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10 Years After Katrina, Has New Orleans Been Rebuilt, Or Just Gentrified?
 
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10 years after hurricane katrina, New Orleans is booming. Tourism and development are on the rise. New residents are moving in and opening up businesses. The city looks like a success story, but it’s not all good. Before Katrina, it was possible to find affordable rent. Afterward, New Orleans lost 140,000 black residents and thousands of rental units. Income levels are falling while housing prices are skyrocketing. It’s now among the worst U.S. cities for renters. We went there to ask: Is it being rebuilt, or just gentrified? Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 30441 AJ+
New Orleans: Recovery or Removal?
 
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Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, a new documentary from The Laura Flanders Show and teleSUR English explores the race, class and gender outlines of the reconstruction of New Orleans. At least seventy-one billion dollars in federal money has been spent. But has every opportunity been seized to bring back not just the place, but its people, so they’re stronger and healthier than before? We explore, from the grassroots, systemic changes in housing, economic development, and policing. How have federal, state and city policies affected the people of New Orleans? Lieutenant General Russell Honoré was put in charge of military rescue efforts after Hurricane Katrina. What he saw was a man-made disaster, caused by politicians under control of the oil and gas industry. “Our problem is, because of the damage that has been left by the oil and gas industry, we have less wetlands today than we had 20 years ago,” he says. “It's been supported by Congress, multiple presidents in the White House, and all our governors. We are the second largest energy producer in America and we're the second poorest state. The state has been looted.” “We've got 52% unemployment as it relates to African-American males, but we're experiencing an economic boom,” explains New Orleans city council president Jason Williams. “Our major industry is tourism; hospitality, restaurants, hotels, motels. The folks who are working those jobs in the kitchen, making up the beds, cooking the food, those folks are the working poor in this town. It's just for generations they have not shared in the revenue in those industries.” Oliver Thomas was city council president at the time of Katrina, and was on track to be the city’s next mayor, until he went to federal prison for accepting bribes. He says that the recovery took the wrong direction from the beginning. “Our mayor and too many of our business people wanted a market based recovery, and that's what we got. We should have fought for a community-based recovery. We should have brought our working class people back, set up temporary housing, schools, and medical for them, then build from there. Since we didn't do that, that's why we're struggling, that's why a ten year recovery will probably end up being a twenty, for some, if it every happens.” Sean Cummings, a developer that has helped reshape New Orleans’ downtown, takes a different perspective. He says that the city is improving, and federal dollars were well spent. “I think the city's brand has been extended worldwide, even more deeply into the consciousness of people than it had been before,” he says. “All sorts of young people coming here, filmmakers, furniture makers, glass casters, folks in the film industry, entrepreneur startup companies, they want to live in these historic neighborhoods.” He says rising rents are a sign of an improving economy. “I think you just have to look at it a little bit perhaps broader geographic perspective where folks are displaced. Where actually are they displaced? Does it not make it a more robust community?” Toya Lewis is part of an organization called Stand With Dignity that has been fighting for jobs and opportunities for New Orleans poorest residents. As a former public housing resident, Toya says that her former community was torn down in the name of profit. “The developers wanted to tear down public housing for money. It's money, it's greed. It has nothing to do with humanity or beautifying anything, because if that was the case, they could have replaced what existed,” she says. “One of the biggest things that's necessary in decriminalizing blackness is creating a equitable economy,” she adds. The film is produced and directed by Jordan Flaherty and executive produced by Laura Flanders and teleSUR English. Story producer is Marin Sander Holzman; camera by Joshua J. Bagnall, Melisa Cardona, Jonathan Klett, Abdul Aziz, and CrossPond Productions. Edited by Anna Barsan, Rebecca Scheckman and Jonathan Klett. Score by Drop Electric, with additional music by TBC Brass Band. Translation by Cynthia Garza. Featuring interviews with Lieutenant General Russel Honoré, the commander of military relief operations during Katrina; former New Orleans city council president Oliver Thomas; current city council president Jason Williams; developer Sean Cummings; activists and former public housing residents Alfred Marshall and Toya Lewis; Brice White of the Jane Place Neighborhood Sustainability Initiative; spoken word artist Asia Rainey; youth activist Milan Nicole Sherry; and Rosana Cruz of Race Forward. Also featuring Roy Brumfield, Leticia Casildo, Jolene Elberth, Fernando Lopez, Darnell Parker, Glenn Ross, Randy Silliman, BreakOUT!, Congreso de Jornaleros, Jane Place Neighborhood Sustainability Initiative, Oya Market, Ping Chong + Company, and STAND With Dignity.
Katrina Farmer
 
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Katrina is committed to bringing home buyers and sellers together. She will use an extensive marketing plan; as well as the most current technology to accomplish this. Call or text anytime at 631-295-6606
Views: 11 Company Contact
Louisiana's $50 Billion Plan to Rebuild the Coast
 
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Aug. 28 -- Huge swaths of the Louisiana coast were lost during Hurricane Katrina 10 years ago. Now the state is focused on rebuidling parts of it. Louisiana is spending billions on the project, but not everyone is happy about it. Bloomberg's David Gura reports. -- Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 1443 Bloomberg
Hurricane Katrina 10 Years Later: New Orleans’ Turnaround
 
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July 23 -- Ten years after Katrina, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu talks with Mark Halperin about the changes he’s seen in the Crescent City since he took office in 2010. He speaks on “With All Due Respect." --Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 11390 Bloomberg
What Do Prices "Know" That You Don't?
 
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Find LearnLiberty on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/VLLCWp If you want to do good for the world, Prof. Michael Munger has a piece of advice: Listen to the price system. He compares prices to a genie that knows everything in the world and tell you exactly what goods and services humanity needs most. He tells a story of two hypothetical farmers. One ignores the price system and tries to plant what the world needs most. Overwhelmed by the quantity and complexity of the data needed to figure out what crop is most needed, he eventually fails. The other farmer is selfish and profit-driven. He doesn't understand that the high soybean price reflects increased demand for a new soy-based product in Asia -- he just wants to make money. But by listening to the price system, he produces exactly what the world needs most. Learn More! In a podcast, Prof. Munger discusses how the market responded to shortages induced by Hurricane Sandy: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2012/11/munger_on_john.html A 1989 chart from the CIA shows that how the Soviet Union failed to feed its citizens in the absence of a price system: http://chnm.gmu.edu/1989/items/show/182 Learn Liberty video explains the importance of the price system to a well-functioning economy: http://www.learnliberty.org/content/price-system-part-i-information Academic article examines whether scarce resources are best allocated by the price system or central rationing: http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/3003300?uid=3739936&uid=2&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21101489024873 An economist explains how the price system led Wal*Mart to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TJ7Mkw3rME
Views: 83155 Learn Liberty
George W. Bush Back In New Orleans 10 Years After Hurricane Katrina
 
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George W. Bush has returned to New Orleans to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina – a natural disaster that killed almost 2,000 people. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 7038 AJ+
Thriving in a Challenging Environment
 
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One of the few healthcare organizations in the area to make it through Hurricane Katrina, Ochsner today is a thriving operation with dominant market share. Warner Thomas explains how Ochsner overcame key operational challenges--including a series of hospital acquisitions and the cultural integration of new employees--with leadership and management systems that enabled them to plan strategically and execute to their objectives.
Views: 69 GE Healthcare
Anderson Cooper returns to the Gulf 10 years after Katrina
 
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Sneak peek at Katrina: The Storm That Never Stopped, a CNN Special Report tonight at 9p ET on CNN.
Views: 7487 CNN
The challenges of rebuilding after Harvey, Irma, Maria
 
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Taylor Morrison CEO Sheryl Palmer on efforts to rebuild after the recent hurricanes and the state of the housing market.
Views: 300 Fox Business
What a Hurricane Taught Me About Building My Business Online
 
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If you think building a business online will ensure you never have to speak to people again, you're sorely mistaken. In this episode of the Daily Dose of Awesome, Chef Katrina shares her insights on what Hurricane Irma taught her about building a business online. Understanding that everything happens for a reason, planning for the worse or the best and knowing that everything we do is ultimately going to lead us to connect with people. To start connecting with people online visit: http://elitemarketingpro.com/go/amf-bootcamp-ddoa
Views: 172 Elite Marketing Pro
Four Years after Katrina, New Orleans Making Progress Towards Recovery
 
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More than four years after Hurricane Katrina struck and flood waters washed over New Orleans, the city is showing signs of significant recovery. The population is still not back to pre-Katrina levels, but rebuilding efforts and tourism are thriving. VOA's Greg Flakus has more.
Views: 1185 VOA News
S1 E1: Sea Level Rising - Living with Water
 
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Louisiana still is learning from Hurricane Katrina. Forecasts are dire for Louisiana to experience the second-highest sea level rise in the world. There is a big movement brewing in New Orleans to build adaptive "resilience zones." In Southeast Louisiana, the native peoples of the Isle de Jean Charles have become the first U.S citizens moving within their homeland displaced by climate change. Learn more at linktv.org/earthfocus
Views: 1479 Link TV
New Orleans: Aerial view of Katrina recovery
 
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Kim Brunhuber takes us on a float plane over New Orleans to see what's been done since 2005 to prevent catastrophic loss of life and property from another '100-year storm' like Katrina. »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/cbcnews?sub_confirmation=1 Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://www.cbcnews.ca Find CBC News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cbcnews Follow CBC News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cbcnews For breaking news on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCAlerts Follow CBC News on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CBCNews/posts Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://instagram.com/cbcnews Follow CBC News on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/cbcnews// Follow CBC News on Tumblr: http://cbcnews.tumblr.com »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.
Views: 1460 CBC News
Hurricane Katrina: 10 Years Later
 
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The National Insurance Crime Bureau released segments of a five-part documentary video that provides first-hand recollections of NICB employees and law enforcement personnel as they reflect on their roles in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Widespread destruction, NICB responds While Katrina impacted parts of Alabama, Florida and Mississippi, its most widespread destruction occurred in Louisiana in and around New Orleans. After making landfall on August 29, 2005, Katrina’s heavy rainfall and significant storm surge caused breaches in a number of the levees protecting New Orleans from Lake Pontchartrain. As a result of those levee failures, roughly 80 percent of New Orleans was underwater by August 31. In terms of property damage, Hurricane Katrina was the most costly on record with insured losses estimated at over $41 billion*. Part of that figure came from insurance claims on more than 300,000 vehicles damaged or destroyed by Katrina—vehicles that presented an attractive opportunity for fraud. Recognizing the unprecedented number of vehicles that were flooded or otherwise damaged from Katrina, NICB dispatched teams to the region and established the Gulf Coast Task Force (GCTF) which operated from two locations: Baton Rouge, La. and Mobile, Ala. Over the next several months, NICB personnel from all over the United States were rotated through the GCTF where they worked side-by-side with state and local law enforcement officers in identifying and cataloging the thousands of damaged vehicles that littered every part of New Orleans and Mobile—and most points in between—in Nature’s random display of destruction. As the vehicle inventory process took shape, GCTF personnel had some time to pursue allegations of insurance fraud, which NICB was receiving on its hotline almost from the moment Katrina made landfall. Even as search and recovery efforts were underway, some saw opportunity to exploit tragedy for personal and illicit gain. NICB investigated everything from bogus claims for flooded vehicles that were nowhere near the storm area to yachts being scuttled by their owners, but blamed on Katrina so they could collect an insurance payoff. The birth of VINCheck To prevent unsafe flood vehicles from entering the commerce stream disguised as legitimate used vehicles, NICB created the “Katrina Flood Vehicle Database.” This database was populated with the vehicle identification numbers (VINs) of every Katrina-damaged vehicle that was insured by one of NICB’s 1,100 member insurance companies. Although initially developed to more efficiently share data with law enforcement, state fraud bureaus, motor vehicle departments and insurance companies, NICB realized that allowing consumers to have free access to this data was the best way to help them protect themselves from making an expensive—and potentially life-threatening—flood vehicle purchase. Within two months of Katrina’s landfall, the Katrina Flood Vehicle Database was opened to the public. As this free consumer protection grew in popularity and usage, its name evolved into VINCheck. With the new name and with the cooperation of participating insurance companies, VINCheck not only identified flood vehicles, but any vehicle that had been declared a total loss, salvage, or was an unrecovered stolen vehicle. Since its creation, VINCheck has been the most visited page on the NICB.org website. From January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2014, more than 5 million VINs have been searched through VINCheck. The hurricanes of 2005, of which Katrina was the Queen of Destruction, challenged all levels of government, as well as state and local law enforcement, the insurance industry and disaster relief agencies. The lessons learned from Katrina helped government and non-government officials deal with another mega storm when 2012’s Sandy devastated the Eastern Seaboard and other inland areas. While natural disasters are an unfortunate reality of life, we can understand them. To some extent, we can prepare for them and mitigate their damage. But when ill-intentioned people use these events to commit fraud against a population already reeling from a disaster, they will eventually attract law enforcement’s attention with NICB agents at their side. As we did after Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Wilma, Ike, and Sandy, NICB’s nationwide distribution of investigative and analytical resources are poised to deter, detect and defeat acts of insurance fraud that would cause further harm to the legitimate victims of catastrophes.
Views: 3424 InsuranceCrime
If we don’t laugh, we cry | Virginia Saussy | TEDxNewOrleans
 
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The events following Hurricane Katrina inspired action and determination - as well as the need for traditional New Orleans-style fun. The continuation of Mardi Gras, a true New Orleans tradition, was necessary and an important custom that stimulated laughter and joy through satire and parody. Virginia Saussy joined Sucre, a New Orleans based Sweet Boutique and confection studio, to strengthen the administrative management, organize fulfillment and fine-tune sales and marketing efforts. Within 18 months her work led to a 300% increase in expansion of distribution. In her tenure at Mignon Faget, Ltd., she enabled company growth through strong branding and relationship marketing, taking sales from $1.3 million to over $13 million and saving the company from tragedy after Hurricane Katrina. After the storm, Virginia used her skills to rebrand a devastated New Orleans neighborhood, establishing the Broadmoor area as the come-back story of the city. She is a founding member, officer, and the creative force behind The Krewe of Muses. Virginia Saussy has been honored with awards including Gambit Magazine’s 40 Under 40 (2002), Newcomb College Outstanding Alumnae (2006), and Top Female Achiever by New Orleans Magazine (2012) and is a frequent speaker at area universities. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 554 TEDx Talks
If You are Poor, It’s Like the Hurricane Just Happened: Malik Rahim on Katrina 10 Years After
 
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Democracynow.org - We continue our coverage of the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina by speaking to Malik Rahim, co-founder of the Common Ground Collective and one of the founders of the Louisiana chapter of the Black Panther Party. In 2005, he and the Common Ground Collective helped bring thousands of people from all over the world to assist in the rebuilding of New Orleans. Just weeks after Hurricane Katrina hit the city, Malik took us around the neighborhood of Algiers, where he showed us how a corpse still remained in the street unattended, lying right around the corner from a community health center. Malik returns to Democracy Now! to talk about the storm a decade later. Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,300+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8­9am ET: ​http://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: http://democracynow.org/donate  FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow YouTube: http://youtube.com/user/democracynow SoundCloud: ​http://soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email: ​http://democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: ​https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: ​http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: ​http://democracynow.tumblr TuneIn: ​http://tunein.com/radio/Democracy­Now­p90/ Stitcher Radio: ​http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/democracy­now
Views: 4513 Democracy Now!
CSP Retreat 2009:  Slideshow
 
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Sales Representatives for Cutco Cutlery and Vector Marketing head to New Orleans to help Habitat for Humanity build homes for those still in need after Hurricane Katrina. During their time, they were able to strengthen relationships and plan for future giving events.
Views: 144 Carl Drew
New Orleans - French Quarter, Bourbon Street, Hurricane Katrina flooded areas - USA VLOG 05
 
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Zobacz moje Playlisty: http://www.youtube.com/user/MocnyVlog/videos?flow=list&live_view=500&sort=dd&view=1 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/VlogMocny Twitter: https://twitter.com/MocnyVlog Instagram: http://instagram.com/mocnyvlog G+ https://plus.google.com/b/100527924422655708354 Strona: http://www.MocnyVlog.pl
Views: 60097 MocnyVlog
Charter Schools, Race, & Urban Space: Where Market Meets Grassroots Resistance (w/ Kristen L Buras)
 
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Professor Kristen Buras the author of Charter Schools, Race, and Urban Space: Where the Market Meets Grassroots Resistance explains how charter schools took over New Orleans post Hurricane Katrina. Her case study of New Orleans—where veteran teachers were fired en masse and the nation’s first all-charter school district was developed—shows that such reform is less about the needs of racially oppressed communities and more about the production of an urban space economy in which white entrepreneurs capitalize on black children and neighborhoods... This clip from the Majority Report, live M-F at 12 noon EST and via daily podcast at http://Majority.FM Download our FREE app: http://majorityapp.com SUPPORT the show by becoming a member: http://jointhemajorityreport.com and BUY all of your Amazon purchase thru our Amazon affiliate link: http://majorityreportkickback.com LIKE us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/MajorityReport FOLLOW us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MajorityFM SUBSCRIBE to us on YouTube: http://youtube.com/user/SamSeder WATCH our LIVE show video stream: http://youtube.com/user/MajorityReportLIVE
Be a Better Human_ Podcast - Episode 1 - "Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life"
 
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Join Shanna Forrestall of http://www.forrestallconsulting.com as she chats with thought leaders to discuss ideas for small steps we can all take to create major change. Episode 1 - "Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life" - features Dr. Joanne Royer of Change Agents & Associates. https://joanneroyerphd.com/ About "Shanna from Louisiana" Shanna Forrestall, known as “Shanna from Louisiana”, has over twenty years of experience in advertising, marketing and public relations in the US and Canada, and as the industry evolved she has come to focus on the power of social media. Shanna is now based in Pasadena, CA where she provides social media and marketing consulting, along with a range of services including social media setup, cleanup, content creation & strategy, development of custom marketing and digital assets for a variety of corporate and nonprofit clients. Shanna was a professional actress for over 12 years and has been featured in more than 100 film and television projects. She is also an experienced producer with years of experience as an Associate Producer for a variety of television projects for networks like The History Channel and TruTV. She has also produced six short films in the US that tackle social issues, and several video projects in India to support a school for disabled children and to raise awareness on the plight of eunuchs in Indian society. Shanna is now also a Consulting Producer on Restoring Balance: Autism Recovery, a groundbreaking documentary by brain trauma specialist Ryan Hetrick. Shanna is a lifelong humanitarian and is most proud of her non-profit work around the world. Since Hurricane Katrina she has been involved in several large recovery efforts in the south, including the Great Flood of 2016 in Louisiana that affected her hometown of Gonzales and surrounding areas. In the disaster over 450k people lost their homes in a 1000 Year Flood. In August of 2017, she also returned from her honeymoon to help survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, TX. Shanna has partnered with major corporations and local humanitarians to generate hundreds of thousands of dollars in practical resources and cash donations to support families in recovery. She is also very active with a variety of charitable organizations in the Los Angeles area, and is compelled to support programs that assist the homeless and advocate for women and children in crisis (Friends in Deed), empower mentally and physically challenged adults (AMVA, Actors for Autism, FVO), and animal rescue programs (like Kitty Bungalow: Charm School for Wayward Cats where she adopted her own little spoiled fella named ‘Beau Nola’ in honor of New Orleans). Shanna is currently a member of the Women’s City Club of Pasadena, the City Club LA and a member of the Pasadena Business Networking Association. Shanna’s range of experience & references may be best viewed on LinkedIn. Interested in having Shanna speak or teach on social media, emcee an event, be the face of your next commercial campaign, or produce a special project for your team? Contact her today. http://www.forrestallconsulting.com/contact
Video Ezine: Getting More Time Back to Market Your Biz with Katrina Sawa
 
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This week's video tip is all about getting more time in your busy entrepreneur day. One of the main things I work with my coaching clients on is their time management, what to focus on, how to manage their time, etc. BECAUSE....if you don't create more space or time for yourself you won't have the time to do the additional marketing strategies that you desperately need to do to grow your business! I know you're already wayyyyy tooooooo busy right? Of course you are, there isn't any entrepreneur that isn't too busy already. BUT....ARE YOU BUSY WITH THE RIGHT ACTIVITIES AND TASKS? Probably not always. Watch today's video then please comment on my blog while you're there and tell me what YOUR thoughts are about what you can do to clear or create more space/time for yourself ok? For more free info on business and marketing go to http://www.JumpstartYourMarketing.com/freegifts. Talk to you soon! ~ Katrina
Views: 52 Katrina Sawa
Post Hurricane Katrina Interview
 
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Interview with Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City crew after returning from Hurricane Katrina rescue mission. Aired 19 Sep 2005.
Views: 325 Dan Taylor
The President on the 10-year Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina
 
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President Obama delivers remarks in New Orleans on the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. August 27, 2015.
Views: 20311 The Obama White House
Managing Network Traffic During Hurricane Katrina
 
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See how AT&T's Global Network Operations Center kept voice and data traffic flowing during the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2005. Government Technology is the award-winning national magazine covering information technology's role in state and local governments. Keep up on government tech trends by viewing more videos at http://govtech.com/videos.
#Katrina10: The storm changed evacuation rules
 
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People on the Gulf Coast knew they had to evacuate before Hurricane Katrina, but some chose not to go because they didn't want to leave their pets behind. In 2005, many shelters still wouldn't allow animals. Hurricane Katrina helped change some rules that could ease pet owners minds' in future disasters. For more information please visit http://www.hlntv.com/video/2015/08/29/hurricane-katrina-pet-evacuations-disasters
Views: 1231 HLN
Obama speaks on Katrina anniversary in New Orleans
 
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President Obama visits New Orleans to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.
Views: 4682 Washington Post
They blew the levee to flood the lower 9th ward
 
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Witnesses heard bombs going off to flood the lower 9th ward to get ride of the blacks in this area at 4am. There was no way the storm could have flooded the lower 9th by its self or broke the levee. This was all well planned out and plotted. This is a crude sketch and explanation of what really happened the night of Katrina in New Orleans when they blew the levee. The evil plot to was planed in advance to flood and destroy the 9th ward or the city! The way I see it they did not need the Hurricane to destroy the 9th ward the city the hurricane was just a false flag! NO ONE will ever convince me it was not a planned event! What do they have--about two week lead time that a hurricane will likely end up in the gulf? I know as sure as I can be, that they knew the plan to empty the Lake into the 9th would work. There is strong consensus among scientists that man can affect direction and speed to some unknown extent, and Katrina, followed by (can't remember the 2n'd one's name) could cloud the truth and the media could spin anything it was told. They deliberately tested martial law there, and the effect of breaking up and scattering a close-knit people all over several states, further weakening their will to resist such treatment. I was sickened as their plans unfolded, and I couldn't do a thing. I'll never forgive that government for that, and I'll never get over it, either. It broke my heart to see what evil men can do. Please tell me you get it!!!! Mirrored from albatross234 (The TRUTH about the attack in New Orleans AFTER KATRINA PASSED) § 107.Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include — (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
Views: 18701 RubysTableTalk
Curiosity -- the key to leading a rich life | Kevin Oldham | TEDxYouth@GVHS
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. After a casual afternoon run, curiosity drove 30-something Kevin Oldham to wonder what it might be like to run a triathalon. He decided then and there that he wanted to find out. The only problem? He didn't know how to swim. A Marketing and Strategy Leader, Kevin Oldham thrives at the intersection of marketing and technology where his insatiable curiosity has led to a variety of entrepreneurial ventures and life experiences. From his first business at five years old through his current venture as co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer of a global real estate marketing company (Enhanced Marketing Solutions) and the most disruptive national real estate brokerage in the U.S. (United Real Estate), Kevin loves to collaborate and build important companies. Kevin's career highlights include launching Virgin Mobile in the U.S. with Best Buy Adverting and AMC Entertainment, securing large bridge reconstruction projects following Hurricane Katrina for HNTB, and he was the 2012 recipient of a Rising Star Award from Kansas City Business Magazine celebrating business leaders under the age of 40. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1586 TEDx Talks
Katrina anniversary: President Obama visits New Orleans
 
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President Obama visited New Orleans Thursday to mark the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The president said the city is moving in the right direction. CBS News' Omar Villafranca reports.
Views: 4993 CBS Evening News
Senior Corps: After the Storm
 
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This seven-minute, documentary-style video highlights the contributions of Senior Corps volunteers in Hurricane Katrina relief efforts in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.. The video shows how these "everyday heroes," many of whom were facing their own losses, sprang to action through the Foster Grandparent, RSVP, and Senior Companion programs to help those in great need. For more information, visit www.getinvolved.gov.
Hurricane Katrina Documentary(1) OFFICIAL
 
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Directed by Spike Lee Theme music composer Terence Blanchard Country of origin United States Original language(s) English Production Producer(s) Spike Lee Samuel D. Pollard Editor(s) Geeta Gandbhir Cinematography Cliff Charles Running time 240 minutes total, for part 1 & 2. Production company(s) 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks Release Original channel HBO Original release August 23, 2010 If God Is Willing and da Creek Don't Rise is a 2010 documentary film directed by Spike Lee, as a follow-up to his 2006 HBO documentary film, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. The film looks into the proceeding years since Hurricane Katrina struck the New Orleans and Gulf Coast region, and also focuses on the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and its effect on the men and women who work along the shores of the gulf. Many of the participants in Levees were also featured in this documentary. It won a Peabody Award in 2010 "for ambitiously chronicling one of the hugest disasters in American history, interrogating the well-known narratives and investigating other stories that could have easily fallen through the cracks."[1]
Hollygrove, New Orleans Farm and Market: Mike Beauchamp & JB | AARP
 
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On his way to the Essence Music Festival, James Brown, AARP Community Ambassador visits with Mike Beauchamp and other neighborhood gardeners at the Hollygrove Farm and Market in New Orleans. This neighborhood has made tremendous strides since Hurricane Katrina, with special attention to the needs of the local seniors in areas like nutrition, transportation, caregiving, and homegrown community leadership. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/KFywMu About AARP: AARP is leading a revolution in the way people view and live life after 50. AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of more than 37 million, that helps people turn their goals and dreams into real possibilities, strengthens communities and fights for the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare, employment security and retirement planning. Connect with AARP Online: Visit the AARP WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/1dAgW3N Like AARP on FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1akoB9b Follow AARP on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1a4qR40 Follow AARP on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/1aLhZx6 Hollygrove, New Orleans Farm and Market: Mike Beauchamp & JB | AARP http://www.youtube.com/user/aarp
Views: 1406 AARP
How to Purify Water Part 2 | IODINE - CHLORINE - CHLORFLOC | Survival Training | Tactical Rifleman
 
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In our first water purification video, I tried to cover all the different techniques for purifying water. We covered everything from Boiling to UV Light. However, when I got to chemical treatment, there were just so many different types on the market that I couldn’t hit them all in that one video. So, for this video, we are focusing just on chemical treatment. There are actually lots of options out there. The old Iodine tablets have been improved. There’s the Chor-Flox that the military is now issuing. Then, there are the multiple different ways to employ Chlorine. I cover the pros and cons of each. Which way is best? Nope, don’t go there. Ask “Which way is best for me?” I say that, because everyone has different situations and preferences. Taste alone, may steer certain people in certain directions. I talked fast in the video, and didn’t cover it very well. So, I wanted to talk a little more about the proper use of Calcium Hypochlorite or “Pool Shock”, as it is a great way to treat large amounts of water for your home (think Hurricane Katrina). While I don’t think it is great for backpacking; it is the best method I have found for long-term treatment and a large scale. A lot of people plan on using household bleach, if they are ever faced with a long-term situation (again, think Katrina). The problem with bleach, is it only has a 6 month shelf life, and is just nasty to work with. You can store Pool Shock damn near indefinitely, and it takes much less space. That said, you still need to store it away from your food or other gear (it gives off a slight gas), and it takes a bit of mixing to get the proper concentration for treatment. However, if you are willing to do it properly, you’ll see this is a great technique to keep in your mental toolbox. Here are some notes: Using granular Calcium Hypochlorite to disinfect water is a two-step process Note: Mix only in a Plastic or Glass container, NOT METAL!! Step-1: Make a stock of liquid chlorine solution · dissolve 1 heaping teaspoon of Calcium hypochlorite in two(2) gallons of water Step-2: Disinfect Water · Add one part of the liquid chlorine solution to 100 parts water to be treated; · Let sit for 30 minutes before use Example: Add 6oz of liquid solution to treat 4.75 gallons of Water in a five gallon bucket. (4.75 gallons = 608 oz of water) A 1-pound bag of 70% calcium hypochlorite in granular form (pool shock) will treat up to 10,000 gallons of drinking water. That’s a lot of water for your family to live off of. Again, this is a great technique to keep in your mental toolbox. Knowledge is power. Knowledge can be your best tool. So, enjoy the video and let me know which water treatment techniques you prefer or if you have anything that you think I have left out. I’m always looking for new techniques. What’s in your Bag? What’s in your Plan? Share your ideas and opinions. Don’t have an opinion? Maybe you need to get outside and get one. Don’t rely on the internet. You need to get out there. You need to get some real training. Don’t know where? Let me know, and I’ll point you in the right direction. Strength and Honor. Help support Tactical Rifleman by purchasing one of our T-shirts, check them out at: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/Tacticalrifleman/ Folding Bucket http://amzn.to/2t3RpDk Nalgene Water Bottle http://amzn.to/2rKMBi9 Potable Aqua Water Treatment Tablets http://amzn.to/2tXrp95 POTABLE AQUA PA+Plus Water Purification http://amzn.to/2s4mIt1 Aquamira Water Purifier Tablets http://amzn.to/2t3y4lF Aquamira - Water Treatment Drops http://amzn.to/2tXrFoz Chlor-Floc US Military Water Purification Powder Packets http://amzn.to/2tXuqGC Pool Shock http://amzn.to/2s0moQH For more go to http://www.tacticalrifleman.com/ and Follow me on Twitter-http://bit.ly/TACrman
Views: 11836 Tactical Rifleman
Interview with a Lower Ninth Ward home owner 4 years after Katrina
 
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Interview with a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans.
Views: 215 ontracklt
Hurricane Katrina: New Orleans Lower 9th Ward Tour w/ Vera McFadden & Monica Peters
 
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Vera McFadden, President of the Lower 9th Ward Neighborhood Council takes Monica Peters on a tour of the Lower 9. More footage coming.
Views: 393 TheGritsnCheeseDish
Part 1 of 2: The Lower Ninth: Ground Zero for Reparations and Education
 
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After the catastrophic damage Hurricane Katrina caused to the people and the property in the communities along the Gulf States in September 2005, one especially hard hit neighborhood in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans heard the announcement of the closure of all of its public schools until 2008. Instead of accepting the closing of one of their key institutions parents, community leaders, teachers, and administrators began to organize for King School's immediate reopening. Their organizing efforts take place within the context of a wider movement toward self-determination and the reclaiming of key community institutions termed reparations. This film reports on interviews, fieldnotes, discussions, findings, and actions taken during April 2006 immediately following Hurricane Katrina in the Lower Ninth Ward. Following recent work in cultural geography, critical race theory, and cultural studies, the film explores how one community, is rejecting systematic 'neoliberal' injustice, market imperatives, expansion of white capital and the violent dispossession of their property by claiming the right to self-determination. Through an analysis of the historical context which the Lower Ninth is situated, documents and speeches given by state officials, interviews of community members, the film illustrates several economic and educational themes that are represented in their struggle: racial geography, local fiscal control, the role of capital in ethnic cleansing, and a pedagogy of racial justice. Finally, the film offers a New Orleans framework for understanding how communities are forging a new narrative of liberation by claiming and taking reparations.
Views: 4688 Nat Turner
Naomi Klein: How to Resist Trump's Shock Doctrine
 
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Shock. It’s a word that has come up a lot since November— for obvious reasons. I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about shock. Ten years ago, I published “The Shock Doctrine,” an investigation that spanned four decades from Pinochet’s U.S.-backed coup in 1970s Chile to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. I noticed a brutal and recurring tactic by right wing governments. After a shocking event – a war, coup, terrorist attack, market crash or natural disaster – exploit the public’s disorientation. Suspend democracy. Push through radical “free market” policies that enrich the 1 percent at the expense of the poor and middle class. The Trump administration is creating chaos. Daily. Of course many of the scandals are the result of the president’s ignorance and blunders – not some nefarious strategy. But there is also no doubt that some savvy people around Trump are using the daily shocks as cover to advance wildly pro-corporate policies that bear little resemblance to what Trump pledged on the campaign trail. And the worst part? This is likely just the warm up. We need to focus on what this Administration will do when it has a major external shock to exploit. Here's a 5-step plan. . Subscribe to our channel: https://interc.pt/subscribe Website: https://theintercept.com/ Facebook: https://interc.pt/facebook Twitter: https://interc.pt/twitter
Views: 63421 The Intercept
Katrina Remembered: The Torch, The Face, The Name
 
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Tulane athletes became standard bearers after Hurricane Katrina, serving notice that the university would survive and be back on its feet, sooner rather than later. In part four of the "Katrina Remembered" series, athletics director Rick Dickson talks about this monumental task, and the student athletes that took it on.
Views: 659 Tulane University
US GOV is #1 Flood Insurance Provider & program is $25 Billion in Debt
 
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https://www.paypal.me/THORnews This story just keeps getting worse and more sinister. God bless everyone, T The Article https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/articles/ideas-work/national-flood-insurance-program-deep-waters National Flood Insurance Program in Deep Waters “I am afraid we are going to find many more lost than we had thought.” That was how then-president Lyndon B. Johnson tersely characterized the devastation wrought by Hurricane Betsy to a reporter from the New York Times on September 12, 1965 after he surveyed the damage in New Orleans three days after the hurricane made landfall. The storm took the lives of 76 people, and caused some $1.5 billion (11.6 billion in 2017 dollars) in damage, making it the country’s first billion-dollar storm. Betsy’s most enduring impact, however, has been on the nation’s disaster insurance programs. After the devastating Mississippi River Flood of 1927, private insurers largely abandoned the US flood insurance market, leaving congress to put together ad hoc recovery plans for disaster-stricken areas. When Betsy struck in 1965, flood insurance was entirely unavailable to those in the disaster area. The damage wrought by the hurricane, however, provided the political impetus for dramatic change, and in 1968 the nation launched the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), a federally administered program to bring affordable flood insurance to at-risk property owners. Fifty years later, however, one of the world’s longest standing government-run disaster insurance programs is showing signs of strain. The biggest problem with flood insurance is that no one knows exactly what it should cost. And, thanks to generous government subsidies provided through NFIP, few people even know how much it actually does cost. A few experts scattered through the private sector and some of the world’s top universities have produced intricate models with a dizzying array of risk-assessment inputs, all of which continue to mutate due to the continuing uncertainty over the impact of climate change. Some of these models may sync up or overlap; others may not. No one’s really sure at this point because many of these models are proprietary and can’t be shared, while the public models, including those used by the US Federal Emergency Management Agency, may be based on outdated data and are susceptible to political squabbling. “We spend a lot of time at meetings like this talking about financing risk,” Stephen Weinstein, a senior vice president at RenaissanceRe Holdings Ltd., a reinsurance firm, told a mixed crowd of investors, academics, and policy makers on May 2, 2017 at a conference held by Columbia Business School’s Tamer Center for Social Enterprise. “But we spend almost no time talking about the number of Americans who are literally in harm’s way, against risks that are increasing all the time. We’ve lost more Americans to climate-related disasters in the United States since 9/11 than we have to terrorism.” Despite the importance of the program, NFIP faces significant challenges, including immediate concerns over its solvency. Between 2005 and 2012 the program was forced to borrow several billion dollars from the US Treasury to make payments to those affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as Superstorm Sandy — money the Government Accountability Office asserted in its 2017 report that the program would be unlikely to be able to pay back. As it stands, the program is nearly $25 billion in debt. Government-subsidies also obscure market signals, according to Christopher Mayer, a professor of real estate at Columbia Business School, which may have the unintended effect of putting more people in harm’s way. The humanitarian argument for subsidizing at-risk areas would seem to be clear: Without it, those least able to afford the economic shock of a disaster, or to relocate away from high-risk areas, couldn’t afford the coverage that would make it survivable. A 2012 amendment to the law, the serendipitously named Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act, was meant to put NFIP on more solid fiscal footing by gradually allowing rates to rise to reflect actual risk and ceasing coverage for second homes and properties that had been flooded multiple times. The act, however, was partially reversed in 2014 by the equally ominous-sounding Grimm-Waters Act of 2014. In Mayer’s view, these continued subsidies sacrifice long-term economic soundness for potential short-term political gain. Similarly, cities are reluctant to designate any more land than absolutely necessary as high-risk flood zones because, in addition to imposing additional costs on voters, it may scare away developers. In 2015, New York City appealed the new flood maps issued by FEMA, designed to indicate the longer-term risk posed by climate change, which placed an additional 35,000 homes in the city into high-risk areas.
Views: 1286 thornews
South College - Katrina Gibson
 
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South College (Knoxville, TN) graduate Katrina Gibson survived hurricane Katrina in New Orleans and will begin a career in imaging sciences after receiving the 2010 President's Award, the school's highest honor, at the graduation ceremonies held Saturday, June 19, 2010, at the Tennessee Theatre.
Views: 359 South College
Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem After Disaster: Business in New Orleans After Katrina
 
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Tim Williamson is president of The Idea Village, a non-profit based in New Orleans's Warehouse Arts District, that works with entrepreneurs to "ignite innovation by providing strategy, talent and resources to entrepreneurial ventures." A native New Orleanian who lived around the United States before coming home in the 1990s, Tim's mission is bold: make New Orleans America's headquarters of entrepreneurial innovation. Read his interview here http://mercatus.org/sites/default/files/16_casestudy5.pdf and learn more at Mercatus.org http://mercatus.org/gulf-coast-recovery-project Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/CNEZ/
Views: 67 Mercatus Center
Hurricane Communications Webinar - Part 1
 
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Jeff Suggs is the Emergency Management Coordinator for La Porte, TX. After weathering direct hits from Hurricane Ike and sever weather from Hurricane Katrina, he share his experience communicating urgent notifications for everything from evacuation notices to busing and sheltering plans. His team has setup templates and Blackboard MyConnect to ensure each citizen has the information needed when it matters most.
Views: 72 ConnectforGov
Starting Point: Lessons from Hurricane Katrina, 10 Years Later (PCNC August 28, 2015)
 
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Host and commentator Lenny McAllister takes the beginning of “NightTalk: Get To The Point” to reflect upon the much-needed “lessons learned” that America should heed to 10 years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coat. McAllister uses this version of this "Starting Point" commentary to address how the nation can focus on the issues of political efficiency, addressing poverty, and civic accountability so that communities are prepared during times of crisis. The show airs live Friday nights 8pm on the Pittsburgh Cable News Channel. "NightTalk: Get To The Point" airs live Fridays at 8pm on the Pittsburgh Cable News Channel (Comcast channel 35 / Verizon FIOS channel 9) on over 850,000 households in the Pittsburgh television market as the sister station to WPXI, the NBC affiliate in the Pittsburgh market covering 4 states.
Lower Ninth Ward strives to grow strong after Hurricane Katrina
 
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The community is pushing for neighbors to grow their own food since there is no grocery store in the area.
Views: 66 WDSU News
Be a Better Human_ Podcast - Episode 1 - "Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life"
 
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Join Shanna Forrestall of http://www.forrestallconsulting.com as she chats with thought leaders to discuss ideas for small steps we can all take to create major change. Episode 1 - "Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life" - features Dr. Joanne Royer of Change Agents & Associates. https://joanneroyerphd.com/ About "Shanna from Louisiana" Shanna Forrestall, known as “Shanna from Louisiana”, has over twenty years of experience in advertising, marketing and public relations in the US and Canada, and as the industry evolved she has come to focus on the power of social media. Shanna is now based in Pasadena, CA where she provides social media and marketing consulting, along with a range of services including social media setup, cleanup, content creation & strategy, development of custom marketing and digital assets for a variety of corporate and nonprofit clients. Shanna was a professional actress for over 12 years and has been featured in more than 100 film and television projects. She is also an experienced producer with years of experience as an Associate Producer for a variety of television projects for networks like The History Channel and TruTV. She has also produced six short films in the US that tackle social issues, and several video projects in India to support a school for disabled children and to raise awareness on the plight of eunuchs in Indian society. Shanna is now also a Consulting Producer on Restoring Balance: Autism Recovery, a groundbreaking documentary by brain trauma specialist Ryan Hetrick. Shanna is a lifelong humanitarian and is most proud of her non-profit work around the world. Since Hurricane Katrina she has been involved in several large recovery efforts in the south, including the Great Flood of 2016 in Louisiana that affected her hometown of Gonzales and surrounding areas. In the disaster over 450k people lost their homes in a 1000 Year Flood. In August of 2017, she also returned from her honeymoon to help survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, TX. Shanna has partnered with major corporations and local humanitarians to generate hundreds of thousands of dollars in practical resources and cash donations to support families in recovery. She is also very active with a variety of charitable organizations in the Los Angeles area, and is compelled to support programs that assist the homeless and advocate for women and children in crisis (Friends in Deed), empower mentally and physically challenged adults (AMVA, Actors for Autism, FVO), and animal rescue programs (like Kitty Bungalow: Charm School for Wayward Cats where she adopted her own little spoiled fella named ‘Beau Nola’ in honor of New Orleans). Shanna is currently a member of the Women’s City Club of Pasadena, the City Club LA and a member of the Pasadena Business Networking Association. Shanna’s range of experience & references may be best viewed on LinkedIn. Interested in having Shanna speak or teach on social media, emcee an event, be the face of your next commercial campaign, or produce a special project for your team? Contact her today. http://www.forrestallconsulting.com/