl.us Edward Craig, edward.craig@swfwmd.state.fl.us (1)Southwest Florida Water Management District, 6750 Fruitville Rd. Sarasota, FL 34240-9711 To address the impairment in water quality related to elevated Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) concentrations in the City of Punta Gorda's in-stream potable water supply, a stakeholders group was formed in 2001 to develop a "Reasonable Assurance Plan" to document management actions that will restore/protect water quality within Shell, Prairie, and Joshua Creeks (SPJC). The goal of the Reasonable Assurance Plan is to implement agricultural best management practices (BMPs), primarily utilizing the District's Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems (FARMS) Program, that improve water quality within SPJC to Class I standards for TDS and Chlorides by 2014, with progress reports to be published every two years and a final report in 2015. Through January 2014, 158 FARMS BMP projects have been initiated with 49 of those in the SPJC. Typical FARMS BMP's implemented are tailwater recovery ponds, precision irrigation systems, and surface water control. While BMPs are targeted to improve mineralized water concerns within the SPJC watershed, the water quality improvements also benefit nutrients and yield downstream to the lower Peace River and Charlotte Harbor. The 2010-2012 progress report shows that gains have been made toward achieving Class I water quality standards since the 2004 implementation of the Reasonable Assurance Plan; however, additional time will likely be needed to fully meet standards.
Views: 18 CHNEP1995
CHNEP Watershed Summit: Habitat Restoration in Charlotte Harbor
 
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The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP) is a partnership working to protect the natural environment in Florida from Venice to Bonita Springs to Winter Haven. The CHNEP hosts the Charlotte Harbor Watershed Summit every three years to learn about current research and restoration efforts, critical environmental issues affecting the Charlotte Harbor watershed and to review progress since the preceding summit. Summits are important in the CHNEP process of bringing public and private stakeholders together. This video is of one of the 43 presentations given during the March 25-27, 2014 summit. Visit www.CHNEP.org/Summit2014.html to learn more and see PDF files of posters. This summit was made possible by all the speakers who donated their time and to sponsors. • $2,000: Mote Marine Laboratory | CF Industries • More than $1,000: Charlotte County | Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center | Mosaic • $500: Atkins | EarthBalance | Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission | Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. | Peace River Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority | Stantec • $250: Science and Environmental Council of Southwest Florida • $100: Benchmark EA | Friends of the Charlotte Harbor Aquatic Preserves | Friends of Charlotte Harbor Estuary, Inc. (CHNEP Friends) | Jaime Boswell, Freelance Natural Resources Consultant | Captain Joe Kliment | Lemon Bay Conservancy | Sierra Club - Greater Charlotte Harbor Group | Sierra Club - Calusa Chapter | Southwest Florida Watershed Council | Corrine and Tom Winter | Sierra Club Calusa Chapter | "Ding" Darling Wildlife Society/John McCabe | Robert Hilgendorf | anonymous donors • less than $100: Estero Bay Buddies | anonymous donors Habitat Restoration in Charlotte Harbor Stephanie T. Powers, stephanie.powers@swfwmd.state.fl.us SWFWMD, Surface Water Improvement and Management Program, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa, FL 33637, (813)985-7481, extension 2213 The Southwest Florida Water Management District (District) Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) Program has partnered with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Parks Service over the past decade to complete several habitat restoration projects on FDEP and District owned lands within the Charlotte Harbor watershed. Two large-scale projects, the Alligator Creek Habitat Restoration Project and the Coral Creek Ecosystem Restoration Project, are currently underway. These multi-year, phased projects encompass over 4,000 acres of land in Charlotte County, providing significant benefits to wildlife and fisheries. The Alligator Creek Habitat Restoration Project is located on a 1,600 acre site that is owned by FDEP and is located south of Punta Gorda abutting Charlotte Harbor. The project is now in Phase III of design. Previous phases included a total of seven projects, encompassing nearly 740 restored acres. Five additional projects are included in Phase III. Project goals for this phase consist of restoring the historic hydroperiod to approximately 90 acres of wetland and salttern area, which has been severely impacted by anthropogenic activities. Construction is expected to commence in the fall of 2013. Monitoring of Project 16, within Phase II, is expected to be completed in the fall of 2013. The Coral Creek Ecosystem Restoration Project is located on 2,600 acres of FDEP and District co-owned land. The land is managed by the FDEP. This multi-faceted project consists of hydrologic and habitat restoration of degraded and impacted wetlands on the Cape Haze peninsula. The project is also expected to provide water quality polishing for stormwater flows currently entering the project area from the Rotonda subdivision. A feasibility report for the entire site has been completed, which identifies seven phased project areas. Construction of this phase will be completed in the fall of 2013. Design of Phase II is expected to begin in September 2013. Future project phases for Alligator Creek are not planned at this time. However, six additional phases of the Coral Creek project are conceptually designed. Including the two above mentioned projects, the SWIM Program has partially or fully funded over 40 research and restoration projects in the Charlotte Harbor watershed, leading to nearly 1,100 restored acres.
Views: 161 CHNEP1995
105 Video of Mitsubishi 9700 Series UPS
 
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Mitsubishi Series 9700 UPS System
CHNEP Watershed Summit: An Alternative Approach to Water Management
 
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An Alternative Approach to Water Management An Alternative Approach to Water Management: An Example from the City of Winter Haven David Tomasko, Ph.D.(1), david.tomasko@atkinsglobal.com Mike Britt, P.E.(2), mbritt@mywinterhaven.com M.J. Carnevale(2), mcarnevale@mywinterhaven.com (1)Atkins North America, 5300 W. Cypress Street, Suite 300, Tampa, FL 33607 (2)City of Winter Haven, P.O. Box 2277, Winter Haven, FL 33883 The State of Florida has contributed more than 30 percent of all the water quality data in STORET, the nation's water quality data warehouse. Those 24 million data entries result in Florida having a greater density of water quality data than anywhere else in the US. Despite this data richness, numerous water management programs in Florida are quick to use complex water quality models that often incorporate rate coefficients that aren't locally derived, and are often based on a limited number of laboratory experiments. This has often resulted in water quality models being calibrated through the modification of rate coefficients that have never been locally measured, while empirically-derived water quality targets have been ignored. These complex mechanistic water quality models are often the basis for the development of TMDLs and the design of resource management plans. The reliance on overly complex water quality models and/or inappropriate water quality target setting techniques appears to have given rise to a number of problematic TMDLs for a variety of Florida lakes. This issue appears to be related to the tight timelines laid out in the TMDL program's authorization, which doesn't always allow for sufficient time to develop the body of knowledge necessary for more realistic and appropriate water quality targets in some locations. Within the Peace River watershed, lakes in Polk County in particular have been the focus of a number of TMDLs. In the City of Winter Haven, Lakes Shipp, May and Lulu have fully implemented their respective TMDLs, with no evidence yet of improved water quality. This project focuses on the potential reasons for this disappointing track record, and it highlights an alternative approach to lake management that focuses less on complex water quality models and more on empirically-derived water quality targets and alternative lake management strategies.
Views: 53 CHNEP1995
2012.05.23. Steve Riva comments at EPA's Public Meeting on PSD Air Permit for Arecibo's Incinerator
 
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These comments made by EPA officer Steve Riva were denounced in a formal complaint submitted on 6/14/2012 which reads as follows: June 14, 2012 Judith Enck Regional Administrator, Region 2 EPA 290 Broadway, New York, NY 10007-1866 RE: Arecibo Puerto Rico Renewable Energy Project Prevention of Significant Deterioration- Air Permit Application Complaint Dear Ms. Enck, This is a formal complaint regarding what we understand to be inappropriate statements and conclusions made by Steven C. Riva, Chief of the Permitting Section, Air Programs Branch of Region 2 of EPA, during the orientation meeting held on May 23, 2012 at the University of Puerto Rico, Arecibo campus. We respectfully request his removal from the process. The purpose of the meeting was to answer questions as to EPA's intent to grant Energy Answers a Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit for an incinerator it is planning to build in Arecibo. As an introduction to the meeting, Mr. Riva presented the proposed project and EPA's evaluation of the permit application. It was with great dismay and astonishment that the audience was submitted to unilateral defense of the incinerator, instead of an objective analysis of the same. We were expecting a summary of EPA's evaluation and objective criticism of the emission control technology to be employed. Instead, Mr. Riva actively promoted the incinerator for Arecibo and actually sounded like a spokesperson for Energy Answers. As proof of our allegations we are submitting a CD copy of the video clips of the meeting, and below we have enumerated and referenced (minutes of the video) some of the statements which illustrate our complaint: 1. "The bottom line in the review is that we have a resource recovery facility that has the state of the art controls, that will achieve limits lower than any other resource recovery facility probably in the United States." (minute 10:04) 2. Referring to a possible violation of the proposed incinerator he said: "I can assure you...We have a baseline concentration. We have standards that protect the air quality and then we settle a limit called an increment below that standard that could never be exceeded. So there can never be a situation that we have a violation in air quality standards..." (minute 12:00) 3. Answering a question of whether the Energy Answers project is one or two incinerators, he said: "If you were to recycle 50% of the waste in PR, there would still be a need for one or two incinerators to get rid of the waste." (minute 39:45) 4. When asked with respect to the mass balance of the process comparing what is collected as ash (bottom and fly ash) versus the other unaccounted for 1,700 tons/day he said: "that's combustion, other than the pollutants listed in Table 1... the rest is basically CO2 and water" (minute 2:18:09 ) 5. In what we consider an offensive, subjective and objectionable statement, Mr. Riva finished up his interventions that night blaming those present for not achieving the recycling levels that we should have accomplished, implying that there's no other choice than to accept the incinerator: "you really have to start doing it because recycling rates have not increased since I started the project." (minute 2:50:05 aprox.). It is clear that Mr. Riva cannot evaluate this project objectively. His expressions cast serious doubts on EPA's evaluation of the PSD permit for this incinerator. We request that you do a thorough investigation of how this evaluation has been conducted up to now. We feel that Mr. Steve Riva has demonstrated that he has lost all impartiality and should be removed from any further consideration of this proposal. We believe it would be reasonable to initiate a new PSD process. What is at stake here is EPA's image and credibility, and most importantly, the health of the people of Arecibo and of the surrounding municipalities and ultimately the whole island. Cordially, Teresa Sánchez Madres de Negro de Arecibo Aleida Centeno, Esq. Comité de Derecho Ambiental y Recursos Naturales Colegio de Abogados de Puerto Rico Martha Quiñones Domínguez Ciudadanos en Defensa del Ambiente (CEDDA) Orlando Negrón, CPA Presidente de Sierra Club de Puerto Rico Angel A. González, MD Comité de Salud Pública y Ambiental Colegio de Médicos-Cirujanos de Puerto Rico Cc: José Font Director Interino Caribbean Office, EPA City View Plaza II, Suite 7000 Guaynabo, PR 00968-8069
Views: 527 elizallenza
Center cuts the subsidy for Micro Irrigation - జైకిసాన్ - on 16th June 2014
 
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Jaikisan is a powerful platform and voice of Farmer.The programme is outside the domain of technology.It is a prime driving force of issues,problems,concerns related to farmer's support systems,pricing,marketing of farm produce & live stock.commodity futures,govt schemes,input subsidies,policies,regulatory issues and day to day farm events,happenings of specific regional importance as well as innovations and achievements of wider impact in the farm sector.Not only this,one more key area is off- farm success stories of farmer groups/associations/cooperatives/companies in the farm sector.
Views: 88 ETV Jaikisan
OEPA's public hearing on the Husky Lima Refinery air permit
 
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Held on Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at the Lima Municipal Building, this public hearing was convened by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency concerning the draft permit which the agency had prepared for intended upgrades at Husky Energy's Lima Refinery.
Views: 211 City of Lima, Ohio