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Bacitracin test for Streptococcus pyogenes
 
00:51
A lawn of Streptococcus pyogenes shows a clearing zone around a disc containing bacitracin
Views: 32271 markmicrobiology
How to Read and Interpret an Antibiogram
 
13:10
IPRO created the first YouTube video intended to instruct clinicians on how to properly read and interpret an antibiogram as part of a project focused on implementing antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting. The video provides a discussion of the content, interpretation and limitations of an antibiogram in a case based format. The four outpatient cases highlight how an antibiogram can be used as part of the decision making process.
Views: 2726 IPROdotORG
ß-Lactams: Mechanisms of Action and Resistance
 
07:23
Developed and produced by http://www.MechanismsinMedicine.com Animation Description: This animation starts with the explanation of bacterial cell wall synthesis, the process targeted by ß-Lactams. Structurally, most bacteria consist of a cell membrane surrounded by a cell wall and, for some bacteria, an additional outer layer. Internal to the cell membrane is the cytoplasm which contains ribosomes, a nuclear region and in some cases granules and/or vesicles. Depending on the bacterial species, a number of different external structures may be found such as a capsule, flagella and pili. In gram negative bacteria, the gap between the cell membrane and the cell wall is known as the periplasmic space. Most gram positive bacteria do not possess a periplasmic space but have only periplasm where metabolic digestion occurs and new cell peptidoglycan is attached. Peptidoglycan, the most important component of the cell wall, is a polymer made of N-acetyl muramic acid alternating with N-acetyl glucosamine which are cross-linked by chains of four amino acids. The function of the bacterial cell wall is to maintain the characteristic shape of the organism and to prevent the bacterium from bursting when fluid flows into the organism by osmosis. Synthesis of peptidoglycan and ultimately the bacterial cell wall occurs in a number of stages. One of the first stages is the addition of 5 amino acids to N-acetyl muramic acid. Next, N-acetyl glucosamine is added to the N-acetyl muramic acid to form a precursor of peptidoglycan. This peptidoglycan precursor is then transported across the cell membrane to a cell wall acceptor in the periplasm. Once in the periplasm, the peptidoglycan precursors bind to cell wall acceptors, and undergo extensive crosslinking. Two major enzymes are involved in crosslinking: transpeptidase and D-alanyl carboxypeptidase. These enzymes are also known as penicillin binding proteins because of their ability to bind penicillins and cephalosporins. Eventually, several layers of peptidoglycan are formed all of which are crosslinked to create the cell wall. Gram positive bacteria have many more layers than gram negative bacteria and thus have a much thicker cell wall. Beta-lactam antibiotics include all penicillins and cephalosporins that contain a chemical structure called a beta-lactam ring. This structure is capable of binding to the enzymes that cross-link peptidoglycans. Beta-lactams interfere with cross-linking by binding to transpeptidase and D-alanyl carboxypeptidase enzymes, thus preventing bacterial cell wall synthesis. By inhibiting cell wall synthesis, the bacterial cell is damaged. Gram positive bacteria have a high internal osmotic pressure. Without a normal, rigid cell wall, these cells burst when subjected to the low osmotic pressure of their surrounding environment. As well, the antibiotic-penicillin binding protein complex stimulates the release of autolysins that are capable of digesting the existing cell wall. Beta-lactam antibiotics are therefore considered bactericidal agents. Bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics may be acquired by several routes. One of the most important mechanisms is through a process known as transformation. During transformation, chromosomal genes are transferred from one bacterium to another. When a bacterium containing a resistance gene dies, naked DNA is released into the surrounding environment. If a bacterium of sufficient similarity to the dead one is in the vicinity, it will be able to uptake the naked DNA containing the resistance gene. Once inside the bacterium, the resistance gene may be transferred from the naked DNA to the chromosome of the host bacteria by a process known as homologous transformation. Over time, the bacterium may acquire enough of these resistance genes to result in a remodelling of the segment of the host DNA. If this remodelled DNA segment codes for cross-linking enzymes (i.e. penicillin binding proteins), the result is the production of altered penicillin binding proteins. These altered penicillin binding proteins can still cross-link the peptidoglycan layers of the cell wall but have a reduced affinity for beta-lactam antibiotics thus rendering the bacterium resistant to the effects of penicillin and other beta-lactam agents. This transfer process has resulted in penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae through the acquisition of genes from other naturally occurring penicillin-resistant Streptococcus species. A second important mechanism by which bacteria become resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics is by the production of enzymes capable of inactivating or modifying the drug before it has a chance to exert its effect on the bacteria. View animation to read more.
Views: 661621 Mechanisms in Medicine
Lung Infections
 
01:00:17
Lung infections lecture by Conrad Fisher
Views: 563 Alexey Bo
Best Treatment For Citrobacter Freundii Imbalance
 
05:36
This is a bacterial problem. Like many bacteria, there are hundreds of species in your gut, and this one can become really imbalanced and create an overgrowth. Now, Citrobacter is often by default very resistant to different types of antibiotics. Whether you're taking Cephalosporin or Fluoroquinolone or something like Ciprofloxacin. Many different types of antibiotic drugs are given to patients if they come back with a positive for bacterial infection like Citro. Citrobacter is quite smart. Like many bacteria, it actually gets smarter and smarter with many successive generations. Particularly if you take pharmaceutical antibiotics to try and counter this. Some little known advice that people aren't given with antibiotics is never keep taking drugs concurrently for the same infection. It's dumb. Why the hell would you do that? Why would you keep taking another drug? Doctors will say, "Well let's try this one. Let's try that one." What the hell are you doing trying all these different things for? All you're doing is just digging a deeper hole for yourself to fall into that you'll never climb out of eventually. I've spent too much time in my practice trying to fix up the mess created by "Let's give this a try" kind of practitioners. Be very careful. The first shot is the best shot. If you found you've got an infection, of a bacterial overgrowth, be very careful the first time you do a treatment. Consider carefully. Maybe you should take a natural treatment before you consider a pharmaceutical intervention. Because it's a lot easier to ramp things up than it is to ramp things down. Once you've done a lot of collateral damage, you've busted up a lot of beneficial bacteria, you've created a drug resistant form of bacteria, what the heck are you going to try and do to really clean up this mess? My opinion, not that I want to blow my own trumpet: Check out CanXida Remove. This is a product I designed which is proving to be highly successful for the eradication of lots of different types of bacteria. I'm also finding it excellent for resistant types of bacteria like Citrobacter. Why is that so? Because it's a very compound product that contains many different types of antimicrobials in it. Some people will say, "Oil of oregano is the best" or "Tanalbit is the best" or "Plant tannins are the best" or "Grapefruit seed extract is the best." What I did is I spent quite a lot of years doing stool testing on patients, and I've really worked out that many patients come back with bacteria or overgrowths like Citrobacter freundii. I've worked out with the stool panels, we can have a look at the back of the stool test and we can actually see the susceptibility panel. We can see what Citrobacter is very sensitive to, and that was a big part of how I created my product, was looking at thousands of stool tests over a period of a long period of time and working out the best combination of antimicrobials to counter this, and the results are certainly coming back. We're getting really good feedback from many people now with Citrobacter infection that we're slowly turning these infections back to normal. Be careful what you take. Even if you just take one antimicrobial like oil of oregano, you may develop a resistance against one particular type of thing. Just be careful not to routinely take the same natural product or pharmaceutical especially, again and again. It's not a good idea. When you take a very good antimicrobial and you've got a big Citrobacter problem, you'll find initially a big counter response of the body. This can be described by some people as die off. A good product like CanXida Remove will create a strong effect to counter bacteria like Citrobacter. That could include for up to a week, initial discomfort, but that will very quickly disappear, and you'll notice a big change in the comfort of the digestive system. So, rule number one: Think carefully about taking a pharmaceutical drug for a Citrobacter problem. Number two: Why would you take the same medication time and again or keep changing it to different types of medications, whether it's pharmaceutical or natural, to get the effect you're looking for. Number three: your first shot is your best shot. So, when you've got a problem, take something good straight up front, low dose to get used to it, and to test what your reactions are, ramp it up, and then high dose. Take the sustained high push for several weeks, maybe three or four weeks, and then back off and at the same time you can take a good digestive enzyme/probiotic product. Something like CanXida Restore for example can be taking concurrently with Remove, or could be used at the tail end to finish things off and to tidy up the gut. Of course, retest. So if you're positive for Citrobacter, check it out again to make sure that you've nailed this thing.
Views: 7612 Candida Crusher
How To Treat UTI With Home Natural Remedy
 
01:46
http://www.uticures.com Natural UTI Remdy Report. Our body will also react better with natural treatments compared to medication or drugs. Home remedy uses natural treatment which can be far more effective when used correctly.
Views: 606734 MarkAdwood
Urine Trouble
 
52:33
When should you commit to getting urine? When can you wait? When should you forgo testing altogether?   When do I get urine? Symptoms – either typical dysuria, urgency, frequency in a verbal child, or non-descript abdominal pain or vomiting in a well appearing child. Fever – but first look for an obvious alternative source, especially viral signs or symptoms. No obvious source? Risk stratify before “just getting a urine”. In a low risk child, with obviously very vigilant parents, who is well appearing, you may choose not to test now, and ensure close follow up. Bag or cath? The short answer is: always cath, never bag. (Pros and cons in audio) What is the definition of a UTI? According to the current clinical practice guideline by the AAP, the standard definition of a urinary tract infection is the presence of BOTH pyuria AND at least 50 000 colonies per mL of a single uropathogen. Making the diagnosis in the ED: The presence of WBCs with a threshold of 5 or greater WBCs per HPF is required. What else goes into the urinalysis that may be helpful? Pearl: nitrites are poorly sensitive in children.  It takes 4 hours for nitrites to form, and most children this age do no hold their urine. Pearl: the enhanced urinalysis is the addition of a gram stain.  A positive gram stain has a LR+ of 87 in infants less than 60 days, according to a study by Dayan et al. in Pediatric Emergency Care. When can I just call it pyelonephritis? In an adult, we look for UTI plus evidence of focal upper tract involvement, like CVA tenderness to percussion or systemic signs like nausea, vomiting, or fever.  It is usually straightforward. It’s for this reason that the literature uses the term “febrile UTI” for children.  Fever is very sensitive, but not specific in children. The ill-appearing child has pyelonephritis.   The well-appearing child likely has a “febrile UTI”, without upper involvement.  However, undetected upper tract involvement may be made in retrospect via imaging, if done. How should I treat UTIs? For simple lower tract disease, treat for at least 7 days.  There is no evidence to support 7 versus 10 versus 14 days.  My advice: use 7-10 days as your range for simple febrile UTI in children. Pyelonephritis should be treated for a longer duration.  Treat pyelonephritis for 10-14 days. What should we give them? Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (Bactrim) is falling out of favor, mostly because isolates in many communities are resistant.  There is an association of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) with Bactrim use.  This may be confounded by its prior popularity; any antibiotic can cause SJS, but there are more case reports with Bactrim. Cephalexin (Keflex): 25 mg/kg dose, either BID or TID.  It is easy on the stomach, rarely interacts with other meds, has high efficacy against E. coli, and most importantly, cephalexin has good parenchymal penetration. Nitrofurantoin is often used in pregnant women, because the drug tends to concentrate locally in the urine.  However, blood and tissue concentrations are weak.  It may be ineffective if there is some sub-clinical upper tract involvement. Cefdinir is a 3rd generation cephalosporin available by mouth, given at 14 mg/kg in either one dose daily or divided BID, up to max of 600 mg.  This may be an option for an older child who has pyelonephritis, but is well enough to go home. Whom should we admit? The first thing to consider is age.  Any infant younger than 2 months should be admitted for a febrile UTI.  Their immune systems and physiologic reserve are just not sufficient to localize and fight off infections reliably. The truth is, for serious bacterial illness like pneumonia, UTI, or severe soft tissue infections, be careful with any infant less than 4-6 months of age. Of course, the unwell child – whatever his age – he should be admitted.  Think about poor feeding, irritability, dehydration – in that case, just go with your gut and call it pyelonephritis, and admit. What is the age cut-off for a urine culture? In adults, we think of urine culture only for high-risk populations, such as pregnant women, the immunocompromised, those with renal abnormalities, the neurologically impaired, or the critically ill, to name a few. In children, it’s a little simpler.  Do it for everyone. Who is everyone? Think of the urine rule of 10s: 10% of young febrile children will have a UTI 10% of UAs will show no evidence of pyuria Routine urine culture in all children with suspected or confirmed UTI up to about age 10 What do I do then with urine culture results? From a quality improvement and safety perspective, consider making this a regular assignment to a qualified clinician. Check once in 24-48 hours to find...
Views: 39 Tim Horeczko
NHSN CAUTI Definition with Case Studies - 2015
 
01:15:06
National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Training 2015. Define 2015 CDC/NHSN CAUTI and key concepts used for CAUTI surveillance. Identify the correct way to count indwelling urinary catheter days to determine infection association. Identify the correct way to distinguish between a single UTI with sequential positive urine cultures and separate UTIs. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/2017trainingvideos/nhsn-uti-15.mp4
UTI and Pyelonephritis - USMlE step 2 Review
 
09:24
This is a review of the basics of diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis for medical students and others learning medicine.
Views: 22217 Kendrick Johnson
G2Voice #082 Are toxins causing most allergies or intolerances? (4-8-2018)
 
01:57:20
This week we are talking about how we think toxins are causing allergies. This weeks newsletter: https://mmsnews.is/463-g2voice-082-are-toxins-causing-most-allergies-or-intolerances-4-5-2018 Donate: http://www.genesis2church.is/donate Genesis II Church Documentary: https://youtu.be/BQb6CNtSN2s G2Voice Website: G2Voice.is New Book site and New Ebook https://g2churchbooks.org/ Genesis II Church Newsletter Subscription: http://genesis2church.is/ MMS Health Recovery Guidebook: http://jimhumble.is/bookstore/mms-health-recovery-guidebook Daniel’s Petition: https://www.change.org/p/public-petition-for-sua-sponte-call-for-rehearing-en-banc How to Make MMS: Sodium Chlorite 22.4% (Master Mineral Solution) https://youtu.be/6rMPxPzZWzY How to dilute HCL Hydrochloric acid from 35% to 4% and 5% https://youtu.be/VaAYhOZXoOs Starting Procedure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhCyJO1aVkE Protocol 1000: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHtLj1YDp3g (Daily Protocol Bottle): https://youtu.be/bmgRZ86BPV0 Protocol 1000+: https://youtu.be/DBvB79pjYbU Protocol 2000: https://youtu.be/HgOC4ZwaAWs Protocol 4000: https://youtu.be/sQ7oyA9K5Wg Spray Bottle Protocol: https://youtu.be/83RG6NT5taQ MMS Survival Kit: https://youtu.be/L5w4lg8pFv4 For Sacramental Products contact us at: jordan@genesis2church.is E-mail or http://www.genesis2church.is/acquiring-mms Home video course: http://www.genesis2church.is/course Facebook G2Voice: https://www.facebook.com/G2voice.is/ Facebook Genesis II Church: https://www.facebook.com/GenesisIIChurch/ Youtube G2Voice: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQRYRsUj7A_0S36nB1haEAg YouTube Genesis II Church: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFH2DZShFVQvrOjVkkX8r-g Twitter: https://twitter.com/G2Voice1 Sacramental Guidance (English): Mark@genesis2church.is Orientation Sacramental (Espanol): Joseph@genesis2church.is Chlorine Dioxide Informational links: MMSWIKI: http://mmswiki.is/index.php/Main_Page How Chlorine Dioxide works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaBURpoIWSo BioFilms Killed by CD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VM_mteWQrPg Chlorine Dioxide for Pathogen Control: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ixk4mVJNotg G2Voice contact: info@g2voice.is Support: support@genesis2church.is
Views: 623 G2 Voice
Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Case Studies
 
44:38
This course allows the user to accurately apply the NHSN definitions and criteria in case scenarios for CAUTI. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at http://streaming.cdc.gov/vod.php?id=17ceaaba44a88f8b0c92881b324ec03c20130311115046105
Practical Pharmacology - Module 1, Session 3
 
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Practical Pharmacology - Module 1, Session 3 with Dr. Anne Zajicek This is Module 1, Session 3, of the NIH Clinical Center's "Principles of Clinical Pharmacology" course. The course is a lecture series covering the fundamentals of clinical pharmacology as a translational scientific discipline focused on rational drug development and utilization in therapeutics. If you have any questions or need additional information regarding the Principles of Clinical Pharmacology course, please email the course coordinator at: cc-od_clinp@mail.nih.gov.
Views: 1837 NIH Clinical Center
Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) with Case Studies (Part II).
 
45:21
This video is for everyone who is collecting or reporting NHSN Surveillance. This course reviews the protocol, definition, and key terms associated with CAUTI. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at http://streaming.cdc.gov/vod.php?id=65f6cfa2830c0d9f0ba1af992d87480920140408075408905
Urine Trouble
 
52:33
When should you commit to getting urine? When can you wait? When should you forgo testing altogether? When do I get urine? Symptoms – either typical dysuria, urgency, frequency in a verbal child, or non-descript abdominal pain or vomiting in a well appearing child. Fever – but first look for an obvious alternative source, especially viral signs or symptoms. No obvious source? Risk stratify before “just getting a urine”. In a low risk child, with obviously very vigilant parents, who is well appearing, you may choose not to test now, and ensure close follow up. Bag or cath? The short answer is: always cath, never bag. (Pros and cons in audio) What is the definition of a UTI? According to the current clinical practice guideline by the AAP, the standard definition of a urinary tract infection is the presence of BOTH pyuria AND at least 50 000 colonies per mL of a single uropathogen. Making the diagnosis in the ED: The presence of WBCs with a threshold of 5 or greater WBCs per HPF is required. What else goes into the urinalysis that may be helpful? Pearl: nitrites are poorly sensitive in children.  It takes 4 hours for nitrites to form, and most children this age do no hold their urine. Pearl: the enhanced urinalysis is the addition of a gram stain.  A positive gram stain has a LR+ of 87 in infants less than 60 days, according to a study by Dayan et al. in Pediatric Emergency Care. When can I just call it pyelonephritis? In an adult, we look for UTI plus evidence of focal upper tract involvement, like CVA tenderness to percussion or systemic signs like nausea, vomiting, or fever.  It is usually straightforward. It’s for this reason that the literature uses the term “febrile UTI” for children.  Fever is very sensitive, but not specific in children. The ill-appearing child has pyelonephritis.   The well-appearing child likely has a “febrile UTI”, without upper involvement.  However, undetected upper tract involvement may be made in retrospect via imaging, if done. How should I treat UTIs? For simple lower tract disease, treat for at least 7 days.  There is no evidence to support 7 versus 10 versus 14 days.  My advice: use 7-10 days as your range for simple febrile UTI in children. Pyelonephritis should be treated for a longer duration.  Treat pyelonephritis for 10-14 days. What should we give them? Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim (Bactrim) is falling out of favor, mostly because isolates in many communities are resistant.  There is an association of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) with Bactrim use.  This may be confounded by its prior popularity; any antibiotic can cause SJS, but there are more case reports with Bactrim. Cephalexin (Keflex): 25 mg/kg dose, either BID or TID.  It is easy on the stomach, rarely interacts with other meds, has high efficacy against E. coli, and most importantly, cephalexin has good parenchymal penetration. Nitrofurantoin is often used in pregnant women, because the drug tends to concentrate locally in the urine.  However, blood and tissue concentrations are weak.  It may be ineffective if there is some sub-clinical upper tract involvement. Cefdinir is a 3rd generation cephalosporin available by mouth, given at 14 mg/kg in either one dose daily or divided BID, up to max of 600 mg.  This may be an option for an older child who has pyelonephritis, but is well enough to go home. Whom should we admit? The first thing to consider is age.  Any infant younger than 2 months should be admitted for a febrile UTI.  Their immune systems and physiologic reserve are just not sufficient to localize and fight off infections reliably. The truth is, for serious bacterial illness like pneumonia, UTI, or severe soft tissue infections, be careful with any infant less than 4-6 months of age. Of course, the unwell child – whatever his age – he should be admitted.  Think about poor feeding, irritability, dehydration – in that case, just go with your gut and call it pyelonephritis, and admit. What is the age cut-off for a urine culture? In adults, we think of urine culture only for high-risk populations, such as pregnant women, the immunocompromised, those with renal abnormalities, the neurologically impaired, or the critically ill, to name a few. In children, it’s a little simpler.  Do it for everyone. Who is everyone? Think of the urine rule of 10s: 10% of young febrile children will have a UTI 10% of UAs will show no evidence of pyuria Routine urine culture in all children with suspected or confirmed UTI up to about age 10 What do I do then with urine culture results? From a quality improvement and safety perspective, consider making this a regular assignment to a qualified clinician. Check once in 24-48 hours to find...
Views: 44 Tim Horeczko
Critical Care Paramedic 6:  Introduction to Pharmacology - Part 2
 
01:38:04
This Wisconsin Critical Care Paramedic module covers pharmacology as associated with critical care interfacility transports.
Views: 4039 WCTCEMS
Renal Urinary Lecture
 
01:18:16
Views: 192 Alex Sargsyan
Demystifying Medicine 2017: Sight-threatening Uveitis: a 2-way Street between Research and Clinic
 
01:34:57
Demystifying Medicine 2017: Sight-threatening Uveitis: a 2-way Street between Research and Clinic Air date: Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 4:00:00 PM Category: Demystifying Medicine Runtime: 01:34:56 Description: The Demystifying Medicine Lecture Series is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their applications to major human diseases. Each lecture will feature a presentation on a major disease, including current research and advancements on treatments. For more information go to https://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Sapna Gangaputra, MD, MPH, NEI, NIH and Mary Mattapallil, PhD, NEI, NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23211
Views: 194 nihvcast
HSN | Healthy Innovations 02.03.2017 - 10 AM
 
01:00:01
Infomerical Items Health Prices shown on the previously recorded video may not represent the current price. View hsn.com to view the current selling price.SHOP NOW http://www.hsn.com
Views: 142 HSNtv
Living The History - Emil J. Freireich, M.D.
 
57:57
This lecture is one in a series of nine monthly interviews conducted during the 2015-2016 academic year. The series is sponsored by the Houston History of Medicine Society, in collaboration with UTHealth’s McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics, and Baylor College of Medicine. This year’s theme is “Living History: Made at the Texas Medical Center” and includes interviews with researchers, physicians, faculty and patients who contributed to, witnessed or were involved in major medical events and changes from the mid-twentieth century to the present.
Demystifying Medicine 2014 - Pertussis (Whooping Cough): A Lesson in Vaccines
 
01:20:19
Demystifying Medicine 2014 - Pertussis (Whooping Cough): A Lesson in Vaccines Air date: Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 4:00:00 PM Category: Demystifying Medicine Runtime: 01:20:18 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: John Robbins, MD, NICHD, NIH; Alexandra Freeman, MD, NIAID, NIH Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18289
Views: 646 nihvcast
2014 Demystifying Medicine - Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections
 
01:48:41
Worldwide Emergence of Drug-Resistant Infections and What's Being Done About It Air date: Tuesday, January 07, 2014, 4:00:00 PM Runtime: 01:48:41 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Anthony Fauci, MD (NIAID) Jeffrey Taubenberger, MD, PhD (NIAID) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18222 Runtime: 01:41:10 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Mark Hoon, PhD (NIDCR) Irwin Arias, MD (NICHD/CC) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18231
Views: 511 nihvcast