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Ucsf Prostate Cancer - What's New In Prostate Cancer Treatment? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
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Ucsf Prostate Cancer - What's New In Prostate Cancer Treatment? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. For alternative option go to https://wp.me/p9xQ8n-55 ucsf prostate cancer - prostate cancer overview. ucsf prostate cancer radiation Or poster at the annual UCSF Prostate Cancer research retreat 2013 UCSF Prostate Cancer Retreat ucsf prostate cancer nomogram The authors thank Jeanette Broering, Hazel Dias, Alex Ignatov, Sarah Joost and Frank Stauf for operating and managing the UCSF Urologic Oncology Outcomes Database and Nannette Perez for supporting the UCSF prostate cancer active surveillance cohort The hallmark of research in the UCSF Prostate Cancer Program is innovative scientific approaches to important problems in prostate cancer. Prostate cancer decisions: mayo clinic radio. Esmo 2017: prostate cancer highlights. Lifestyle and Diet May Stop or SuMMarY heaLthY proState CaNCer diet 23 frequently asked Questions University of California, San Francisco Patient Advocates Stan Rosenfeld, ucsf prostate cancer diet. He is the leader of the Genitourinary Medical Oncology Program and an investigator with the UCSF Prostate Cancer Program. The hallmark of research in the UCSF Prostate Cancer Program is innovative scientific approaches to important problems in prostate cancer. 2015 UCSF Prostate Cancer Program Retreat. The authors thank Jeanette Broering, Hazel Dias, Alex Ignatov, Sarah Joost and Frank Stauf for operating and managing the UCSF Urologic Oncology Outcomes Database and Nannette Perez for supporting the UCSF prostate cancer active surveillance cohort. Search Results For: ucsf prostate cancer active surveillance. Poster presentation, UCSF Prostate Cancer Retreat, San Francisco, CA, on May 23, 2011 PROCEEDINGS: 1993 Wyeth Pediatrics: Pediatric and adolescent gynecology: a challenge for the '90s. 3/01: UCSF Prostate Cancer Retreat, “Interrupting assembly of nuclear hormone receptor transcriptional activation complexes: Implications for drug development”. Place Clinical Science Poster, UCSF Prostate Cancer Retreat. June 16, 2010, Josh Stuart, UCSF Prostate Cancer Retreat. 6/01-5/02: Co-PI (with Robert Fletterick), UCSF Prostate Cancer Research Program, “Novel. Best Poster presentation award at the Annual UCSF prostate Cancer Research Retreat-2016. Or poster at the annual UCSF Prostate Cancer research retreat. 2011 UCSF Prostate Cancer Research Retreat. 5 Million for UCSF Prostate Cancer Research. Search Results For: ucsf prostate cancer radiation. Expert opinions in prostate cancer brazil 2017. What's new in prostate cancer treatment? Patients with advanced prostate cancer are currently treated with combinations and sequences of immunotherapies hormonal approaches and chemotherapy. Freedland presented "nutrition and prostate cancer: what we think we know and what we actually know" at the 22nd annual scottsdale prostate cancer symposium on thursday march 16 2017. Nutrition and prostate cancer what we think we know and what we actually know. Body rig research highlights - treatment of prostate cancer at ucsf using different tools and techniques such as hifu prostate hyperthermia micropet / ct images of psma and hyperpolarized c-13 mr. Localized prostate cancer: progress toward personalized care. Rethinking prostate cancer at ucsf with matthew cooperberg, md. In the era of prostate cancer screening mortality rates have fallen 40 percent. In the era of prostate cancer screening mortality rates have fallen 40 percent. In the era of prostate cancer screening mortality rates have fallen 40 percent. Viewing prostate cancer aggressiveness in a unique way. #UcsfProstateCancer ucsf prostate cancer treatment, ucsf prostate cancer diet, ucsf prostate cancer clinical trials, stanford prostate cancer, ucsf prostate cancer program, ucsf lung cancer doctors, ucsf prostatectomy Reference: https://youtu.be/dU-E-_axrZc https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLmSMVj8_5y8Mt-0eXZtUt67k3ad2OGOW https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostate_cancer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_California,_San_Francisco https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oU-BAjUppfU
Views: 2605 Best Tongkat Ali
UCSF - Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
 
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Learn more about how UCSF's expert team is advancing cancer care and research worldwide.
Targeted Therapy in Melanoma
 
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Sunil Reddy, MD, Medical Oncologist, Cutaneous Oncology Specialist at Stanford Health Care and Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine. The presentation is part of AIM at Melanoma’s Living with Melanoma Symposium co-hosted with UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center on September 29, 2018 in San Francisco, CA.
Views: 49 AIMatMelanoma
Patient Specific Stem Cells for Precision Medicine
 
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Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, discusses the use of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells in cardiovascular research. *Note: the first minute or two of the lecture was not recorded due to technical issues.
Views: 149 UCSF-Stanford CERSI
Renal Cell Carcinoma
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) In the United States, there are over 60,000 new diagnoses and nearly 14,000 deaths from kidney cancer each year. Dr. Won Kim reviews the epidemiology of kidney cancer (including established risk factors), the biology and pathophysiology of kidney cancer, treatment options for localized disease, and the role of systemic therapy in the treatment of advanced, metastatic disease. He also discusses the current and future role of immunotherapy in kidney cancer. Recorded on 07/15/2014. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [9/2014] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 28502]
The inauguration of Marc Tessier-Lavigne as Stanford's 11th president
 
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Marc Tessier-Lavigne was inaugurated as Stanford University's 11th president on October 21, 2016. The ceremony, conducted in Frost Amphitheater, featured musical performances by student groups Talisman and Stanford Taiko, as well as the St. Lawrence String Quartet and Kyle Tessier-Lavigne. More information: http://president.stanford.edu/inauguration
Views: 8183 Stanford
Accelerate Research for a Cancer-Free World!
 
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Researchers at UC San Francisco are leading the way in identifying new pathways to treating many types of cancer. You can be a part of this movement by contributing directly to the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Give today at http://proj.at/1anxbig
UCSF Researchers Control Embryonic Stem Cells With Light
 
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UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. Read more: http://tiny.ucsf.edu/7eHzI7 Director: Arezu Sarvestani Producer: Sara Shaffer PIO: Nicholas Weiler
‘Butt Cancer’ Talk Wins 2018 Postdoc Slam Competition
 
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Sona Chowdhury, PhD, a UCSF postdoc, explains how her research into a specific microRNA may help to prevent or impede anal cancer progression when the cell mutation was initially caused by HPV infection. Video by UCSF Educational Technology Services (ETS). Read more about Chowdhury's research and the Postdoc Slam competition: https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2018/10/411931/raising-awareness-humor-talk-butt-cancer-wins-2018-postdoc-slam
UCSF Radiology Thomas Link - Preventing Fractures and Degenerative Joint Disease Through Research
 
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For the last 25 years, Thomas Link, MD, PhD has focused his research on degenerative diseases of the musculoskeletal system, in particular on osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. His goal is to develop imaging tools which allow radiologists to better assess the risk to an individual patient of suffering from a severe degenerative joint disease. This risk assessment can then identify a window of time during which therapy and lifestyle modifications can prevent the disease from either occurring or progressing. For Dr. Link, this research has a personal feel. Three generations of women in his family have suffered severe limitations in their quality of life due to severe degenerative changes of the knees, bilateral hip osteoarthritis and bilateral knee osteoarthritis.
Views: 119 UCSF Imaging
Early Diagnosis of Cancer: Imaging at the Molecular Level
 
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(May 25, 2010) Dr. Sam Gambhir M.D., PhD., Professor of Nuclear Medicine at the Stanford University Medical School, discusses how nuclear medicine and different imaging techniques can be used to diagnose cancer and other diseases at early stages at the molecular level. During the final quarter of the Stanford Mini Med School, some of the most timely and important topics in contemporary medicine and the biosciences are addressed. Stanford Mini Med School is a series arranged and directed by Stanford's School of Medicine and presented by the Stanford Continuing Studies program. Stanford University: http://www.stanford.edu Stanford Medical School: http://med.stanford.edu/ Stanford Continuing Studies: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/stanford
Views: 10583 Stanford
Advances in Melanoma Detection, Screening, and Prevention
 
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Susan Swetter, MD, Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program and the Cutaneous Oncology Program at Stanford University Medical Center and Caner Institute. The presentation is part of AIM at Melanoma’s Living with Melanoma Symposium co-hosted with UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center on September 29, 2018 in San Francisco, CA.
Views: 55 AIMatMelanoma
Prof. Donald I. Abrams MD - Cannabis and Cancer Care
 
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Donald I. Abrams, MD. is chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at San Francisco General Hospital and a Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. He has an Integrative Oncology consultation practice at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine. He received an A.B. in Molecular Biology from Brown University in 1972 and graduated from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1977. After completing an Internal Medicine residency at the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco, he became a fellow in Hematology/Oncology at the Cancer Research Institute of the University of California, San Francisco in 1980. He was one the original clinician/investigators to recognize and define many early AIDS-related conditions. He has long been interested in clinical trials of complementary and alternative medicine interventions for HIV/AIDS and cancer, including evaluations of medicinal Cannabis. In 1997 he received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to conduct clinical trials of the short-term safety of cannabinoids in HIV infection. Subsequently he was granted funds by the University of California Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research to continue studies of the effectiveness of cannabis in a number of clinical conditions. He completed a placebo-controlled study of smoked cannabis in patients with painful HIV-related peripheral neuropathy as well as a study evaluating vaporization as a smokeless delivery system for medicinal. He conducted an NIDA-funded trial investigating the possible pharmacokinetic interaction between vaporized cannabis and opioid analgesics in patients with chronic pain. He is now conducting an NIH-funded trial investigating vaporized cannabis in patients with Sickle Cell disease. He co-authored the chapter on “Cannabinoids and Cancer” in the Oxford University Press Integrative Oncology text that he co-edited with Andrew Weil. He co-edits the NCI PDQ CAM Cannabinoids and Cancer website. For further credentials and a summary of the scientific evidence to be presented to the court, please see Fields of Green for ALL’s Expert Witness page.
Views: 2752 Dagga Couple
Top 10 Best Cancer
Treatment Hospitals in The World
 
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Here are the top 10 Best Cancer Treatment Hospitals in The World 👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇 10. Stanford Health Stanford Hospital, Stanford, California: This hospital was founded in 1968 and it is located in the California. It is a well known hospital for treatment of cancer diseases. This hospital has well experienced doctors, nurses, staff that also provides many other diseases treatment. It provides treatment of heart diseases, organ transplantation, brain diseases, cancer and various other surgeries and therapies. This hospital has yearly 40 thousand room visits. This hospital can treat 20 thousand patients yearly. This hospital also provides helicopter facility to take the patient to the hospital with only one call. 9. UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco: It is one of the leading hospital and institute in research in San Francisco, California. This hospital provides treatment for all the complex diseases. The medical institute id affiliated with the university of California and it is located in the Parnassus Heights, Mission Bay. This hospital has been ranked in the top 10 in various disease treatments including diabetes, neurology, gynecology, cancer and many more. From the Chuck Feeney, this hospital has been gifted with a donation of $100 million. This hospital is very famous for its advanced treatment of cancer. The doctors also provide awareness of cancer by providing the right information to the patients. This hospital can treat 500 patients at one time. This hospital can treat 14 different types of cancers and other major diseases. 8. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston: It is 2nd biggest hospitals in the England and it is very famous hospital to treat cancer diseases. The research center of this hospital is located in the West End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. This hospital can treat thousand patients at one time. It offers cancer treatment nationally and internationally. This hospital provides high quality and best services to cancer patient and also provides medicines to the patient. This hospital also uses chemotherapies and radio therapies to remove cancer from every body part of the patient. This hospital can treat various cancers, including bone, breast, blood, bladder and many more. 7. UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles: This hospital was founded in 1955 and it is located in the Los Angeles, CA. This hospital had already 23 thousand entries in surgical treatment. This hospital treat 10 thousand patients annually and 15 thousand surgeries. It is also a teaching institute. This hospital is also ranked in adult and children special treatment. This hospital also known as the Ronald Reagan Medical Center. The department of this hospital works 24 hours to treat various diseases. This hospital also uses latest and new technology to treat various types of cancer diseases. This hospital also has very experienced doctors, that prevent the further possibility of cancer and control it at the first stage. This hospital provides various treatments at a reasonable rate. 6. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore: It is one of the most famous hospitals in the world. It is one of the best institute and hospital for treatment of cancer. This hospital is located in the Baltimore, USA. It has also well experienced and qualified doctors and trainers. The hospital also provides huge types of treatment plans for the patients. The doctors and research team are given different tasks to diagnose and treat cancer from anyone’s life. With the new and advanced technique, the doctors can make it possible to cure the Genetic abnormalities and also the cancer diseases. It helps to treat various types of cancer including, colon, gyne, breast, head cancer and much more. It also provides various programs to treat various diseases and cancer. This hospital also provides another treatment, including stem cell transplantation, DNA repair, regulating cell cycle and much more. 5. Seattle Cancer Care Alliance or the University of Washington Medical Center: SCCA is located in the Seattle, Washington. This hospital was started in 1998 by the Fred Hutchinson. This hospital has well experienced surgeons, doctors, oncologists and other faculty. In 2014, this hospital treat 7 thousand patients. The doctors help to treat many cancers, including breast cancer, lung, colon and many other cancers successfully. In 2015, this hospital has been named in the list of 5 best cancer treatment hospitals. This hospital also performed the transplant program of the Fred Hutch Bone Marrow. The vice president of the hospital is Norm Hubbard. This hospital uses 20 different methods to treat cancer and it also provides transplantation and bone marrow operation facility. This hospital also has its branches in various places of the Washington state. 4. Dana Farber and Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Boston: This hospital is located in the Boston, Massachusetts and it is founded in 1997. It helps to treat a wide variety of cancer diseases.
Views: 1339 WORLD WiNNER360
Stanley Falkow (Stanford University) Part 2: Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Cancer
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/host-pathogen-interactions-human-disease/#part-2 Lecture Overview Ninety percent of the cells humans carry are microbes. Only a few of the bacteria we encounter are pathogenic and can cause disease. Pathogens possess the inherent ability to cross anatomic barriers or breach other host defenses that limit the microbes that make up our normal flora. A significant part of human evolution has gone into developing ways to thwart microbial intrusion. In turn, microbes have come up with clever ways to avoid and circumvent host defenses but human — microbe interactions is still a "Work in Progress." When we study pathogens we learn as much about ourselves as we do about them. Helicobacter pylori lives in the human stomach. It causes gastritis, ulcer disease and even gastric cancer. Some H. pylori can inject a protein, CagA, into gastric epithelial cells. CagA interacts with the tight junctions that bind cells together and with signaling molecules affecting motility and proliferation. CagA is associated with ulcer disease and cancer but we don't understand how it works to favor malignancy. Not long ago in history most humans carried H. pylori ; the incidence of carriage and gastric cancer is dropping but there is evidence that this microbe also had a protective effect on human health.
Views: 15693 iBiology
The sugar coating on your cells is trying to tell you something | Carolyn Bertozzi | TEDxStanford
 
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In her talk about sugar and cancer, Stanford Chemistry Professor Carolyn Bertozzi tells us why the sugar coating on our cells is crucial to our health and well-being. Unlike the sugar coating on a peanut M&M, she explains, human cells are covered with complex sugars Bertozzi shows us are, “like foliage swaying in the breeze.” The language these sugars are speaking can tell us everything from what blood type we are to whether we have cancer. Carolyn Bertozzi is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Chemical & Systems Biology and Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford, and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She completed her undergraduate degree at Harvard and her doctorate at UC Berkeley. After postdoctoral work at UCSF and a professorship at UC Berkeley, she joined the faculty at Stanford coincident with the launch of Stanford ChEM-H. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 60820 TEDx Talks
Hepatitis B: Current and Future Therapies
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Marion Peters, MD, Professor of Medicine Chief of Hepatology Research, UCSF Recorded on 11/06/2015. Series: "UCSF Transplant Update" [Health and Medicine] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 30513]
Breast Cancer Genetics, Risk, and Screening
 
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Breast Cancer Genetics, Risk, and Screening Stanford's breast cancer experts share the latest information about: -Breast density and breast cancer risk -Screening recommendations -New breast imaging technologies including tomosynthesis and contract enhanced mammography -Breast cancer genetics Speakers: Sunita Pal, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine; Allison W. Kurian, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Research & Policy, Associate Director, Program in Clinical Cancer Genetics Learn more: http://stanfordhealthcare.org/stanford-health-now/health-library-videos/breast-cancer-genetics.html http://stanfordhealthcare.org/medical-conditions/cancer/breast-cancer.html http://stanfordhealthcare.org/medical-clinics/breast-cancer-program.html Visit: http://stanfordhealthcare.org/
Views: 1769 Stanford Health Care
NETRF Bay Area NET Patient Education Conference - 15 Tumor Board Cases : Afternoon Session Q and A
 
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NETRF Bay Area NET Patient Education Conference Stanford Cancer Center & NET Research Foundation 2.4.2017 www.netrf.org George Fisher, MD, PhD Colleen G. Haas Professor of Medicine, Co-Leader of GI Oncology Group Stanford University School of Medicine Pamela Kunz, MD Assistant Professor, Medical Oncology, Stanford University Thomas Hope, MD Assistant Professor in Residence in the Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine sections at UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans A airs Medical Center Andre Iagaru, MD Associate Professor, Radiology (Nuclear Medicine), Stanford University Justin Annes, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Endocrinology, Stanford University Emily Bergsland, MD Professor of Clinical Medicine, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCSF Yan Li, MD, PhD Oncologist, Kaiser Oakland Jeffrey Norton, MD Professor, Surgical Oncology, Stanford University Mark Welton, MD Professor, Surgery, Stanford University
Views: 103 NETRF
The Role of Technology, Data and Innovation in Improving Global Cancer
 
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Panel: “The Role of Technology, Data and Innovation in Improving Global Cancer” Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, Stanford University (Moderator) Megan Huchko, MD, MPH, UCSF Eduardo Zambrano, MD, MSC, Stanford University Sherry Wren, MD, Stanford University Tracy Sherertz, MD, UCSF Kris Sankaran, Stanford University 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research Hilton San Francisco Union Square April 8, 2016
Views: 32 GlobalOnc
Dealing with the Emotional Aspects of Cancer - Dr. Manuela Kogon
 
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On September 25, 2010 the Caring for Carcinoid Foundation held its first Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Education Conference at Stanford University's Alumni Center in Palo Alto California, USA. This day-long event was attended by over 100 patients and caregivers and featured neuroendocrine tumor experts from Stanford University and UCSF Medical Center.
Views: 1576 Caring4Carcinoid
Gynecologic Cancer Treatment
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Explore treatments, other than surgery, to treat gynecologic cancer: radiation, cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted treatments, and immunotherapy. Recorded on 03/21/2017. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [6/2017] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 32079]
Bench to Bedside: Autism Spectrum Disorder, part 2 - From Genes to Pathology - Matthew State (UCSF)
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/autism-spectrum-disorder/#part-2 Dr. Bryan King introduces the autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and Dr. Matthew State overviews the hunt for genes associated with autism. Talk Overview: In the first lecture, Dr. Bryan King introduces the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and defines the clinical criteria that characterizes ASD. Although there is no universal drug that is used to treat ASD, there are multiple medications used in the setting of autism. King outlines the different drugs used to treat the core behavioral features of autism as well as psychiatric disorders associated with autism (e.g. ADHD and anxiety), and discusses the challenges and problems with designing clinical trials to study drugs to treat ASD, specifically with the heterogeneity of the ASD population. In the second lecture, Dr. Matthew State overviews the hunt for genes associated with autism and explains how studying de-novo rare mutations in the germline has advanced the understanding of the genetics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studying a cohort of families with one affected individual and one unaffected sibling, they were able to map multiple genes involved in ASD. Because of the complexity of the developing brain, the same gene could act upon different regions of the brain at different times during development. Therefore, after identifying genes associated with ASD, they characterized the region and time during development where these genes are expressed and more likely to have an effect that is associated with ASD. Speaker Biography: Dr. Matthew State is the Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco and President of the Langley Porter Psychiatric Hospital and Clinics. He obtained his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University (1984) and received his medical degree from Stanford Medical School (1991). He continued his medical training at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute specializing in Child Psychiatry, and completed a doctorate degree in genetics at Yale University (2001). State was a faculty member at Yale University from 2001 to 2013. In 2014, he joined the faculty at UCSF where his laboratory studies the genetics and genomics of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, with a particular interest in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Tourette Disorder. For his scientific contributions, State received the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health from the National Academy of Medicine (2017), and was elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (2014). Learn more about State’s research at his lab website: http://www.mstatelab.com/
Views: 800 iBiology
UCSF Zika Symposium Part 1 of 2
 
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Preparedness for the Zika Virus: A Public Health Emergency This event brought together researchers from UCSF, UC Berkeley, UC Davis and Stanford University as well as public health officials. Topics for the Zika symposium include epidemiology and prevention, basic science of the Zika virus, vector biology and control, clinical management, and policy. Live streamed March 7, 2016 From the UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, CA Sponsored by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and convened by UCSF Global Health Sciences
CLOSING REMARKS - 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research
 
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Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, Stanford University Katherine Van Loon, MD, MPH, UCSF 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research Hilton San Francisco Union Square April 8, 2016
Views: 80 GlobalOnc
Cancer Genetics and Precision Cancer Therapy - Life Sciences Forum
 
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Please join us as MITCNC hosts the second Bay Area with/in/sight lecture series from the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. We invite you to enjoy the networking reception, mingle with fellow guests and scientists, and join us for a series of informative talks about recent exciting progress in the areas of cancer genetics and new treatments based on our understanding of cancer genes. The event will showcase research from MIT's Dr. Tyler Jacks, PhD, David H. Koch Professor of Biology, Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. Professor Jacks will discuss work from his laboratory on the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target common genetic alterations in many human cancers. Dr. Jacks will be joined by Dr. Kevin Shannon, MD, who is the Roma and Marvin Auerback Distinguished Professor in Pediatric Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Shannon, a physician-scientist, will discuss the challenges and opportunities of new cancer medicines from a clinical perspective. Rounding out the program will be Dr. Jeffrey Settleman, PhD. Dr. Settleman is Senior Director of Discovery Oncology at Genentech. He will present research from his own laboratory at Genentech as well as review new cancer therapeutic programs at the company. The panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Laura D. Attardi, PhD, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Radiation Oncology & Genetics, at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Jim Wells and Michelle Arkin(UCSF) Part 1: Introduction to Drug Discovery
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/archive/introduction-drug-discovery-process/ The modern drug discovery process integrates our deepest understanding of the molecular basis for disease with fundamental understanding of how potential drug molecules interact with specific disease targets and the whole organism. These two lectures are intended to give a broad and general introduction to the drug discovery process. Part I focuses on the early stages of drug discovery. We describe the basic stages of the drug discovery process, beginning with how disease targets are identified. We then take you into the laboratory to show you how a popular approach, high throughput screening, is used to identify! compounds that can engage the molecular target or pathway of interest. See more at http://www.ibioseminars.org
Views: 36851 iBiology
Welcome and Opening Remarks - 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research
 
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Welcome and Opening Remarks Lisa Stevens, PhD, Deputy Director, Center for Global Health, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Bev Mitchell, MD, Director, Stanford Cancer Institute Alan Ashworth, PhD, FRS, President, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center 4th Annual Symposium on Global Cancer Research Hilton San Francisco Union Square April 8, 2016
Views: 37 GlobalOnc
UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences Overview
 
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Learn more at https://weill.ucsf.edu
Atrial Fibrillation for the Interested Layperson
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) UCSF cardiologist Dr. Gregory Marcus covers the basic mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation - an irregular, often rapid heart rate. He discusses the consequences of the disease, and the various therapies available for treatment. Gregory is the Director of Clinical Research in the Division of Cardiology at UCSF. Recorded on 06/03/2015. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [9/2015] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 29727]
Aging Gracefully, Donald I. Abrams, MD
 
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Donald I. Abrams, MD Chief, Hematology-Oncology, San Francisco General Hospital Integrative Oncology, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of California San Francisco Donald I. Abrams, MD is chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at San Francisco General Hospital, an integrative oncologist at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. He graduated from Brown University in 1972 and from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1977. After completing an Internal Medicine residency at the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco, he became a fellow in Hematology-Oncology at the UCSF Cancer Research Institute in 1980. He was one of the original clinician/investigators to recognize many of the early AIDS-related conditions. He conducted numerous clinical trials investigating conventional as well as complementary therapies in patients with HIV including therapeutic touch, Traditional Chinese Medicine interventions, medicinal mushrooms, medical marijuana and distant healing. His interest in botanical therapies led him to pursue a two-year Fellowship in the Program in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona which he completed in December 2004. His particular passion in the field involves nutrition and cancer. Since completing his Fellowship, Dr. Abrams has been providing Integrative Medicine consultation to people living with and beyond cancer at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine. He co-edited an Oxford University Press textbook in Integrative Oncology with Andrew Weil, MD. He is a member of the NCI PDQ CAM Editorial Board. Dr. Abrams was President of the Society of Integrative Oncology in 2010.
Zika Symposium Part 2 of 2
 
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Preparedness for the Zika Virus: A Public Health Emergency This event brought together researchers from UCSF, UC Berkeley, UC Davis and Stanford University as well as public health officials. Topics for the Zika symposium include epidemiology and prevention, basic science of the Zika virus, vector biology and control, clinical management, and policy. Live streamed March 7, 2016 From the UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, CA Sponsored by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and convened by UCSF Global Health Sciences
Precision Medicine For Belatacept
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Minnie Sarwal, MD, FCRP, DCH, PhD. Professor, Department of Surgery, UCSF. Jun Shoji, MD. Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, UCSF. Recorded on 05/18/2018. Series: "UCSF Transplant Update" [9/2018] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 33827]
The Science and Art of Integrative Medicine
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Explore the research behind the science of integrative medicine with Dr. Kevin Barrows, UCSF Department of Family and Community Medicine and Medical Director, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [11/2013] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 25721]
Joseph DeRisi (UCSF) Part 2: Malaria: Research
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/plasmodium-falciparum/#part-2 This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series.
Views: 5157 iBiology
UCSF Medical Center: Transforming Health Care
 
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UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay project receives $125 million matching gift from Chuck Feeney and Atlantic Philanthropies. CEO Mark Laret explains importance of gift to the new children's, women's specialty and cancer hospitals due to open in 2014, and the hospitals' impact on the Bay Area, California and the nation. Visit http://missionbayhospitals.ucsf.edu for more information.
Views: 1008 UCSFMBtube
UCSF Mission in a Minute: Michael Steinman, MD
 
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Dr. Michael Steinman received his medical school training at Harvard Medical School and completed a residency in primary care internal medicine at UCSF. He then joined the UCSF Division of Geriatrics for fellowships in the VA National Quality Scholars Program and the UCSF Clinical Geriatrics Fellowship. Dr. Steinman has been a member of the faculty at UCSF since 2004. Dr. Steinman is a national leader in identifying and improving the quality of medication prescribing in clinically complex older adults. He devotes most of his time to research, while also maintaining an active clinical practice in the geriatrics clinic and inpatient general medicine service at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. Dr. Steinman's research program focuses on improving how doctors prescribe medications for older adults, and is supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging, and the American Federation for Aging Research. His research interests also include pharmaceutical industry marketing and the impacts of marketing on physicians and trainees. Dr. Steinman is Co-Director for Research and Director of Research Training for the UCFS Division of Geriatrics, and is leader of the Data Management and Accrual Core for the UCSF Pepper Center for Aging Research. He also serves as Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research at UCSF's Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). He is Immediate Past-President of the California Region for the Society of General Internal Medicine.
How To Catch Breast Cancer Early: Stanford Doctors Explain Mammography Options
 
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There are several breast cancer detection options, and it is recommended that all women over age 40 get their mammograms. It has been shown that regular screening can catch breast cancer early and save lives. Stanford radiologists Drs. Debra Ikeda and Jafi Lipson explain the different types of imaging available and also explain the newest technology, tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography. Visit: http://stanfordhealthcare.org/bcaware
Views: 46895 Stanford Health Care
Living with NETS
 
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With Dr. George Fisher, Stanford, Kari Brendtro, NANETS, Dr. Manuela Kogon, Stanford, Nicole Barr, Stanford, Dr. Misha Cohen, UCSF, and Angela Laffan, Stanford
Views: 769 Caring4Carcinoid
Mom from san francisco @ UCSF medical center
 
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Hemant had a great idea to send a video update to our loved ones.
Views: 153 vishalm
Liver Resections and Liver Transplants for Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients - Dr. Brendan Visser
 
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On September 25, 2010 the Caring for Carcinoid Foundation held its first Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Education Conference at Stanford University's Alumni Center in Palo Alto California, USA. This day-long event was attended by over 100 patients and caregivers and featured neuroendocrine tumor experts from Stanford University and UCSF Medical Center.
Views: 1873 Caring4Carcinoid
Virtual Reality (VR) Pain Relief UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital Oakland
 
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Study at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland testing the use of virtual reality technology to help manage pain. The Virtutal Reality Goggles distracts patients from their pain. The mind can only focus on so much stimulation at once and given something else to focus on, the pain a person experiences will diminish. Patient, Briana, exhausted from days of nearly unbearable pain is transformed just a half an hour later, while interacting with a virtual reality game. VR pain management research to study how immersive virtual reality therapy can be used to reduce pain is ongoing at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland.
Graphene: The future of cancer therapy
 
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http://www.cealtech.com/2017/11/29/graphene-future-cancer-therapy/ 29th November 2017/ Cytotoxic agents are currently the main course of treatment for metastatic cancers. Unfortunately, these treatments often result in the destruction of healthy cells, are highly toxic and can lead to chemo-resistance. This support the need to find new effective targeted treatments and seek delivery methods which overcome drug resistance. The exploration of graphene in drug delivery for cancer treatment was first initiated in 2008 by Stanford University and has been since the topic of intensive research. Due to the 2D structure and high specific surface area, graphene is able to adsorb a variety of therapeutic molecules with high capacity and even facilitate their entry into the cell. Moreover, by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect of tumors, the use of Graphene as a drug nanocarrier for cancer treatment has the potential to passively deliver chemotherapeutic and metabolism altering agents to cancer populations with increased specificity, whilst minimizing dosage and side effects of the drugs. Manipulating the hydrophilic–lipophilic properties of graphene (blue hexagonal planes) through chemical modification would allow interactions with biological membranes (purple-white double layer), such as drug delivery into the interior of a cell (blue region) (Ref. doi:10.1038/nature11458 – A roadmap for graphene) However, as most publications conclude, more pre-clinical studies and extensive clinical trials will be necessary to move this forward into the clinic to ensure patient benefit. Towards this end, a research project led by Associate Professor Hanne Røland Hagland, is investigating the use of CealTech’s graphene as drug carrier for treatment of cancer, using cell models from leukaemia and colorectal cancer. The project is carried out at the Centre for Organelle Research (CORE), and is in collaboration with Prof. Lars Herfindal from the University of Bergen. Ph.D. candidate Abdelnour Alhourani and MSc candidate Jan Lukas Førde are working on developing a graphene-based drug nanocarrier for dual chemotherapeutic and adjuvant metabolic drug delivery. Their work will focus on testing the cellular localization of fluorophore-conjugated graphene sheets of controlled sizes, and adapting appropriate biocompatible polymer functionalization to better understand the intracellular effects of graphene. The aim is to determine the capacity of CealTech’s graphene to enhance chemotherapy by shuttling adjuvant metabolism altering agents that are able to reverse chemo resistance. The viability of this approach is to be tested through multiples cell-based assays to monitor the cytotoxicity and metabolic shifts of cancer cells before additional testing in more advanced model systems.
Views: 572 gary larrabee
Immunotherapy, a new weapon against cancer
 
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Dr. Jon LaPook introduces us to the next frontier of cancer treatment: immunotherapy, in which the body's own immune system is genetically modified to detect and destroy cancer cells. Subscribe to the "CBS Sunday Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20gXwJT Get more of "CBS Sunday Morning" HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlMmAz Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/23XunIh Like "CBS Sunday Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1UUe0pY Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1RquoQb Follow "CBS Sunday Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1O3jk4x Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- "CBS Sunday Morning" features stories on the arts, music, nature, entertainment, sports, history, science, Americana and highlights unique human accomplishments and achievements. Check local listings for CBS Sunday Morning broadcast times.
Views: 3161 CBS Sunday Morning
UCSF Radiology Richard Souza - Combining Imaging Techiques and Biomechanics to Treat Osteoarthritis
 
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Osteoarthritis is a common disease with limited treatment options at this time. In his lab, Richard Souza, PhD, PT, and his team are working on lower extremities biomechanics research, looking at people with diseases of the lower extremity, such as hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), and how they move. The researchers use 3D motion analysis to carefully quantify the movement patterns of patients when they are walking or climbing stairs or rising from a chair. The researchers also look carefully at patients’ joints using quantitative MRI techniques that have been developed by UCSF radiologists. By following these people over time, Dr. Souza’s team can determine which patients are getting worse in their disease and which movement patterns are predictive of disease progression.
Views: 98 UCSF Imaging
NETRF Bay Area NET Patient Education Conference - 10 Nuclear Medicine Imaging: Treatment for NETs Pe
 
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NETRF Bay Area NET Patient Education Conference Stanford Cancer Center & NET Research Foundation 2.4.2017 www.netrf.org Thomas Hope, MD Assistant Professor in Residence in the Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine sections at UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans A airs Medical Center Dr. Thomas Hope is an assistant professor in residence in the Abdominal Imaging and Nuclear Medicine sections at UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In 2007, he received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine and he completed a one-year internship at Kaiser Permanente, San Francisco. From 2008-2012, Dr. Hope completed a residency in Diagnostic Radiology at UCSF, followed by a clinical fellowship in Body MRI and Nuclear Medicine from Stanford Medical Center in 2013. Dr. Hope’s main research focus is on novel imaging agents. He is the principle investigator on the Ga-68 DOTA-TOC IND at UCSF and the Ga-68 HBED-CC PSMA IND at UCSF. He plans to combine his interests in MR imaging and nuclear medicine to help further the combined modality, PET/MR.
Views: 1296 NETRF
Leslie Zimmerman, MD, Lung Cancer Part 2: Clinical Presentation and Management
 
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How does lung cancer present clinically? Dr. Zimmerman covers these, with a focus on the conditions that manifest advanced stages of the disease. Workups of patients suspected to have lung cancers are discussed. More on Dr. Zimmerman: http://profiles.ucsf.edu/leslie.zimmerman UC San Francisco advances health through education, research, patient care and public service. With seven major sites in the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, the UCSF School of Medicine is dedicated to improving human health by accelerating scientific discovery and transforming medical education. The school’s new Bridges curriculum is pioneering a new approach to medical education to prepare physicians for practice in the 21st century. Through mentorship and collaborative learning, students are trained to care for patients, conduct research and contribute vital knowledge to improve our health system. Visit our channel home page: https://www.youtube.com/c/UCSFSchoolofMedicine Subscribe to this channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprcipiXNXTzJYJfN02rHsA?sub_confirmation=1
UCSF Chancellor in Conversation with UCSF's Elizabeth Blackburn
 
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UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann, MD, MPH, sat down for a conversation with molecular biologist Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD, who was named to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The conversation was simulcast to the UCSF Mission Bay campus, Rock Hall Auditorium. Blackburn and her colleagues are recognized for discovering an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most cancers. The scientists research sparked a whole field of inquiry into the possibility that this enzyme, called telomerase, could be reactivated to treat such age-related diseases as blindness, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases, and deactivated to treat cancer, in which it generally is overactive. Desmond-Hellmann, a board-certified physician in internal medicine and medical oncology, became UCSFs first woman chancellor in August. She previously served as president of product development at Genentech, during which time many of the companys patient therapeutics were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, making Genentech the nations No. 1 producer of anti-cancer drug treatments.