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Seroquel Serious Side Effects
 
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I was prescribed Seroquel for Anxiety as well as a possible mood disorder. I had HORRIBLE side effects from Seroquel. I gained over 10 pounds in a week, felt like I had the flu constantly, had horrible headaches, felt like my blood sugar was out of whack, super sleepy but couldn't sleep still, joint pain and swelling, and numbness with tingling in my feet. Then, I woke up to find my face swollen along with 3+ pitting edema in both legs. The Doctor had me stop the Seroquel instantly without weaning down and didn't have me on anything for 3.5 weeks. I felt crazier than I have ever felt in my entire life. I keep on fighting and I know that any of you going through any sort of mental illness can do so too!
Views: 62932 Iva Marie Gutowski
VALPROATE ADVERSE EFFECTS : Anti epileptic drug PHARMACOLOGY
 
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1. How to recollect the ADVERSE effects of VALPROATE ? 2. Mnemonics for ADVERSE effects of VALPROATE . Valproic acid affects chemicals in the body that may be involved in causing seizures. Valproic acid is used to treat various types of seizure disorders. Valproic acid is sometimes used together with other seizure medications. Valproic acid is also used to treat manic episodes related to bipolar disorder (manic depression), and to prevent migraine headaches. Valproic acid may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use valproic acid to prevent migraine headaches if you are pregnant. If you take valproic acid for seizures or manic episodes: Do not start or stop taking the medicine during pregnancy without your doctor's advice. You should not use valproic acid if you have liver disease, a urea cycle disorder, or a genetic disorder such as Alpers' disease or Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (especially in a child younger than 2 years old). Valproic acid can cause liver failure that may be fatal, especially in children under age 2 and in people with liver problems caused by a genetic mitochondrial (MYE-toe-KON-dree-al) disorder. Call your doctor at once if the person taking this medicine has signs of liver or pancreas problems, such as: loss of appetite, upper stomach pain (that may spread to your back), ongoing nausea or vomiting, dark urine, swelling in the face, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). You should not use valproic acid if you are allergic to it, or if you have: liver disease;a urea cycle disorder; ora genetic mitochondrial (MYE-toe-KON-dree-al) disorder such as Alpers' disease or Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, especially in a child younger than 2 years old. Valproic acid can cause liver failure that may be fatal, especially in children under age 2 and in people with liver problems caused by a genetic mitochondrial disorder. To make sure valproic acid is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver problems caused by a genetic mitochondrial disorder;a history of depression, mental illness, or suicidal thoughts or actions;a family history of a urea cycle disorder or infant deaths with unknown cause; orHIV or CMV (cytomegalovirus) infection. Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking valproic acid. Your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits while you are using this medicine. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Do not use valproic acid to prevent migraine headaches if you are pregnant. If you take valproic acid for seizures or manic episodes: This medicine can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects, and may affect cognitive ability (reasoning, intelligence, problem-solving) later in the child's life. However, having a seizure during pregnancy could harm both the mother and the baby. Do not start or stop taking valproic acid during pregnancy without your doctor's advice. Use effective birth control while using valproic acid, and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Tell your doctor if you start or stop using hormonal contraception that contains estrogen (birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings). Estrogen can interact with valproic acid and make it less effective in preventing seizures. Seizure control is very important during pregnancy. The benefit of preventing seizures may outweigh any risks posed by taking valproic acid. There may be other seizure medications that can be more safely used during pregnancy