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Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs COULD and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the correct use of ‘could’ and 'would’. In this lesson, I will teach you how to use these two modal verbs without mistakes. There is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. OK, there are three main differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’ that you need to know. So let’s start with the first one: This is in the use of the past tense. ‘Could’ is the past tense of ‘can’ and ‘would’ is the past tense of ‘will’. Take this sentence: “I can run a mile in 10 minutes.” This means I have this ability (to run a mile within 10 minutes). This is in the present tense but we can change it to the past by saying “I could run a mile in 10 minutes when I was younger.” It means I had the ability in the past but I don’t have it now. In this next example: “I know we will win the match.” So maybe we’re on the same team, and I tell you “I know we will win.” I’m confident. But if the match happened in the past (it’s already finished), and I want to say that I was confident, I can say “I knew we would win the match.” Here, ‘will’ becomes ‘would’. This is the first difference. The second difference relates to talking about possible situations and imaginary situations. Take this example: “It could rain tonight.” So I look at the sky and I see clouds. And I make a prediction about the future. Here’s another sentence – “John isn’t answering his phone. He could be busy.” That is I’m saying that it’s possible that he’s busy. Notice that in both of these sentences, ‘could’ is not a past tense form – it’s just used to show possibility. But I cannot use ‘would’ for this purpose. So, these are possible situations, but when we talk about imaginary situations, we prefer to use ‘would’. For example, “If I had a million dollars, I would buy a beach house.” Again, don’t be confused by the past tense. We say “If I had” and “I would buy” because we want to show that this is imagination – it’s not reality (I don’t have a million dollars). Here’s another example: “If Shirley worked hard, she would get a promotion.” This means she doesn’t work hard (she’s lazy), so she’s not going to get a promotion. Now, in both of these sentences, we can use ‘could’ to show imaginary ability but it’s less common. ‘Would’ is used a lot more when it comes to imaginary situations. This is the second difference. Let’s now move on to the third and final difference – and this is in polite expressions. There are four functions that are important for us – making suggestions, offers, requests and asking for permission. First, to make suggestions, we normally use ‘could’ as in this example: “We could try that new Italian restaurant.” So imagine that we’re planning to have dinner together and I make this suggestion. Here, using ‘would’ is wrong. But to make an offer, we prefer ‘would’. For example: “Would you like some tea?” That means, I have tea and I’m asking you if you want some. Here, we cannot use ‘could’. But making requests is different because it is possible to use both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could you open the window, please?” You can also say, “Would you open the window, please?” although this is very formal and polite. However, we also sometimes use “Would you mind…” as in “Would you mind opening the window?” This is a request, but this phrase is fixed – you cannot say “Could you mind…?” And when we ask for permission, again there are expressions with both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could I borrow your car for a couple of days?” Maybe I’m saying this to a friend, so I’m asking my friend for permission to use his or her car. I can also say, “Would it be OK if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” or “Would you mind if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” ‘Would you mind’ can be used to ask permission as well. Notice that when we use ‘would it be OK if’ or ‘would you mind if’, we use the verb in the past tense – ‘borrowed’, but that’s just a grammar rule – we’re still asking for permission for the future. Alright, these are the differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’, and if you’re ready, it’s now time for the test. There are eight sentences on the screen. In each one, I want you to choose the correct word – ‘could’ or ‘would’. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers. Let me know how many you got correct in the comments.
Views: 777006 Learn English Lab
How to THINK in English - STOP Translating in Your Head & Speak Fluently Like a Native
 
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Learn 3 easy exercises to STOP translating in your head and start thinking 100% in English. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 Also check out - 1 Simple Trick to Become Fluent in English (JAM Exercise): https://goo.gl/G6FEJp For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: I can speak English, but before I say anything, I have to make a sentence in my native language, translate that into English, and then say it. I feel like I’m not speaking fluently because of this. That is one of the most common complaints I hear from my students. So in this lesson, I’m going to teach you three exercises that will help you to stop translating in your head. These exercises will make you think 100% in English and speak fluently without hesitation. So, let’s jump right into it. Here is exercise number one – Make sentences in your head. This is the number one fastest way to start thinking in English. Throughout your day, make sentences about what is happening around you. For example, let’s say that you’re sitting on the bus and you’re going somewhere. In your head, you can start talking in English – “I like this seat, it’s nice and comfortable. Look at that couple sitting over there – what are they doing? They look very happy. They’re joking and laughing about something. Anyway, let’s look out the window. Oh, what a beautiful park. I wish I could visit it sometime.” And so on. You can do this in any situation: when you’re at home, when you’re bored at work or school, when you’re waiting at the doctor’s office, when you’re walking in the park and so on. And it will train your brain to make sentences in English. Now, while you are doing this, if you start translating, it’s OK – don’t get disappointed, because as you keep practicing, you will collect more and more sentences for everyday situations, and over time, you will translate less. Remember to do this exercise many times every day – make it a habit to regularly make sentences in your head. Exercise number two is prepare sentences for conversations. For this exercise, think about a conversation that you are going to have in the future, and come up with sentences that you can use. For example, if there’s going to be a meeting in your workplace tomorrow, what would be some useful sentences? Well, if you’re going to present an idea to your colleagues, you might say – “I strongly believe this will help our sales.” a-ha! Keep that in mind to use tomorrow. Maybe you have a colleague (let’s say his name is Teddy) and he always interrupts you while you talk – if he does that tomorrow, you can say “Hold on, Teddy, let me finish!” – there’s another sentence. In this way, for upcoming conversations, you can prepare a lot of sentences and have them in your mental store – and you can even write them down to review later. As you do this exercise more and more, you will be able to use these sentences in many future conversations automatically without thinking too much. So take time to regularly prepare sentences for conversations. Exercise number three is recap your day. Do you know the meaning of ‘recap’? Recap means to remember and summarize something – in this case, your day. So this is an exercise you should do at the end of the day – maybe just before you go to bed – or you can even do this as you’re lying in bed before you go to sleep. Imagine that you’re telling a friend about your day in English – you might say “Today was a regular day for the most part. One interesting thing that happened in college was that a friend of mine told me she’s got an internship interview coming up in two days. So I helped her prepare for it.” and so on and so forth, you get the idea. You can also make sentences about how you felt about the different things that happened, you can say what you expect to happen tomorrow etc. Aim to do this for about 5-10 minutes before you go to sleep. What I like about this exercise is that you can do it at the same time every day, which means it’s very easy to make this a habit. And so all this practice in making sentences will help you think in English automatically. OK, those are my top three exercises for learning to think in English – make sentences in your head throughout the day, prepare sentences for conversations, and recap your day before you go to sleep. As a bonus tip, there’s one more powerful exercise that you can use to build your fluency, and it’s called JAM. This is short for Just-A-Minute, and it’s a fantastic speaking exercise that you can do by yourself to improve your fluency. If you want to learn it, I have a lesson just on this exercise - you will find the link in the description, so make sure to check it out.
Views: 855809 Learn English Lab
1 Simple Trick to Become Fluent in English - the JAM Technique - How to Be a Confident Speaker
 
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Learn how to become a FLUENT and CONFIDENT English speaker by spending just 10 minutes a day. This is the JAM technique. For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome back. In this video, I’m going to teach you one simple trick that you can use to become a fluent English speaker by spending just 10 minutes a day. The best part about this is that you don’t need a partner – you can do this by yourself. This is a technique that has worked for many of my students and if you do what I tell you in this video, I guarantee that you will become more fluent in English. So what is this trick? Well, it’s a technique known as JAM. Uh, no, not that kind of jam. This is actually a little fluency game based on a show that airs on BBC radio. The reason it’s called JAM is because it’s short for Just A Minute. This game has three stages. So here’s how you play it: You’re going to talk about a topic for one minute. That is, you’re going to give a speech without any preparation. So you just pick a topic - you can either take general topics like sports, hobbies, friends, books etc. or you can choose a question. For example, what is your favorite mode of transport? And once you have a topic, you speak. Now when you do, there are some rules: The first rule is that you cannot stop speaking. You must talk for the full minute. If you have to pause to catch your breath, it’s OK, but you cannot pause for more than three seconds. Even if you say nonsense or you say something unrelated to the topic it doesn’t matter. You’re just going to keep talking. So that’s rule number one. Rule number two is you cannot repeat the same ideas. That means you can’t just say the same things over and over and over again – this isn’t pronunciation practice – it’s fluency development, so no repetition of the same ideas. And rule number three is no writing – you cannot make any notes while you are speaking, you must only concentrate on speaking. These are just the three rules. So to begin, you need a timer, this can be on your smartphone for example. You start stage one by starting the timer and you speak until the one minute is reached. I’m going to give you an example of how to do this. I’m going to take this question: “What is your favorite mode of transport?” and I’m going to speak for a minute on this topic. Now I haven’t done any preparation, so let’s see how I do. OK, so what’s my favorite mode of transport? I would have to say that it’s the train. That’s because um, actually, you get to see a lot of nice scenery, beautiful landscapes and things like that. And you know, train journeys generally tend to be longer than other types of, or rather, other modes of transport. You can see I’m really struggling for ideas but I can’t stop, I have to keep going so I’m saying whatever comes to mind, that’s no problem. But back to the topic at hand, yeah, train journeys because they’re longer, they’re more relaxing. And one last thing I want to mention is that I’ve had the opportunity to meet interesting people and make friends on many train journeys. As a kid I used to ride the train a lot with my family. We used to go to lots of places by train and it’s actually something that I really enjoyed. Phew! That was hard. But that’s OK. That’s the whole point of this exercise. That was stage one. Now we’re going to move on to stage two. Here’s where we’re really going to start building our fluency. The first part of stage two is making notes – so you can use a paper and pen now. And you’re going to think back to the speech that you just gave, and collect ideas you came up with. In my speech, I remember that I had three ideas: The first was that on train journeys, you get to see a lot of beautiful scenery. The second idea was that train journeys are longer, so they’re more relaxing. The third idea was that you get to meet interesting people and make friends. So once you have these ideas down, you’re going to repeat the exercise. That means, you’re going to set your timer for one minute and you’re going to speak again on the same topic, but now, you can use your notes to guide you. You will notice that this time, you are actually able to speak more fluently because you have some good ideas on paper, and you will be able to expand on your ideas and give more information. Once the timer hits one minute, you stop. And we move on to stage three. Just like in stage two, you’re going to go to paper and pen, but this time, you’re going to add more ideas to your notes based on your second speech. I added some ideas like this. So now – for one final time, you’re going to speak again. This is your final speech. So you set your timer for one minute, you use your notes and speak. I’m going to give you my final speech based on my notes so you can see the difference.
Views: 4822729 Learn English Lab
5 Things to Practice Every Day to Improve Your English - Better Communication Skills - Become Fluent
 
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In this lesson, you will learn the 5 things you must do daily to improve your communication skills. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. 50 Words You Are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f 2. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. 1 Simple Trick to Become FLUENT in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0qT4cK-wtk&list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix 4. All PRONUNCIATION lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f 5. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 7. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 837200 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of CAN and COULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs CAN and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello there. You know, I get this question all the time – both from my students in my classes and on YouTube – what is the difference between ‘can’ and ‘could’? Well, in this lesson, I will teach you the three main differences between these modal verbs and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. The very first thing you should know is the basic use of ‘can’. This verb is used to show ability. Here are some examples: I can play the guitar. He can lift heavy weights. She can beat anyone at chess! So, all of these express ability. What about what ‘could’ then? Well, ‘could’ is just the past tense of can. I can say: I could play the guitar when I was in school. That means, I had the ability in the past, but now I can’t play the guitar because it’s been a long time and I’m out of practice. Here a couple more examples: He could lift heavy weights until he had the accident. She could beat anyone at chess in her prime! ‘In her prime’ means in her best years. Maybe when she was younger and was playing competitively. So in these sentences – ‘can’ shows present ability, and ‘could’ shows past ability. This is the first difference between the two words. The second difference is when we want to talk about possibility. To talk about what is possible, we normally use ‘could’ and not ‘can’. Now, imagine that you and me, we’re both waiting for a train at a train station. It’s time for the train to arrive but we don’t see it. So I might say: Hmm, the train could be late. So I’m making a guess about the current (or the present) situation, saying what is possible. Here’s another one: If you don’t study, you could fail the exam. Are you sure to fail the exam? No. You could pass. But I’m saying that it’s possible that if you don’t study, you’ll fail. Notice that this sentence talks about future possibility. Ah, but I have a question – we just talked about present and future possibility. Can we talk about past possibility? Yes, we can. Here’s an example: Robert could have gotten the job if he had gone to the interview. So what do we understand from that? Well, there was a job interview. It was possible for Robert to go to the interview and get the job. But he didn’t go. So he didn’t get the job. Now, as I said before, we use ‘could’ in all these sentences to talk about what’s possible in the past, present, and future, but there is one situation where you can use ‘can’ and that is when you want to talk about general possibility. For example: You can catch a cold if you go out in the rain. Traveling across Europe can be quite expensive. You can see that these are just general statements about what is possible in the world. In this case, it’s OK to use ‘can’, but this use is less common. Normally, when we talk about possibility in our lives we use ‘could’. Remember that. Alright, let’s now move on to the final use of ‘can’ and ‘could’, and this is in polite expressions when we talk to people. There are four situations you need to know about. The first is making suggestions. For this purpose, we use ‘could’. Here are some examples: We could try that new Italian restaurant tonight. You could ask your sister to lend you some money. In the first sentence, I’m making a suggestion about where we can have dinner. In the second, I’m suggesting that if you need money, why don’t you ask your sister? Using ‘could’ just makes it very polite. The second situation is making requests. Here, both ‘can’ and ‘could’ are possible: Can you pass me the salt? Could you pass me the salt, please? Or on the phone: Can I speak to Rahul? Could I speak to Rahul, please? Did you notice that I said ‘please’ at the end of the sentences with ‘could’? That’s because ‘could’ is more polite than ‘can’. So if you are in a formal situation, like if you’re talking to your boss or other superior and you want to be very polite, use ‘could’. If you’re with friends or family, then ‘can’ is fine. Our next function is making offers: Can I get you something to drink? Could I get you something to drink, sir? Can I help you with that? Could I help you with that, madam? Again, notice the extra politeness with ‘could’. Finally, the last conversational situation is when we want to ask for permission. Here are some sentences: Can I borrow your pen? Could I borrow your pen, please? Can I take the day off tomorrow? Could I take the day off tomorrow? If you’re very friendly with your boss at work, you would use ‘can’, but if your boss is very strict, then you would use ‘could’.
Views: 142516 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 588697 Learn English Lab
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1577358 Learn English Lab
PAST SIMPLE vs. PRESENT PERFECT - What's the Difference? - #1 Most Common Error - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, you will learn how to use the PAST SIMPLE and PRESENT PERFECT tenses correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome back. In this lesson, I will show you how to avoid the most common mistake that people make with the past simple and present perfect tenses, and how to use the two tenses correctly. We will do an exercise to really understand the concept, and there is a quiz to test your understanding. So let’s start. Have a look at these five sentences. Some of the sentences are wrong. Stop the video, try to make the corrections, then play the video again and check. Alright, actually, I tricked you a little bit with that. All of these sentences are wrong. That’s because, they all talk about a single, finished action in the past. You can see this on the timeline. The action can be at any time in the past – it can be 1998 or it can be last week or even yesterday. But if you mention the time for a finished action, then you MUST use the past simple – not the present perfect. Notice that in all of these sentences, there is a strong focus on the time when the action happened. So when do you use the present perfect? You can use it if the action happened recently, and you want to focus on the action and not the time. In our five sentences, the first three are not recent, they happened further back in the past. But if I bought a house just two weeks ago, or last week, I can say “I have bought a house.” That means I have bought the house recently. So if I say to you, “Hey guess what! I have bought a house!” then I am giving you good news. I’m focusing on buying the house. I’m not talking about the time because it’s not important. If you want to know the time, you can ask “When did you buy it?” Then I can say “I bought it two weeks ago” or “I bought it last week.” Notice, again, to mention the time, we use the past simple. Alright, I’m now going to give you a test to see if you can use these two tenses correctly. Just remember: if the past time is important, then use the past simple. If the time is not important, use the present perfect. You see three dialogues on the screen. In each sentence, I want you to choose the correct form of the verb. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, let’s discuss the answers. Number one is “Hey Sabina, your package has arrived. Here, Ruth is giving news, so there’s no need to mention the time. For this reason, we use the present perfect tense. In number two, “When did it arrive?” We want to use the past simple here because this question asks about the specific time that the action happened. Number three is “It arrived this morning.” because here Ruth says exactly when it happened – this morning, so the past simple is correct. Number four – “Hi Paul. Great news. I have passed my exams.” In number five, “Congrats! When did the results come out?” Number six is “They came out last night”. Number seven is “Have you ever been to Argentina?” Here, we don’t mention a time because the question asks about life experience. The time is not important. So it’s like asking: “In your life, have you ever visited Argentina?” ‘Been’ means ‘visited’ here. Number eight is “No, I haven’t. Have you?” And number nine – “Yes, I went there on vacation in 2010.” Here, we want the past simple because the time is mentioned – 2010. How many answers did you get right? Let me know in the comments section below. I’d like to thank five of our viewers for sending in the request for this lesson: Michael Cygnus, Sourav Sagar, Alberto Linhares, Yogesh Dwivedi, and Manish Chauthani. Alright, click the subscribe button to get more FREE English lessons, and I will see you in another lesson soon.
Views: 85585 Learn English Lab
1 Simple Method to Increase Your Vocabulary | The 3R Technique | How to Improve Your Vocabulary
 
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Learn 1 simple method to increase your vocabulary. This is the 3R technique. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you 1 simple method that you can use to increase your vocabulary. This is the technique that I teach my students, and this is also what I use personally to learn new words – so I know that this works. So what is this technique? Well, it’s the 3R method. It’s called 3R because there are three steps: Read, Record and Review. I will show you how to do all three of these correctly to get the best results. So let’s talk about the first step: Read. If there’s one secret to building your vocabulary, it’s reading. There is simply no better way. You should aim to read for an hour per day. If that’s difficult, do at least half an hour, i.e. 30 minutes but one hour per day will give you the most benefit. Now I’m not talking about reading the newspaper or studying textbooks. That kind of reading is good but it’s not the best way to learn new words. For that, you need to read what is interesting. So here’s an idea: pick something that you’re really interested in. Like sports, movies, music, cars, fitness, fashion, electronics etc. - whatever you feel passionate about. Then find material that you will enjoy reading. Some great examples are magazines, novels, short stories or biographies related to your topic. And don’t forget the internet – one of my favorite places for reading online is Wikipedia. There are millions of articles on this site and whatever your topic of interest is, you can go on Wikipedia and find articles to read. Now, there’s something really important. When you read (whether it’s books or online material), there will be many words that are difficult – that you don’t understand. But don’t look up every single one of these in a dictionary. Because that will distract you and make you bored. Instead, your focus should be to just understand the overall idea of what you are reading. For any difficult words, try to guess the meaning from the surrounding information. If you cannot, mark them with a pencil, or write them down and you can come back to them after you finish reading. After you have finished reading, you move on to step 2 – record. This is where you collect new words. So now, you go back to the text you read and find words to learn – there are two types of words that you can learn – unknown words (words that you don’t know), and inactive words (these are words that you have seen before but you’re not sure how to use). Aim to collect about 5-10 new words every day. Once you have the words, you’re going to note them down in a notebook, on your computer (in a Microsoft Word or Excel file) or even your smartphone (there are many apps that will let you save and learn vocabulary). Start by taking your first word and look it up in a dictionary. I personally prefer to use online dictionaries like Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster. And now, you can start to record the word. Let’s look at the best way to do that. In your notebook or file, first write the word - let’s say ‘creative’ is the word you’re learning. From your dictionary, you should then write what part of speech it is (that is, whether it’s a noun, verb, adjective, adverb etc.). This word is an adjective. Then you write its definition – ‘creative’ means ‘having the ability to produce original ideas’ - it can describe people or activities. Then you note any example sentences that you can find or you can make sentences of your own. Here are a couple of examples: “Frank Zappa was a highly creative musician.” “Children enjoy doing creative activities.” Along with this, you should also note down the correct pronunciation of the word in phonetic symbols. This word is pronounced /kri ˈeɪ.tɪv/. There are three syllables – /kri/, /eɪ/, and /tɪv/ with the stress on /eɪ/ – /kriˈeɪ.tɪv/. You might not know these symbols very well, that’s OK. With the dictionary, practice the correct pronunciation a few times, then copy the symbols. Over time, you will become comfortable with them. It’s also a good idea to make a note of the reference – that is, where you learned the word: which book, website etc. Because, later, when you are reviewing the word, you can more easily recall where you saw it, and you can also go to the same website or book if you want to check how it’s used. You should also try to find and note down the different forms of the word. For example, we said that the word ‘creative’ is an adjective. But it has other forms too.
Views: 672072 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of 'SUPPOSED TO' - With Examples, Exercises and Quiz - English Grammar
 
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Learn the correct use of 'SUPPOSED TO'. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix All examples from the lesson: Form: be + supposed to + main verb (base form) I + am supposed to (present) / was supposed to (past) He/She/It + is supposed to (present) / was supposed to (past) You/We/They + are supposed to (present) / were supposed to (past) Uses 1. Duty, responsibility, obligation You are supposed to listen during the lecture, not talk. Why are you late? You were supposed to be here at 9 o' clock. I am supposed to give a speech at my best friend's wedding next week. You are not supposed to smoke in here. We are not supposed to feed the animals in the zoo. When are we supposed to submit this assignment? What am I supposed to do? 2. Intention or purpose What is a calculator supposed to do? It is supposed to help you do mathematical calculations quickly. What are ATMs supposed to do? They are supposed to let a bank's customers withdraw cash when they need it. A company's logo is supposed to help people easily identify its products. The government's new e-filing website was supposed to make income tax payment simpler for citizens. But many people say it has made the process more difficult! 3. Expectations What am I supposed to write in a cover letter? You're supposed to say what job you want to apply for, and what relevant skills you have. The match was supposed to start at 5 PM, but it has been delayed due to rain. Popular belief Harvard Business School is supposed to have the best MBA program in the world. This restaurant is supposed to serve fantastic sushi. I got robbed in broad daylight in Canada once. And it is supposed to be one of the safest countries in the world! Quiz: 1. You must pay the rent before the third day of the month. 2. Students are not allowed to bring any electronic devices into the exam room. 3. Radha and Anish were going to get married in August, but they've postponed the wedding to December. 4. Professor Sanchez was scheduled to speak at this conference, but she got ill. 5. I have agreed to pick up a friend of mine at the airport at 8 PM. 6. The job of the government is to protect all of its citizens, regardless of their religious beliefs. 7. The purpose of a graph is to display data visually to make it easier to understand. 8. Many people say that The Titanic is the greatest romantic movie of all time. Quiz answers: 1. You're supposed to pay the rent before the third day of the month. 2. Students are not supposed to bring any electronic devices into the exam room. 3. Radha and Anish were supposed to get married in August, but they've postponed the wedding to December. 4. Professor Sanchez was supposed to speak at this conference, but she got ill. 5. I'm supposed to pick up a friend of mine at the airport at 8 PM. 6. The government is supposed to protect all of its citizens, regardless of their religious beliefs. 7. A graph is supposed to display data visually to make it easier to understand. 8. The Titanic is supposed to be the greatest romantic movie of all time.
Views: 112505 Learn English Lab
Tell Me About Yourself - The PERFECT ANSWER to This Interview Question
 
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Learn how to give the PERFECT answer to the interview question - "Tell me about yourself". Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: “Tell me about yourself” – this is usually the first question you will hear in an interview. Giving a good answer means that you will create a strong, positive impression on the interviewer. In this video, I will give you a three-step formula to give the perfect answer to this question every time. So let’s talk about it. So you go into the interview room, shake hands with the interviewer (or interviewers, if there’s more than one person), and you sit down. And then comes the question – “Tell me about yourself.” How do you begin? Well, the best way to start your answer is with a 1-sentence introduction. This sentence should summarize who you are. For example, if I were applying for a teaching job, I would say “I am an English teacher and teacher trainer with 7 years' experience in the ESL industry.” ESL means English as a Second Language. Notice that this sentence tells you that I am an English teacher, I’m also a teacher trainer (meaning that I train other teachers), and that I have 7 years’ experience in the field. So it’s a good summary of me as the candidate for the job. Now, if you just graduated from college, and you’re applying for your first job, you can say: “I am a recent graduate with a BBA in Operations Management” for example. So, this is the introduction. After this, you should say three to five sentences about your achievements. These sentences should show why you are a good fit for this job. This part is where you impress the interviewer. If I were a candidate, I would talk about my successes as a teacher: I would say that I specialize in teaching business English to professionals. I’d mention the fact that I have trained executives from multinational corporations. I’d then say that the success of my training programs have made these clients repeat customers – meaning that they have come back to my company for more training. Finally I would mention that I do teacher training, helping English teachers to deliver better lessons in their classrooms. These are my strong points. When you prepare your answer, think of three to five points about your achievements. If you are a recent graduate, mention your accomplishments in college (like your projects), and your other academic successes. Now, at this point, the interviewer must be impressed with you. They will have gained a good deal of respect for your skills. But, they might be thinking – well, you’ve done all this and you sound like a real professional, but why do you want to come and work here – in this company? So, your closing statement should be your answer for why you want this job. And here, it’s never good to say “I hate my boss” or “all my coworkers are plotting against me” or something else that’s negative about your present job. Instead, if you’re changing jobs, you should make it sound positive. I might say “I’m very happy in my current job, but I’m looking for a more challenging role. One where I can use my skills in a managerial position. That’s why I want this job.” Or, if I were a recent graduate, I would say “I am looking for a job where I can put my education and skills to use, where I will be challenged to grow and learn, and contribute to the success of the company.” And with this closing statement, you end your answer. OK, now that you know the formula, let me show you my complete answer as an example. Imagine that I’m applying to be a senior English teacher at a language school. I go in for the interview, and the interviewer says “Tell me about yourself”. Here’s my answer: I am an English teacher and teacher trainer with 7 years' experience in the ESL industry. I specialize in teaching business English to professionals and have trained executives from a number of multinational corporations. My training programs for these companies have focused on making their executives better communicators, particularly in working with their overseas colleagues and customers. Thanks to the success of these programs, many corporate clients have become repeat customers for the company I work for. Aside from teaching business English, I have also delivered workshops for teachers, aiming to help them teach English with a more practical, communicative, skills-based approach. Needless to say, I’m very happy in my current job, it’s extremely fulfilling, but I’m looking for a more challenging managerial role where I can apply my teaching expertise, and that’s why I’m here today. So remember the formula – start with a strong introduction, then talk about 3-5 of your achievements, and finally, end with a statement on why you want this job.
Views: 1176890 Learn English Lab
15 Words You Might Be Pronouncing WRONG! - Commonly Mispronounced English Words
 
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Also check out - 50 Words You are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. 10 Brand Names You are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LoTF_B8vrU 2. 20 Most Difficult Words to Pronounce in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phfBDaJOoPg 3. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY 4. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus 5. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI 6. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 85923 Learn English Lab
50 Words You're Pronouncing WRONGLY Right Now! | Top 50 Mispronounced English Words, Common Mistakes
 
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Learn the TOP 50 MISPRONOUNCED English words. These words are common mistakes made by many English learners. I will show you how to avoid these incorrect pronunciations and say all of these words correctly in this pronunciation lesson. For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I will show you fifty words that you are probably pronouncing incorrectly right now. And I’ll also teach you how to say them correctly. Let’s start with this word – how do you say it? Well, we say /prə-’nauns/, /prə-’naunst/ and /prə-’nauns-iŋ/, but /prə-nən- si-’eɪ-shən/. There’s no ‘noun’ in this word. It’s ‘pronunciation.’ Word number two is ‘says’. This word is commonly mispronounced by people learning English as /s eɪs/. But remember: I say, you say, but he or she /sez/. Number three is ‘et cetera’. A very common incorrect pronunciation is to say ‘ek’ – ‘ek setra’ instead of ‘et’. Don’t say that. And also remember that the stress is on ‘ce’. So the word is /et-’se- tə-rə/. You will also hear /et-’se-trə/ – that is less common but it’s OK too. Next up is ‘often’. Some pronounce this as /’äf-tən/. Now, strictly speaking, /’äf- tən/ is not wrong, but the more common pronunciation is with the ‘t’ silent, so I recommend that you always say /’ä-fən/. One word that is often mispronounced by learners of English is ‘women’. This is, of course, because of the English language’s crazy spelling system. But remember that we say /’wu-mən/ for one woman and /’wi-min/ for the plural – /’wi-min/. Word number six is ‘police’. This isn’t /po-lees/ or /po- lis/. It’s /pə/ and /lees/ with the stress on /lees/. So /pə-’lees/. The next word is ‘vehicle’. It’s often pronounced wrongly as /ve-hi-kl/. But the ‘e’ is a long vowel and the ‘h’ is silent. So /’vee-ə-kl/. Number eight is this word. How would you say it? The correct pronunciation is /’zhän-rə/. Pay attention to the first sound, it’s like ‘sh’ but you put your voice into it - /’zhän-rə/. /’zhän-rə/ Next up is actually what you’re watching right now – ‘video’. The important thing is that both the ‘i’ and the ‘e’ are pronounced as short ‘i’ sounds. It’s not /vee-di-o/, it’s /’vi-di-o/. If you watch a video on YouTube or Facebook, you might leave a ‘comment’. I have heard many speakers say /’kə-ment/. Now whether you use this word as a noun or a verb, the first syllable is always /’kä /. So it’s never a /’kə-ment/, it’s a /’kä-ment/. Word number eleven is ‘interesting’. This is mispronounced sometimes as /’in-tə-rə-stiŋ/. But there are only three syllables – /in / – /trə / – /stiŋ/ and the stress is on ‘IN’. So the word is /’in-trə-stiŋ/. Number twelve is ‘hotel’. There are two syllables – /ho/ and / tel/ like the English word ‘tell’ as in ‘tell me’. The stress is on the second syllable, so /ho-’tel/. A related word is ‘suite’. This means a set of connected rooms in a hotel and this is wrongly pronounced by many people as /soot/. But it’s /sweet/ - like when you eat a piece of candy - /sweet/. While we’re on the topic of suites and hotels, I cannot leave out this word – ‘restaurant’. It gives a lot of English learners trouble. But, don’t let the fancy spelling confuse you – the second syllable is just /tə /. The third is /ränt/. So /’res-tə- ränt/. In British English, you might hear just two syllables – /’res-trɒnt/ - that is also correct. After you eat at a restaurant, you have to pay the bill. But you might get a discount on your bill if you have one of these – a ‘coupon’. A common incorrect pronunciation is /’koo-pən/. But the second syllable should be /pän/. So – /’koo-pän/. Here’s word number sixteen – how would you say it? The proper pronunciation is not ‘break’ ‘fast’ – it’s ‘breakfast’. /brek / with a short /e/ sound and /fəst/ with an /ə/ sound - so /’brek-fəst/. You know what I had for breakfast today? I had this – ‘pizza’. Really, I did. It’s not a /pee-sə/ and it’s not a /peed-zə/. There’s no /z/ sound in this word. It’s /peet/, /sə/ - /’peet-sə/. Another food word that’s mispronounced a lot is ‘vegetable’. It’s not /ve-jə- tə-bl/. If you say it correctly, there are only three syllables - /vej/, / tə/, /bl/ - /’vej- tə-bl/. Let’s talk about a couple of vegetables now – this is a ‘cucumber’. It’s not a /ku- koom-bər/. Think of it like saying the letter ‘Q’ and then /kəm-bər/ like ‘number’. So /’kyoo-kəm-bər/. This vegetable is called ‘lettuce’. I know the spelling looks like /let-yoos/ but it’s not – it’s /letis/. And since we talking about food, here’s a food that just about everybody loves – ‘chocolate’. When you ask for this at the store, make sure there are only two syllables – /chäk / and /lət/ - /’chäk-lət/. And remember: there is no ‘late’ in ‘chocolate’. Speaking of chocolate, how would you say this word? This is ‘dessert’.
Views: 4144081 Learn English Lab
HAVE HAD / HAS HAD / HAD HAD - Are these correct? - English Grammar Made Easy
 
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What is the difference between HAVE HAD, HAS HAS, and HAD HAD? Watch this video and find out. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hey there and welcome back. I'm Ganesh from LearnEnglishLab.com and in today's lesson we're going to talk about have had, has had, and had had. Now many students have come to me and said - I saw had had in a sentence. Is that grammatically correct or is that an error - is that a typo? meaning a printing error. And let me tell you all three of these forms are grammatically correct and you should learn how to use them correctly. Alright, over here I have three sentences that are going to help us understand these forms take a look at the first sentence - I have had lunch what a strange sounding sentence right - I have had lunch. well let me tell you a little secret when you see two 'have's in a sentence this is have, this is also have, it's just in the past participle form - its had but it's basically just have. So when you see two 'have's in a sentence then the first have and the second have have different meanings this first have is called a helping verb I've written helping verb over there and this had is called the main verb it's called the main verb because it has the main meaning in the sentence - this have only shows the tense of the sentence so when you see have or had used as the main verb that means that it is being used as a shortcut for some other word but in this case what could that other word be? What could be the meaning of had? Well take a look at this list over on the side. When we use have as the main verb in a sentence it could mean a number of different things - it could mean to eat like when we talk about having breakfast or having dinner or it could mean to have a drink which means just to drink something or we could be talking about owning something like when I say I have a car I mean that I own a car or it could show some relationship between people I have a sister - that means or that shows a brother-sister relationship or it could talk about some kind of experience like if I said I had difficulty or I had trouble finding the place that means it was difficult for me to find the place Now these are just some example meanings of have. The word have has many meanings in English so if you want to see all of those meetings go and look at your dictionary and find the word have and you'll see a lot of meanings but these are some of the more common meanings OK let's now look at our sentence - I have had lunch so what could this had mean in this sentence? well in this sentence it means eaten because here you see there's the word lunch so this sentence just means "I have eaten lunch." we are using had as the shortcut for eaten OK but what about this have? Well as I told you before that have shows the tense of the sentence. To understand that read the sentence without the have I had lunch. I had lunch means I ate lunch. When did I have lunch? maybe I had lunch yesterday or the day before - any time in the past and that has no connection to the present. But when we use this have it shows that my eating lunch has some connection to the present. For example if a friend comes to me and asks "Hey do you want to have lunch with me?" and I don't want to have lunch because my lunch is already finished i would say "Oh I have had lunch" Thank you very much. So this have shows that I just ate lunch so it shows some connection to the present So you see this have shows the tense and this had means eaten so they're completely different functions or purposes Alright with this knowledge let's now look at the second sentence - He has had four jobs in two years once again we're going to separate the two 'have's this is the helping verb and this is the main verb. And the meaning of the main verb here is worked so "He has worked four jobs in two years" is what it means So once again had is being used as a shortcut for worked What about this has? Well this is just the same as this have over here but we are saying has because the subject is he if the subject is he, she, or it we say has. If the subject is I, you, we or they we use have. So if the subject here were I, this would be have I have had four jobs in two years but since it's he, it's has and once again the tense here is the present perfect tense and this 'has' shows some connection to the present
Views: 338961 Learn English Lab
Improve Your ACCENT with MOVIES Using This Technique - The 3C Method - English Pronunciation Lesson
 
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Learn any native speaker accent (American, British etc.) using this simple movie technique. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** ALL PRONUNCIATION LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f HOW TO BECOME FLUENT IN ENGLISH: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix 1 SIMPLE METHOD TO BUILD A POWERFUL VOCABULARY: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJkNIU_dVaA&list=PLmwr9polMHwtPulG3q4SrSNIZzlJl2gXf SIMPLE TRICKS TO IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwtPulG3q4SrSNIZzlJl2gXf Transcript: You know, people often ask me if there’s an easy method to improve their pronunciation, and learn a native speaker accent – American, British, Australian etc. Well, the answer is yes – there is an easy technique, and I’m going to teach you that technique in this lesson. This is an exercise I have taught to many of my students, and it is what I used personally to improve my own pronunciation. So let’s jump into it. Alright, so what is this simple method? Well, I call it the 3C technique. It’s called 3C because there are three steps – Copy, compare and correct. Now, before we talk about how to do these steps, there are a few things you will need for the exercise. You will need: An English-language movie or TV show to practice with (it should have subtitles). You’ll need to watch on a computer, DVD player or a phone (so that you can rewind). And you will need a voice recorder to record your own voice – this can be just your cell phone. Before doing the exercise, you should sit down and watch the movie or TV show fully one time. This is to understand the story – don’t worry about learning English. Just enjoy it on your first watch. After you have seen the movie or show once, it’s time to start the first stage of the exercise – Copy. That is, you’re going to copy the pronunciation of the actors in the movie – one sentence at a time. When you hear a sentence, listen to it and then stop the video. Look at the subtitles and say the sentence that you just heard. You should try to imitate the actor’s pronunciation exactly. Then rewind the video – that is, go back a few seconds – and listen to the sentence again, and then stop the video and practice once again. You should do this a few times with the same sentence. Listen, stop the video, and practice. Listen, stop, practice. This is how you copy the pronunciation of native speakers. Do this three or four times and then move on to the second step – compare. That is, you’re going to compare your pronunciation with the actor’s pronunciation. So, take your voice recorder (or your cell phone), and record yourself saying that same, first sentence. Now, play the movie and listen to the actor saying it, then play the recording and listen to yourself - are you saying all the words correctly? Is your rhythm the same as the actor’s? Is your tone right? This is the process of comparing. And now, you correct. Based on your listening and your own recording, make changes to the way you say the sentence so that your pronunciation matches the pronunciation of the actor. Keep practicing that same sentence until you get it right. While you do this, if you want to go back and listen to the movie, that’s fine – you can also record yourself multiple times to check your pronunciation. Finally, when you are happy that you are saying the sentence correctly, record yourself one final time and keep the recording for future reference. After you have completed the three stages, you move on to the second sentence and repeat the steps - listen to the sentence, copy the actor’s pronunciation, practice it a couple of times, record yourself, compare it with what you hear in the movie, correct yourself, and then go to the third sentence, and so on. Now, you might be thinking – this is going to take a long time. Well, it could but you don’t have to do this for every single sentence in the movie or show. If a sentence is too easy or it’s too long and difficult, or if it’s not very interesting, skip it and go on to the next one. Pick sentences that you like, but make sure you practice these sentences thoroughly, until you can say them exactly like the native speaker you are imitating. It can also be a good idea to write down the sentences in a notebook so that you can practice them by yourself later. As I said in the beginning of the video, this is the same technique I used to improve my own English. If you stick with it, if you do it regularly, I guarantee that you will improve your pronunciation, and be able to learn any accent you want.
Views: 47910 Learn English Lab
SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE - English Grammar - How to Use Should've, Could've and Would've
 
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Can you use should have, could have and would have correctly? Watch this video and learn the correct use of these three past modals. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome back. I'm Ganesh from LearnEnglishLab.com and today we're going to talk about how to use should've, could've and would've correctly. All three of these words are basically "should have," "could have" and "would have" so all of them have the verb "have" here but I've written like this because when we speak we usually shorten that to should've, could've and would've. Just that remember they have "have" in them. These are all used to express regret about past decisions or actions. What does regret mean? Regret means that we're unhappy about a decision or action in the past and that is the function of these words, and all three of these are grammar words. To understand these better, I have a decision or action over on this side and I have a result over on the side - this is a situation that we're going to use to understand these words. Have a look at the decision or action - "I didn't study enough" and the result was "I failed my exam" - now a student might say this. I've heard a lot of students say this. His teacher might tell him - "You should've studied more." What does she mean by that? Well she's trying to say that she's not happy about his decision His decision was that he didn't study enough. By saying this, his teacher is saying the opposite of what happened. So what happened? He didn't study. She's saying You should've studied more. So what this does is it shows that you're unhappy about the decision. This can be "you" or this can be "I". He might say, the student might say, "I should've studied more." Or two people talking about him - maybe his teacher and another teacher talking about him - his teacher might say, "Shane should've studied more." He didn't study and he failed. Alright, so this can be any subject. Could've is just like should've but could've is a little softer. Have a look at this example. He could've studied more but he didn't. Maybe this is his teacher saying this to another teacher. And here, could've focuses on the possibility. That's very important - this sentence says that it was possible for him to study - he had the time he had the materials, he had the books, he had everything. It was possible but he didn't do it. And often could've is followed by this - "but he didn't." But it can be used in another way. You can also use could've directly to someone if you want to say that you're not happy about their decision. So you can say "You could've studied more." What that does is that's a little softer than should've. Compare the two - if I tell you "You should've studied more" Then it's a little strong. If I'm your teacher or parent that's OK but if I'm your friend, you might be a little offended. It might be a little rude, so in that case you can use could've. You can say "You could've studied more." See, it's a little softer. So if you're saying it to someone's face, you can leave out the "but" - no "but" You could have studied more. But if you're talking about someone else This is very common - "He could have studied more but he didn't." Alright? Would've is a little interesting because it's just like should've and could've because it's used to express regret, but there's one big difference and the difference is - if you look at both should've and could've, they refer only to the decision or the action - they're not talking about the result. But would've talks both about the decision or the action, and the result. So if you want to talk about both of those, you use would've. Have a look at the sentence "If Shane had studied more, he would've passed the exam. You can see that the decision or the action is over here - If "Shane had studied more," The reality is he didn't study - so this is the opposite of this, and then he would have passed the exam. This is the opposite of this over here. He failed the exam but "If Shane had studied more, he would've passed the exam." Notice this "had" over here That's very important, because that's what really shows that we're talking about the past. So don't leave that out, OK? Remember that.
Views: 395079 Learn English Lab
How to Understand Fast-Talking Native English Speakers | English Listening Skills
 
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In this lesson, you will learn the 4 reasons why you don't understand native speakers of English. Also check out: 5 THINGS TO PRACTICE EVERY DAY TO IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-F8b5t-91rc ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY 2. 50 Words You are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w 3. 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI 4. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 86867 Learn English Lab
10 Brand Names You are Pronouncing WRONG! - Nike, Amazon, McDonald's, Mercedes-Benz, Disney, etc.
 
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Do you pronounce these 10 BRAND NAMES correctly? Watch this lesson and find out! Also see 50 ENGLISH WORDS YOU ARE PRONOUNCING WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 1157289 Learn English Lab
11 Short English Conversation PHRASES - Speak Fluent English - Common Expressions in English
 
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Speak fluent English with these 11 common English expressions. Download the full lesson notes (PDF) here: https://goo.gl/1CQUzF ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. 1 Simple Trick to Become FLUENT in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0qT4cK-wtk&list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix 2. 10 Brand Names You are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LoTF_B8vrU&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f 3. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. 50 Words You are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 417550 Learn English Lab
4 Body Language Tricks to Impress Anyone - Improve Communication Skills - Personality Development
 
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Learn 4 body language tricks to impress anyone in a conversation. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. 5 Things to Practice Every Day to Improve Your English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-F8b5t-91rc&list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix 2. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. 50 Words You Are Pronouncing WRONG: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdtUjWb0O9w&list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f 4. 1 Simple Trick to Become FLUENT in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0qT4cK-wtk&list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix 5. All PRONUNCIATION lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwtOrZVwGuiN8xLup5elPE6f
Views: 147251 Learn English Lab
GET - 7 Most Common Uses of the Verb GET - Learn How to Use GET Correctly - English Vocabulary
 
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Learn the TOP 7 USES of the verb GET. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven most common uses of the verb ‘get’. So let’s start. Before we get into the lesson, as always, if you have any questions, just let me know in the comments section below, and I will talk to you there. Also, there is a quiz at the end of hits lesson to test your understanding. Now, the most common meaning of ‘get’ is to mean receive, obtain, or buy something. For example, “I got some old books from my grandfather.” It means “I received some old books”. In the next example, “We’ve gotten 50 emails in the past three days.” It means “We have received 50 emails.” Notice that the first sentence is in the past simple tense and the second sentence is in the present perfect tense. So in sentence number two, we are using the third form of ‘get’ – the past participle form. The verb ‘get ’ is irregular – that is, we don’t say ‘getted’ to make the past simple or past participle forms. The correct forms are ‘get’, ‘got’, and ‘gotten’. In American English, ‘gotten’ is more common, and in British English, ‘got’ is the preferred past participle form. So in number two, you could say “We’ve got 50 emails”. That would be the British English form. Here are two more examples: “Harry just got a job at the airport.” It means he obtained a job, or that he was hired for a job at the airport. And finally, “What are you getting me for my birthday?” It means “What present are you going to buy for me for my birthday?” OK, let’s move on to the second use. In British English, the expression ‘have got’ is used a lot to mean ‘have’. It’s used in American English as well but it’s more common in British English. This expression is used in two ways – the first is to talk about ownership or relationship. For example, “I’ve got two sisters.”, “Sara has got Wi-Fi at home.”, “Have you got time for a coffee?” The second function is to express obligation or necessity (that is, by using ‘have got to’ in the place of ‘have to’). Like in these examples: “You’ve got to get up early tomorrow.” or “He has got to learn German to live in Austria.” In all of these sentences, you can use ‘have’ or ‘has’ instead of ‘have got’ or ‘has got’ and the meaning would be the same. But there is an important point here. When we use ‘have got’ in these two ways, it does not have a past tense. To change these sentences to the past, just use ‘had’. For example, say “Sara had Wi-Fi at home.” which means she doesn’t have it now. Or “He had to learn German to live in Austria.” Don’t use ‘had got’ to mean ‘had’ – it’s wrong. Remember that. Alright, the third use of ‘get’ is to make offers and requests. Take this question for example: “Could you get me the menu, please?” You might say this at a restaurant. Here, ‘get’ means ‘bring’. It’s like asking “Could you bring me the menu?” Instead of ‘the menu’, you can say ‘get me a cup of coffee’, ‘get me a sandwich’, anything. The next example, “Can I get you something to drink?” is an offer. Here, I’m offering to bring you something to drink. It’s very common to say this to a guest, so the next time you have a friend over at your place, ask your friend, “Hey, can I get you something to drink? Or something to eat, maybe?” OK, let’s move on to the next use. The verb ‘get ’ is often used when we want to talk about traveling to mean to arrive or to reach a place. For example, “I got home late yesterday evening because of the traffic.” That means I reached home late. A common question that is asked on the phone is “What time will you get here?” That means, what time are you going to reach this place?
Views: 119380 Learn English Lab
PHRASE vs. CLAUSE - What's the Difference? - English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clauses
 
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What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? Watch this video and find out. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 In this lesson, you will also learn about the different types of phrases and clauses with examples. Topics include dependent and independent clauses, noun phrases, verb phrases, adverb phrases etc. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the difference between phrases and clauses. Are these different grammar items or are they just two names for the same thing? That's what we're going to talk about in this video. Now before we start just remember: if you have any questions at all you just have to ask me in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. So in this lesson we're going to learn the difference between phrases and clauses. But first let's talk about how phrases and clauses are similar. They're similar in this way: both of these refer two groups of words that are meaningful. Look at these examples: near my home or Dexter won the bicycle race You can see that these are meaningful so one of them is afraid and the other is a clause OK so what's the difference between them? Well the difference is this: a clause is a group of words with a subject-verb combination so Dexter won the bicycle race is a clause because it has a subject - Dexter and a verb - won is the past tense of win so this is a clause. A phrase is a group of words without a subject-verb combination. So near my home is a phrase because there's no subject verb combination It's very simple but keep this important difference in mind - a clause has a subject-verb combination and a phrase does not. So now let me show you some more examples so that you can learn how to easily identify phrases and clauses Alright all the words that you see on the screen are phrases. You'll notice that in all of these there's no subject verb combination and these examples also show the most common types of phrases For example my two wonderful dogs is a phrase focusing on the noun dogs and the phrase the tallest building in the world focuses on the noun building so we say that these are noun phrases. What about couldn't go and will be working? Can you guess what type of phrases these are? These are verb phrases because they only have verbs in them. All of these words are verbs similarly we have the adjective phrases very friendly and afraid of the dark we say that these are adjective phrases because the focus is on friendly and afraid - the other words in these phrases are only helping the main words and the main words are adjectives. Really fast and much quicker are adverb phrases because the adverbs fast and quicker are the focus of these phrases and finally what about near the post office and on the 29th? Do you know? These are preposition phrases because each of these tells us about a place or about time using the prepositions near and on. These are the most common types of phrases that you will come across and once again remember these are phrases because they don't have a subject verb combination. So let's now look at some examples of clauses like I said a clause is just like a phrase - it's a group of words but a clause has a subject verb combination now in English there are many different kinds of causes but the two most important that you need to know about are independent and dependent clauses let's start with the independent clause this is simply a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. For example He ate dinner this is a clause because it has a subject - he - and a verb - ate - past tense of eat and it's independent because it can be a sentence on its own. So what's a dependent clause then? Well it's a clause that is it has a subject-verb combination but it cannot be a sentence by itself. For example When James got home is a dependent clause - it has a subject - James - and a verb - got - but if you think about it it's not a complete sentence because if I said when James got home you will ask okay then what? What happened? So you see the sentence isn't complete so this is a dependent clause.
Views: 297962 Learn English Lab
What Does AIN'T Mean? - Is it Correct English? - With Example Sentences & Quiz
 
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Learn the different meanings of the word AIN'T and how to use it correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix Transcript: The word ‘ain’t’. You may have heard native speakers say it in real life, or in movies or songs. What does it mean? And should you use it in your own speech and writing? That’s what I’m going to teach you in this lesson. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to check your understanding. So let’s start. Alright, ‘ain’t’ is most commonly used in the place of three forms – am not, is not, and are not. Here’s an example: “You gotta believe me. I ain’t lyin’!” What does that mean? Well, it means the same thing as “You have got to believe me. I am not lying.” Here, ‘ain’t’ means ‘am not’. I want you to notice two other things in the first sentence: it has ‘gotta’ which is a contraction of ‘got to’, and the ‘have’ is missing – it just says ‘you gotta’. The other thing is ‘lyin’ in which the ‘g’ is dropped. These are features of informal, colloquial, spoken language. But the second sentence with the same meaning is more correct and acceptable in formal or semi-formal situations. So here’s an important thing you should know: ‘ain’t’ is a very informal word. So you should never use it in any formal or semi-formal situation, especially in writing. OK, here’s another example: That guy in the blue shirt – ain’t he the new manager? So what is the meaning of ‘ain’t’ here? The meaning is ‘isn’t’ – it’s like saying “Isn’t he the new manager?” Notice how this sentence has two parts – “That guy in the blue shirt” and “ain’t he the new manager?” – that’s OK in informal speech but the sentence is not well-connected. To make it more grammatical, we can say “Isn’t that man in the blue shirt the new manager?” – it’s more complex but it’s also more formal. Alright, what about this example: A mother says to her child: “You ain’t gettin’ no dessert until you eat your vegetables.” Can you understand the meaning? It means “You aren’t not getting any dessert until you eat your vegetables.” - dessert means cake or ice cream or something like that. So here, ‘ain’t’ means ‘aren’t’. Notice that the sentence says, ‘aint’ gettin’ no dessert’ – ‘ain’t’ is already a negative, and then you have another ‘no’ – this is called a double negative and it’s grammatically incorrect. But, again, in very informal speech, you will hear that sometimes. Now, we’ve talked about using ‘ain’t’ in the place of ‘am not’, ‘is not’ and ‘are not’. In some situations, you will also see the word used in the place of ‘have not’ and ‘has not’. For example: “We’re goin’ to New York to visit some relatives ‘cuz we ain’t been there in ages.” It means “because we haven’t been there in ages.” (‘in ages’ means ‘for a long time’). Here’s another one: “I loaned Jim $100 two months ago and he ain’t paid me back yet!” What does ‘ain’t’ mean here? It means ‘hasn’t’: “I lent Jim $100 two months ago, but he hasn’t paid me back yet!” – ‘lent’ is considered a little more formal than ‘loaned’ and the conjunction ‘but’ fits better in this sentence when we’re talking a little more formally. So here are all the sentences we’ve looked at. Can you see why ‘ain’t’ is considered bad English? It’s because one word is used in the place of so many other words. So the listener gets the impression that your vocabulary is limited and that’s why you’re using ‘ain’t’ instead of the more accurate words ‘am not’, ‘isn’t, ‘aren’t’, ‘haven’t’ or ‘hasn’t’. In fact, many people in academic and professional circles consider ‘ain’t’ to be a word only used by less educated people. So my suggestion is that you avoid ain’t. I don’t use it personally. Now, if you need to say it as part of a joke or in a line from a movie, then it’s OK. But in other situations, it’s best to just not use this word.
Views: 42168 Learn English Lab
LEND, BORROW, OWE - What's the Difference? - Learn English Vocabulary
 
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Do you know the difference between LEND, BORROW, and OWE? Watch this video and find out if you can use these vocabulary words correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 37013 Learn English Lab
MAY, MIGHT - Basic English Grammar
 
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Watch this video and learn how to use may and might correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 118902 Learn English Lab
WILL vs. SHALL - What's the Difference? - Basic English Grammar
 
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Do you know the difference between WILL and SHALL? Watch this video and learn how to use these two basic verbs correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ PHRASE vs. CLAUSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z45UdL0WTro&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘shall’ are two of the most challenging words in English, even for native speakers. But in this lesson, I will show you how to use these two words correctly, and avoid making common mistakes with them. So let’s begin. Welcome back. Before we start, as always, if you have any questions at all, just ask me in the comments section below, and I will talk to you there. Now, in this lesson, I will teach you the two important rules for using ‘will’ and ‘shall’ correctly, and we will discuss how to use them in questions to make requests, offers, and suggestions. There is a final quiz at the end to test your understanding. OK, so how do you use ‘will’ and ‘shall’ correctly? Well, here’s the short answer. In modern English, ‘shall’ has become uncommon. That means, most people just don’t use ‘shall’. In fact, in American English, ‘shall’ is very rarely used – it’s mainly found in some types of questions, but we shall discuss them later in this lesson. So for now, if you are not sure about the rules, just use ‘will’. It’s perfectly OK to use ‘will’ in all statements – no problem. But I’m sure you are watching this video because you want to know the proper grammatical rules for ‘will’ and ‘shall’, so let’s talk about those now. There are two sets of rules for using ‘will’ and ‘shall’. I call these the ‘normal future’ and the ‘strong future’. Let’s talk about the normal future first. This is when we express a plan, an expectation, or a prediction. The grammar rule says that if the subject of the sentence is ‘I’ or ‘We’, then ‘shall’ should be used. Here are some examples: “I shall wait for you at the train station.” and “We shall not go to the museum if we don’t have time.” You see here that we’re using ‘shall’ because the subjects are ‘I’ and ‘We’. In English, ‘I’ and ‘We’ are known as the first person. If the subject is the second person – ‘You’ or the third person – ‘He’, ‘She’, ‘It’, ‘They’ etc. then ‘will’ should be used. Here are some examples: “You will find the flash drive in the locker.”, “The match will not take place on October 7th.” Instead of ‘The match’, you can also say ‘It will not take place’. And finally, “All employees will receive fire safety training every two years.” Here, you can say ‘They’ instead of ‘All employees.’ Now these sentences on the screen are called the normal future or plain future because they’re normal sentences, and there’s no emotion attached to them. But sometimes, we want to express a strong emotion about the future – it could be a promise, a command, determination or duty. We call this the strong future. The grammar rule is that for the strong future, we reverse ‘will’ and ‘shall’. So now, we’re going to use ‘will’ with the first person: ‘I’ and ‘We’, and ‘shall’ with the second and third person. Take this sentence for example: “I will get an A on this exam. I promise!” Compare this to the previous sentence: “I shall wait for you at the train station.” There’s no emotion there – it’s just a simple future arrangement. But when I say “I will get an A on this exam” you can tell that I’m showing strong determination. So this is the strong future and we use ‘will’. Here’s another example: “We will not tolerate smoking inside the building!” You see that this is a warning, and it’s a strong warning, so we use ‘will’. These are first-person subjects. With second- and third-person subjects we use ‘shall’. For example, “You shall finish your homework before you go out to play.” What type of sentence is this? It’s a command or order. You can imagine a mother saying this to her child. The next example is “The wedding shall not take place!” Compare this to the previous sentence: “The match will not take place on October 7th.”
Views: 190065 Learn English Lab
AT, IN, ON - Prepositions of Place - Basic English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use At, IN and ON correctly to talk about place, position and location. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 210427 Learn English Lab
1 Simple Method to Improve Your Spelling - How to Write Correctly & Avoid Spelling Mistakes
 
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Learn how to write correctly without spelling mistakes using this simple method. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Do you make lots of spelling mistakes? Do you have difficulty remembering the correct spellings of words? Well, in this lesson, I’m going to teach you an easy, three-step method to improve your spelling and write correctly without making mistakes. So let’s talk about that. OK, the first step of this exercise is to find your spelling mistakes. You do this by checking your own writing. If you are a student, then I’m sure you write a lot. If you work, you might write emails or reports. So, at least once per week, take your writing, and try to find spelling mistakes that you have made. Now, I know that this can be difficult – you don’t know what mistakes you’re making. So there are two great ways to know your mistakes – the first is to ask someone else to read your work and underline or circle any errors (and also give you the correct spellings). The second option is to take your writing and type it (or copy/paste it) into Microsoft Word. The software will then underline your spelling mistakes for you and give you the corrections. This way, you can identify your own errors. OK, let’s do an exercise to understand this process: Here’s a short text that I wrote – there are five spelling errors in it. Stop the video, try to find the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers: ‘a lot’ should be spelled with a space. ‘Definitely’ has no ‘a’ – it should be an ‘i’. ‘Received’ is written with ‘ei’ not ‘ie’. ‘Rhythm’ needs to have an ‘h’ after ‘r’. And ‘schedule’ needs to start with ‘sch’. OK, did you find them all? Alright, so like this, you identify the words that you are spelling incorrectly and learn their correct spellings. And now comes the important part – record the correct spellings of these words. That means, you should note down the correct spellings of all the words you spelled wrongly in a notebook or in a file on your computer. You should write the spellings on one side of the page, and on the other, you should write the phonetic transcription – that is, the same word in pronunciation symbols – this will allow you to see the difference between the spelling and the pronunciation, and you will also be able to test yourself later. Now, I know that you don’t know all of these symbols, that’s OK – they’re very easy, you can find them by looking up each word in a dictionary. So just like I have done here, you should take all of the words – note down the correct spellings, and also note down the phonetic transcription. Finally, the last step is review the spellings regularly. You do this so that you don’t forget the correct spellings. Make one day of the week your spelling improvement day (maybe Saturday or Sunday). On this day, test yourself on the spellings. To do this, open your notebook and hide the spellings. Only look at the pronunciation symbols. Now, can you give me the correct spellings of these words that we just learned? Stop the video, try to write down the correct spellings, then play the video again and check. OK, here they are. Did you get them all right? So, you should do this for your own spellings that you write down. By testing yourself, you will remember the correct spellings and you will not make the same mistakes again. You should do these three steps regularly – find your mistakes, record the correct spellings, and test yourself regularly. As you do this, you will start to collect more and more words. This means that your mistakes will reduce, and eventually, you will be able to write without making spelling errors. Alright, if you liked this lesson, give it a thumbs up by hitting the like button. If you’re new to my channel, make sure to subscribe by clicking the subscribe button to get my latest lessons right here on YouTube. Happy learning and I will see you in another lesson soon.
Views: 349277 Learn English Lab
5 Tips to Become a FLUENT and CONFIDENT English Speaker - How to Speak English Fluently, Confidently
 
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Learn how to become a FLUENT English speaker. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi there, do you want to speak English fluently and confidently? Do you often hesitate when you speak, searching for the right words? Do you get nervous when you talk to native English speakers and struggle to express your thoughts naturally? Well, if your answer is yes to any of these questions, then you’re watching the right video because in this lesson, I will give you five tips to become a fluent and confident English speaker. The problems that I just showed you are faced by English learners everywhere. And if you follow the tips that I give you in this video, you will be able to overcome all of these problems, and speak English fluently without hesitation. Tip number one is relax and speak slower. Many people think that fluency means speaking fast. But that’s not true. Real fluency is speaking without hesitation – it has nothing to do with just speed. When you try to speak fast, you create two problems for yourself: the first is that you make it difficult to speak by forcing yourself to find words faster and faster, so that makes your brain go in ten different directions. That can make you hesitate and use lots of fillers like ‘uh’, ‘um’ etc. The second problem is that all of this will make you nervous and overexcited, making you hesitate even more. Instead, whenever you are in an English-speaking situation, the first thing you should do is relax: take a full, deep breath, drop your shoulders and relax your face – by doing this, you will remove stress and tension from your body and mind. After you do this, when you speak, I want you to speak slowly (not very slowly) but at a natural pace. This way, you will have more time to find the right words, and you’ll speak with less hesitation. Also, your relaxed voice will make the other person in the conversation to relax. By seeing that you are not nervous or stressed, they will get a positive impression of your speaking ability. So remember the three steps: take a deep breath, relax your shoulders and your face, and speak slowly. Tip number two is speak English every day. If you’re serious about improving your fluency, then you need to make English speaking a daily habit. A fantastic way of doing this is to make sentences in your head regularly. For example, if you’re sitting on the bus, you can describe what you see and how you feel about it. You can say, “OK I have the window seat. I love having the window seat because I can look outside. I see the park now. I remember that as a kid, my dad used to take me to this park and I used to love playing on the see-saw”. You can do this in any situation (not just on the bus) and it really helps to improve your ability to make sentences spontaneously in English. If you’re at home, I also recommend that you have conversations with yourself out loud. Pretty soon, this will become a habit and you will start to really enjoy the process, and the real benefit of this is that it will train your brain to think directly in English without translating from your native language. You can also watch my lesson called one simple trick to become fluent in English where I show you a great technique that you can use to improve your fluency by yourself. Now, even though you can practice by yourself, the best way to improve your fluency is to find a conversation partner so that you can practice speaking in real-life situations. You should get together with people like yourself who are learning English – this could be your classmates, your coworkers, your friends or even your family members - and start a speaking club. Try to meet at least one or two times a week (if you can do this every day, then that’s great!) and just speak English. You can practice speaking freely or you can bring discussion topics and have conversations on these topics. Tip number three is to learn fixed phrases and expressions. If you pay attention to the English of native speakers, you will notice that a lot of the time, they use the same fixed phrases and expressions. These could be basic greetings like “How are you?”, “How’s it going?”, “How are things?” “Good thanks. How are things with you?”, “What about you?” etc. It could be phrases for making requests – “Could you help me with this?”, “Can you lend me a hand?” or making offers – “Would you like a cup of coffee?”, “Do you want me to open the window?” or phrases for giving a compliment (that is for praising someone) like “You’re a fantastic singer.” or “You look amazing in that dress.”
Views: 260349 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of DO / DOES / DID - Basic English Grammar - with Examples, Exercises & Quiz
 
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Learn how to use DO, DOES and DID correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwvGTssgSU9KWEm2T4WiWaTj Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I am going to show you how to use ‘do’, ‘does’, and ‘did’ correctly. I’ll first teach you the basics and then I’ll give you some usage tips that will help you to avoid mistakes with these forms. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video. So let’s begin. Before we talk about the uses of ‘do’, ‘does’ and ‘did’, you need to know the basic grammar rule with these forms. The rule is: in the present, if the subject is I / You / We / They or any plural noun, then we use ‘do’. If the subject is He / She / It or any singular noun, then we use ‘does’. This is when we talk about the present. If we’re talking only about the past, then it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘did’. Alright, let’s do a quick test: in the present, what do we use with I / You / We / They or a plural? We use ‘do’. And with He / She / It or a singular noun? We use ‘does’. What about in the past? For any subject, we use ‘did’. OK, let’s now talk about the first use of these three forms. This is in making negative sentences. To understand this, let’s first take a positive sentence: “I like ice cream.” What is the verb here? It’s ‘like’ – this is called the main verb because it has the main meaning in the sentence. So let’s make this negative. In English, the rule for making negative sentences is that we add ‘not’ to the helping verb in the sentence. But wait – there’s only one verb here – ‘like’ which is the main verb. There is no other helping verb. So what do we do now? Well, we add the verb ‘do’ as a helping verb in the sentence. Then, we put ‘not’ next to it. “I do not like ice cream.” is the negative sentence. In speech, we usually shorten this to ‘don’t’ – “I don’t like ice cream.” OK, what about this? “He plays hockey.” Remember that for He / She / It in the present, we use ‘does’. Since we already have an –s in ‘does’, we remove it from the main verb – we don’t say ‘plays’, we say ‘play’ – “He does not play hockey” or “He doesn’t play hockey.” So the structure of a negative sentence in the present simple tense is subject + ‘do not’ or ‘does not’ + the main verb in its base form (remember: don’t add ‘s’ to the main verb) and then the rest of the sentence. OK, let’s do an exercise now. Here are a few more sentences. I want you to make them all negative. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers: “You don’t sing very well.”, “We don’t travel to South Korea every year.”, “They don’t live in a big house.”, “She doesn’t want a new washing machine.”, “That piano doesn’t look old.” Good. Now, these sentences are all in the present tense. Let’s quickly talk about what happens when we have past tense sentences. Do you remember the rule for the past tense? That’s right, we use ‘did’ for all subjects. So we just say ‘did not’ or ‘didn’t’ plus the main verb in its base form. So here are the past tense negative sentences – I’ve made some slight changes to make them sound natural. If you want, stop the video and read them to make sure you understand. So this is the first use of ‘do’, ‘does’ and ‘did’ – making negative sentences. Let’s now move on to the second use and this is in making questions. Here’s an example: “I look good in this shirt.” Let’s make this a question. Once again, the rule is that we need an auxiliary (or helping) verb for this. Since the sentence doesn’t have a helping verb, we’re going to use ‘do’. In questions, we put the helping verb right at the beginning of the sentence. So, the structure for present simple tense questions is Do or Does + the subject + the main verb in its base form and then the rest of the sentence. So “Do I look good in this shirt?” is the correct form. In this sentence, the main verb is ‘look’. Just a quick tip: when you write, don’t forget to add the question mark at the end of a question.
Views: 378409 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of THERE, THEIR, THEY'RE | What's the Difference? | Commonly Confused Words
 
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Learn how to use THERE, THEIR & THEY'RE correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: There, their, they’re – it sounds like I just said one word three times but those are actually three different words. In this lesson, I will show you how to use these confusing words correctly. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Now before we talk about the use of these words, a quick note on pronunciation: all three of these are pronounced /ðer/ - the pronunciation is the same, keep that in mind. OK, so let’s talk about the first word – ‘t’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘r’ ‘e’. This word is an adverb which means ‘that place’. Take this sentence – “The restaurant is over there.” It means the restaurant is in that place. So this is the opposite of ‘here’ which means ‘in this place’. In fact, you can easily remember this spelling – ‘t’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘r’ ‘e’ – if you notice that it has ‘here’ inside of it. Now, the word ‘there’ has another common use. This is to introduce the subject of a sentence. For example, “There are four apples in the bag.” You see that the subject of the sentence is really ‘apples’ and ‘there’ is just used as a dummy subject to introduce ‘apples’. These are the two uses of there with ‘t’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘r’ ‘e’. Let’s move on to the second word – ‘their’ spelled ‘t’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘i’ ‘r’. This word is the possessive form of ‘they’. What does possessive mean? Well, it means that the word shows ownership or relationship. Here’s a chart showing these forms. The possessive form of ‘I’ is ‘my’. For ‘you’ it’s ‘your’, ‘we’ – ‘our’, ‘he’ – ‘his’, ‘she’ – ‘her’, ‘it’ – ‘its’ and for ‘they’ it’s ‘their’. Here’s an example: “The children took their toys outside to play.” In this sentence, ‘their’ shows ownership – the toys belong to the children. And in the next sentence: “Teachers should be friendly to their students.”, ‘their’ shows relationship here – obviously, teachers don’t own their students. This spelling can be easily remembered if you see that the possessive forms ‘your’, ‘our’, ‘her’ and ‘their’ all have an ‘r’ and the ‘r’ is the last letter in these words. OK, let’s now move on to the last word, ‘they’re’ spelled ‘t’, ‘h’, ‘e’, ‘y’, apostrophe, ‘r’, ‘e’. The apostrophe should tell you immediately that this is a contraction – that is we have shortened and combined two words, which are ‘they’ and ‘are’. This form is used in two ways – the first is when ‘are’ is used as a linking verb with a noun or adjective. For example, “They’re dancers.” “They’re tired.” What I’m saying here is “They are dancers.” and “They are tired” but again, when we speak naturally, we just say ‘they’re’. The second use is with a verb in its –ing form. In this use, ‘are’ is a helping verb. Here’s a sentence: “They’re playing football in the garden.” This means “They are playing football in the garden” and it’s in the present continuous tense. It shows an action that is happening right now. You can remember this spelling with the apostrophe which shows that there are two words combined – ‘they’ and ‘are’. OK let’s do a quick recap. ‘T’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘r’ ‘e’ means ‘that place’ and the key to remember it is that the word has ‘here’ inside of it. ‘T ’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘i’ ‘r’ is the possessive form of ‘they’. The key to remember is that the forms ‘our’, ‘your’, ‘her’ and ‘their’ end with the letter ‘r’. And finally, ‘t’ ‘h’ ‘e’ ‘y’ apostrophe ‘r’ ‘e’ means ‘they are’ and the key is that the apostrophe shows the contraction of the two words. Alright, it’s now time for the quiz to see if you can use the three spellings correctly. There are six sentences on the screen. In each one, I want you to fill in the blanks with the correct word. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers. Let me know how many you got correct in the comments. If you’re not sure about any of these, you can ask me in the comments section as well. If you liked this video give it a thumbs up by hitting the like button. If you’re new to my channel, make sure to subscribe by clicking the subscribe button to get my latest lessons right here on YouTube. Happy learning and I will see you in another lesson soon.
Views: 31130 Learn English Lab
Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 700789 Learn English Lab
Learn Telephone English - 100 Sentences You Can Use on the Phone | How to Talk on the Phone
 
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Learn 100 useful sentences that you can use on the phone. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Full list of sentences: MAKING A CALL INTRODUCTION (FORMAL) Hi / Hello. This is (your name) from (company name). Ex: This is Ganesh from ZoomFin Financial Services. My name is (your name). I’m calling from (company name). Ex: Hello, my name is Ganesh. I’m calling from ZoomFin Financial services. INTRODUCTION (INFORMAL) Hi / Hey. It’s (your name). Ex: Hey Annie, it’s Ganesh. How’s it going? How are you? Good, thanks. Great, thanks. What about you? What’s up? Not much. The usual. ASKING FOR SOMEONE (FORMAL) May I speak to (person’s name)? Ex: May I speak to Douglas Adams? Could I speak with (person’s name), please? Ex: Could I speak with Mary Smith, please? I’d like to speak to (person’s name), please? Ex: I’d like to speak to Vijay Kumar, please. Could you put me through to technical support, please? ASKING FOR SOMEONE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Is Doug there? Is Mary around? Can I talk to Vijay? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (FORMAL) I’m calling to ask about… Ex: I’m calling to ask about your software consulting services. Could you tell me…? Ex: Could you tell me how much it costs? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) I just wanted to ask… Ex: I just wanted to ask if you’re free to meet sometime this week. ASKING WHEN SOMEONE WILL BE AVAILABLE When would be a good time to call? When will he be back? Do you know when she’ll be back? LEAVING A MESSAGE Could you take a message for him? I’d like to leave her a message. Please ask her to call me back. Could you ask him to call me back? Please tell him that I’m in town. Please let her know that I would like to meet her. TAKING A CALL Good morning/Good afternoon. (Company name), (your name) speaking. Thank you for calling (company name). This is (your name). How may I help you? What can I do for you today? Ex: Good afternoon. ZoomFin Financial Services. Ganesh speaking. How may I help you? Ex: Thank you for calling ZoomFin Financial Services. This is Ganesh. What can I do for you today? ASKING WHO’S CALLING Could I ask who’s calling? May I ask who’s calling? Who’s calling, please? Where are you calling from, please? TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (FORMAL) Please hold. Let me transfer you. I’ll put you through now. I’m connecting you now. TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Just a moment Hold on. Hang on a second. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (FORMAL) I’m sorry, he’s on another call right now. I’m sorry, she’s not here today. I’m afraid he’s not available at the moment. I’m afraid she’s left for the day. He’s not in his office right now. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) She’s out of town. He’s not home right now. She isn’t back from work yet. He’s gone to the movies with his friends. TAKING A MESSAGE Can I take a message? Would you like to leave a message? I’ll give her your message as soon as she gets back. I’ll ask him to call you as soon as he gets back. I’ll let her know that you called. MISDIALED CALLS I’m sorry, there’s nobody here by that name. I think you’ve dialed the wrong number. ASKING FOR INFORMATION Would you happen to know…? Ex: Would you happen to know when the conference takes place? Can you give me…? Ex: Can you give me a tentative date? Can I have…? Ex: Can I have your name and number, please? CHECKING INFORMATION Could you spell that for me? Let me read that back to you. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (FORMAL) Sorry, I can’t hear you very well. Could you speak a little more loudly, please? Could you speak up a little? Would you mind speaking a little more slowly? Could you repeat that? Could I call you back, please? It looks like we have a bad connection. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (INFORMAL) I didn’t catch what you just said. I’m sorry, what was that? Can you say that again? Can I call you back? Sorry, you’re breaking up. MAKING ARRANGEMENTS How about (day/date)? Ex: How about next Friday? Would (day/date) work for you? Ex: Would tomorrow work for you? Shall we say (day/date)? Ex: Shall we say September 12? ASKING FOR SUGGESTIONS/PREFERENCES What would you suggest? What would you prefer? Do you have a place in mind? MAKING REQUESTS Could you send me the details by email, please? Would you mind calling back tomorrow? RESPONDING TO A REQUEST Yes, I’d be happy to. Sure, no problem. I’ll email you the details right away. Sorry. I can’t do that. I’m afraid I don’t have that information. I’ll have to get back to you on that. ENDING THE CALL (FORMAL) It was nice talking to you. Thank you for your help. Thank you for your time. Thanks for calling. Have a nice day. ENDING THE CALL (INFORMAL) Anyway, I should get going. Take care. You too. Talk to you later. Bye.
Views: 383718 Learn English Lab
How to use 'USED TO' correctly - Basic English Grammar
 
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In this video, you'll learn how to use 'USED TO' correctly and avoid common errors that many learners of English make. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome. My name is Ganesh, I'm from LearnEnglishLab.com and in today's lesson we're going to talk about how to use 'used to' correctly. Now this is one of the most misunderstood and misused areas of grammar and by that I mean, many students don't understand the structure and they make a lot of mistakes with it. Well that's why we have this lesson today and after watching this video you won't be making any of those mistakes. Alright now the first and most important thing that you need to keep in mind is that 'used to' talks about the past. It doesn't talk about the present or the future, it talks about the past. Now there is one situation where you can use it to talk about the present but I will tell you what that is at the end of this video but it's not that common so you don't have to really worry about it. Just remember that we use 'used to' to talk about the past. In talking about the past 'used to' has two purposes - the first is to refer to past habits. Take a look at this sentence I have over here - "I used to play soccer in high school." Now when you hear me saying that sentence you should immediately think of two things - first, this happened in the past, and second - this was a habit in the past. That means I'm not saying I played soccer one time in high school No, I'm saying "I used to play soccer in high school" - that means it was a habit for me, and I did it repeatedly. Have a look at this timeline I've got. Let's say that that side is the future, this is now or the present and over on this side is the past. All of these are the action and the action is I used to play soccer in high school. So you can see that I did the action regularly or repeatedly. So it was a habit for me. In the second sentence "Matt used to drink coffee every morning." So once again Matt did it every day. He did it as a habit. You also know that Matt perhaps does not do it now because we're saying Matt used to drink coffee every morning. So maybe Matt drinks tea now or he doesn't drink anything in the morning. So that's one way to use 'used to', that is to talk about past habits. The second is to talk about states or situations that are no longer true. What do I mean by that? Well have a look at sentence number three - Karen used to live in Vermont. Notice that living is not really a habit because it's not something that we do repeatedly - it's simply a state - a state of being or a situation. And this is a situation that was true in the past so Karen started living in Vermont at some point and she lived in Vermont for some period of time and then the situation finished. So let's extend the sentence - we can say "Karen used to live in Vermont but now she lives in New York." So that means she stopped living in Vermont and at some point she moved to New York. In our last sentence, "The office used to be very tidy when Frank was the manager." What do you understand when you hear that sentence? Well I'm not really happy about the new manager because I'm saying the office used to be very tidy when Frank was the manager. So you know that that situation is now finished. Frank is not the manager anymore and the office is not very tidy anymore. Tidy means neat and clean so I'm so saying it in a sort of a negative way. I'm saying the office used to be very tidy back then and now it's not so tidy. So that again is a situation that is no longer true. Alright so now you know the two major ways that we use 'used to' - one is to talk about past habits and the second is states or situations that were true in the past and that are no longer true. OK now let's take a quick look at how to make negative sentences and questions with 'used to'. This is one place where a lot of students make mistakes. Alright take a look at what I have over here - to make negative sentences we put 'didn't' in front of 'used to' and we remove the 'd' from 'used to' - that is very important. So 'didn't use to' Let's make some negative sentences with these. In the first "I didn't use to play soccer in high school." Remember 'didn't use to'
Views: 73320 Learn English Lab
Where to Use PASSIVE VOICE - Advanced English Grammar
 
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Learn the 4 most common situations where we use the PASSIVE VOICE. See ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS here: Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 Fore more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 122054 Learn English Lab
50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English Grammar - Error Identification & Correction
 
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Find out if you make the 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English, and learn how to avoid them. See all GRAMMAR LESSONS here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ***** ALSO CHECK OUT ***** 1. PARTS OF SPEECH LESSONS: https://goo.gl/ouZgqu 2. TENSES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/7t5Hkg 3. MODAL VERBS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 4. CONDITIONALS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/prd7ex 5. ARTICLES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/3xdcJP
Views: 523959 Learn English Lab
DO or MAKE? - English Grammar - Difference Between 'Do' and 'Make' - with Examples & Exercises
 
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In this lesson, you will learn how to use DO and MAKE correctly. See Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 This video will also teach you common expressions including: do exercises, do business, do a favor, make a list, make the bed, do the shopping, make an effort etc. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ PHRASE vs. CLAUSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z45UdL0WTro&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome to Learn English Lab. My name is Ganesh and in this lesson I'm going to teach you how to use make and do correctly. Before we begin just remember if you have any questions at all just put them in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. Ok now with make and do if you're like most students you might have wondered why do we use make with some actions and do with other actions. Well unfortunately there's no single rule in English that I can give you and say in all of these situations use make and in all of these situations use do. There's no such rule in English. However there is a simple guideline that you can follow to make the right choice in most situations, and that is that we use do to talk about activities and we use make to talk about creating, producing or constructing something. Let's talk about do first Now when I say do this verb can occur in any of these forms - it can occur as do in the present simple tense, it can occur as did in the past simple, done is the past participle form and doing is the -ing or the continuous form. One very common use of do is to talk about jobs or tasks such as homework. Children have to do their homework. They don't make their homework - that doesn't really mean anything, children do their homework. OK or you might have to do your housework. Housework means things around the house - cleaning washing etc. For example with dishes or laundry we use do. Let's say your friend calls you and your friend asks "Hey what are you doing?" and you might say "Hey I can't talk now, I'm doing the dishes" or "I'm doing the laundry." Can I call you back later? That means you're washing the dishes or you're washing your clothes. You can also do a job or if you're a businessperson you do business. We don't use make with any of these. We also use do to talk about exercise and physical activities. It's very important to do exercise regularly or you might do yoga for example. You will also find do in this sort of structure. You'll have do and then you'll have a quantity expression like some, a lot of, a little bit etc. and then you will have a verb with -ing like walking, shopping or sightseeing. For example, yesterday evening I had some free time so I did some walking around the neighborhood. I did some walking around the neighborhood Tomorrow if I have time, I might do a little bit of shopping. When I went to Spain on vacation with my family, we did a lot of sightseeing. We did a lot of sightseeing So this is a very useful form that you can use - do and then a quantity expression like some, a lot of etc. and then an -ing form. Number three is a very common expression in English - Can you do me a favor? Some people make mistakes with this - they use make sometimes. That's wrong. Can you do me a favor? Favor is basically a way of asking for help but a favor is a little bit stronger; the other person might have to make a lot of effort to do you a favor, and usually this means that you will return the favor in some future time. That is you will help them in return sometime in the future. The expression is Can you do me a favor? And finally with any of these words and all of these talk about activities in general without being specific: anything, nothing something, everything etc. With all of these we only use do. For example let's say you meet a friend and you ask that friend Hey what are you doing on Saturday? and your friend says "Oh I'm not doing anything or I'm doing nothing on Saturday/" and then you might ask "Oh do you want to do something?"
Views: 105206 Learn English Lab
100 English Sentences You Can Use in Conversation | Spoken English for Beginners | Short Sentences
 
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Here are 100 short English sentences that you can use in everyday conversations. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. FULL LIST OF SENTENCES: BASIC GREETINGS Saying hello 1. How's it going? 2. How are things? 3. What's up? 4. Nice to meet you. 5. Long time, no see. 6. How have you been? Responding to a greeting 7. Great, thanks. 8. How about you? 9. Not much. 10. The usual. Saying goodbye 11. I've got to get going. 12. It was a pleasure meeting you. 13. See you later. 14. Stay in touch. ASKING FOR INFORMATION 15. Could you tell me what this word means? 16. Would you happen to know where the library is? HESITATING 17. That's a good question. 18. Let me see. 19. Let me think for a moment. ASKING FOR REPETITION 20. Excuse me? 21. Sorry, I didn't catch that. 22. Would you mind repeating that? 23. Can / Could you speak a little more slowly, please? SAYING I DON'T KNOW 24. I'm afraid I have no idea. 25. Can't help you there, sorry. 26. Beats me. OPINIONS Asking for someone's opinion 27. What do you think about that? 28. What are your views on this? Giving your opinion 29. I think that's a good idea. 30. I honestly don't think it's going to work. 31. As far as I'm concerned, this is the best restaurant in town. AVOIDING A QUESTION 32. I don't have an opinion on the matter. 33. Let me get back to you on that. 34. I'm not at liberty to say. AGREEING AND DISAGREEING Expressing agreement 35. I couldn't agree more. 36. You're absolutely right. 37. I agree with you 100 percent. 38. You hit the nail on the head. Expressing disagreement 39. I'm not sure I agree. 40. I'm afraid I disagree. 41. I think you're mistaken. INTERRUPTING POLITELY 42. Sorry to interrupt you. 43. Can I stop you there for a moment? 44. Do you I mind if I jump in here? Allowing interruption 45. Go ahead. 46. Sure, go on. Refusing interruption 47. Let me finish. 48. Hold on for a moment. SUGGESTIONS Making suggestions 49. What do you say we go to the movies? 50. How about having pizza for dinner tonight? Responding to suggestions 51. That would be great! 52. Sounds good to me. 53. I'm not sure about that. 54. No, I don't think so. MAKING PLANS Asking about and suggesting plans 55. What are you doing tonight? 56. Got any plans for tomorrow? 57. Are you free next Saturday? 58. Do you want to do something this weekend? Saying yes to a plan 59. Sure. What do you have in mind? 60. I'm free all weekend. Let's do something. Saying no to a plan 61. No, sorry, I've already made some plans. 62. I'm actually kind of busy tomorrow. 63. I'd love to do something but I can't. PERMISSION Asking for permission 64. Do you mind if I use your cellphone? 65. Would it be OK if I took the day off tomorrow? Giving permission 66. Yes, please do. 67. Sure, go ahead. 68. No, not at all. Refusing permission 69. Unfortunately, I have to say no. 70. I'd rather you didn't. 71. I'm afraid I do. MAKING REQUESTS 72. Can / Could you pass me the salt, please? 73. Would you mind lending me some money? 74. I was wondering if you could help me with this. Responding to a request 75. Sure, no problem. 76. Yeah, of course. 77. I'd be glad to help. 78. Sorry, I can't right now. 79. I'm afraid I can't. MAKING OFFERS 80. Can I get you a glass of water? 81. How about some ice cream? 82. Would you like me to give you a ride home? Responding to an offer 83. Yes, please. 84. That would be great, thanks. 85. I'm OK, but thanks for offering. 86. No, I'm good. Thanks. THANKING PEOPLE 87. Thanks a million. 88. Cheers. 89. I really appreciate it. 90. That's very kind of you. 91. I can't thank you enough. Responding to thanks 92. It's nothing. 93. Don't mention it. 94. Any time. 95. My pleasure. ASKING SOMEONE TO WAIT 96. Can you hold on a moment, please? 97. Hang on one second. 98. Bear with me just a moment. 99. I'll be right with you. APOLOGIZING Making an apology 100. I'm really sorry about that. 101. Please accept my apologies. Accepting an apology 102. Don't worry about it. 103. No worries.
Views: 1094760 Learn English Lab
Learn English Listening Skills - 10 GREAT Techniques to Improve Your Listening - Understand Natives
 
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Learn 10 great techniques to improve your English listening skills and understand native speakers. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Links and resources: NEWS ON YOUTUBE BBC News: https://www.youtube.com/user/bbcnews CNN: https://www.youtube.com/user/CNN Fox News: https://www.youtube.com/user/FoxNewsChannel ABC News: https://www.youtube.com/user/ABCNews MSNBC: https://www.youtube.com/user/msnbcleanforward ONLINE RADIO BBC Radio: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio PODCASTS Learning English podcasts (Voice of America): https://learningenglish.voanews.com/programs/radio LearnEnglish podcasts (British Council): https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/learnenglish-podcasts The English We Speak (by BBC): http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/tae Luke's English Podcast: https://teacherluke.co.uk/ ENGLISH MOVIES & TV SHOWS Netflix - http://www.netflix.com Amazon Prime Video - http://www.primevideo.com Note: Both of the above websites (Netflix and Amazon Prime Video) are not free. They are paid services. AUDIOBOOKS YouTube search: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=audiobooks TED TED (main channel): https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector TEDx Talks: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDxTalks TED-Ed: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDEducation MORE OF MY LESSONS: The Basics of English Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/xXKi1G 1 Simple Method to Increase Your Vocabulary (the 3R technique): https://goo.gl/iNRGKx Transcript: Do you find it difficult to understand native speakers of English? Do you feel that they speak too fast and most of the time you can’t catch what they’re saying? If your answer is yes, then this video is for you. In this lesson, I am going to give you 10 proven methods to improve your English listening skills. I will also give you lots of links to free online resources for you to practice. The techniques that I share with you will help you to understand native speakers when you watch TV, movies or listen to the radio. They will help you develop your listening ability for exams like the IELTS, TOEFL or PTE. And finally, these methods will help you to understand people better in real- life conversations. So let’s start. Number one is listen to English every day. You want to know the secret to great listening skills? It’s lots and lots of listening practice. Remember that the more you listen, the better you get at listening. The reason you find listening difficult is probably that you’re not practicing enough. My advice is that you listen to English for at least one hour per day. Set aside a specific time, maybe an hour in the morning or in the evening and during this time, just listen to English. With this type of practice, I have seen great improvement in my students’ listening skills within 2-3 months. A great way to do this is to watch the news. The TV is a good source of news but since we’re on YouTube, you should know that you can watch a lot of English news right here. Major news networks like BBC, CNN etc. have YouTube channels where they put out short news videos that are ideal for improving your listening. You will find all the links in the description below. Tip number three is listen to the radio. The radio is great for listening because you can do it while you are doing other things. You can listen as you’re driving, while working out, while you’re cleaning the house. You can listen with a radio set, on your computer, or even on your smartphone. Now, if you listen on your phone while driving, please be careful, please don’t operate your phone while you’re driving. OK, in my opinion, BBC radio is the best radio service for English learners and it’s available for listening online free of cost. There are many different BBC radio stations available; BBC Radio 4 is particularly good because it has a lot of informative shows. Again, links are below. Another highly useful listening resource is podcasts. A podcast is basically a radio show that you can find only on the internet. The reason I love podcasts is that there are many shows that specialize in particular topics. This means there are podcasts just for English learners. These audio lessons will not only help you to improve your listening skills but you can also learn about grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and more. I have put links to some very good free podcasts in the description below. You can also go online and find shows related to your own interests. You should make podcasts a regular part of your listening practice. Number five is watch movies in English. This is one of my favorite methods for improving listening skills because this is how I did it.
Views: 106989 Learn English Lab
LAY vs LIE - English Grammar Explained
 
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Lay and Lie are two words that a lot of people, including many native English speakers, find confusing. In this video, we explain and clarify the difference between these two words. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9&index=27 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 46338 Learn English Lab
10 FOOD IDIOMS - Learn Interesting Idioms - Vocabulary Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you will learn 10 interesting IDIOMS inspired by one of life's greatest pleasures - FOOD! Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 83152 Learn English Lab
SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK - What's the difference? - English Grammar
 
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What's the difference between the verbs say, tell, speak and talk? Find out in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ PHRASE vs. CLAUSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z45UdL0WTro&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 227315 Learn English Lab
SIMPLE, COMPOUND, COMPLEX SENTENCES - with Examples, Exercises - Sentence Clause Structure - Grammar
 
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Learn the difference between SIMPLE, COMPOUND, and COMPLEX sentences, and how to us them correctly. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus 2. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY 3. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI 4. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 236060 Learn English Lab
MIXED CONDITIONALS - English Grammar Lesson - Mixed Verb Tenses in If-Clauses - Advanced Grammar
 
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Learn all about MIXED CONDITIONALS in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome back. This lesson is all about mixed conditionals. It comes from a request by three viewers – Przemek, Nihar (from Odisha, India) and Olivia Ornelas. Before we start, if you want to request a lesson, just leave a comment. In your comment, tell me your name and I will mention you in the video. Alright, so in this lesson, I will teach you about mixed conditionals in both real and unreal situations (unreal means imaginary). There are exercises in this lesson for you to understand and practice. OK first, let’s start with the most basic type of conditional – the real conditional. Take a look at this example: “If it rains on Saturday, we’ll cancel the picnic.” So what do you understand by that? Well, you know that there’s a picnic planned for Saturday, and if it rains, we cannot go on the picnic, so we’ll cancel it. This is the most common type of conditional: on the condition side – we call it a condition clause, you have ‘if’ plus the subject plus the verb in the present simple tense. So, you have ‘if’ and ‘it rains’ which is present simple. On the result side (in the result clause), you have ‘subject’ plus ‘will’. So – ‘we’ll cancel’ (or we will cancel) ‘the picnic.’ This is called a real conditional. It’s also called the first conditional but the number is not important – what’s important is that it talks about a real situation – a situation that is possible. So about mixed conditionals? Well, the term ‘mixed’ just means that a sentence is in a different form – not the usual form. So, you could say “If it rains on Saturday, we’ll have to cancel the picnic.” (so instead of will plus the main verb, here you have ‘will have to’) or you could say “If it rains on Saturday, could you bring some umbrellas?” or maybe I just saw the weather forecast on the news and I say “How are we going to have a picnic if it rains on Saturday?” These are all correct, and they’re some examples of mixed real conditionals. Remember: we say that they’re mixed because they’re not in the common form. OK, let’s do a small exercise with this. Here are some sentences. But I’ve jumbled them up. Stop the video, try to put them in the right order, then play the video again and check. Alright, number one is “If you don’t mind, could you speak a little more slowly, please?” Number two is “If Rob wants to get into a top university, he needs to work harder.” And number three is “When you leave the house, remember to lock the front door.” In conditional sentences, it’s always OK to put the if- clause last – if you did that, no problem. OK, notice, in number three – you have ‘when’ instead of ‘if’. The difference is that ‘if’ means something may happen or it may not happen – so “If you leave the house,” would mean you may or may not leave the house. But ‘when’ expresses the idea that you are going to leave the house (I’m sure), and when you leave the house, remember to lock the front door. So you can see here that these are all mixed real conditionals – they all talk about real situations but they’re in different forms. Let’s now move on and talk about unreal conditionals. What do I mean by unreal? Unreal refers to situations that are imaginary. Take these two sentences: “If I win the lottery, I will quit my job.” and “If I won the lottery, I would quit my job.” You will recognize the first sentence as a real conditional. So imagine that I have bought a lottery ticket. And the results are coming out tomorrow, so I have my fingers crossed, I hope I win. And if I win, I’ll go into my boss’s office and say “I quit”. So you have ‘if’ and present simple in the condition, and ‘will’ in the result.
Views: 47508 Learn English Lab
7 Stylish Ways to Ask HOW ARE YOU - Improve Your Conversation Skills
 
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In this lesson, you will learn 7 stylish ways to ask 'how are you?' Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 144690 Learn English Lab
Speak English Fluently Like a Native Speaker with Just 10 WORDS! - Gonna, wanna, gotta, gimme etc.
 
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Learn how to speak English fluently like a native speaker with just 10 words! Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Are you looking to improve your English pronunciation? Would you like to sound more natural and like a native speaker when you talk? Well this video will help you to do exactly that. In this lesson, I'm going to teach you 10 English words that are used very commonly in everyday conversation. These are key to both speaking fluently and sounding like a native speaker when you talk. So what are these ten words? They are gonna, wanna, hafta and gotta, kinda, gimme, lemme, cuz, shoulda coulda and woulda. I'll show you how to say all of these correctly. There are important grammar notes and bonus words at the end so make sure to watch the full video. Now, a quick note before we start: just remember that these spellings are only for understanding the pronunciation. When you write, please do not write these spellings. Write the full forms (like going to). Alright so let's start with the first word - gonna. Gonna is a reduction of going to and it's used when we talk about the future. Notice that it's not /'go.nə/. It's pronounced /'gə.nə/. Here are some sentences. Practice saying them after me. I'm gonna buy a car. What are you gonna eat? I think it's gonna rain soon. OK, let's move on to number two - 'wanna;. This is a reduction of want to. I wanna see a movie tonight. Do you wanna come with us? The children wanna play outside. If the subject of a sentence is he/she/it or any singular noun, we add 's' to the verb want and it becomes wants to. This can be reduced to wantsta. He wants to leave. She wants to see you. Number three is hafta. This is a reduction of have to. We say hafta because it's easier to say that way. I hafta go now. You hafta wait for me. We hafta pay for the meal. If the subject is he/she/it or a singular noun, we use has to which is reduced to hasta. He hasta do his homework. She hasta work tomorrow. In English, have to and has to can also be expressed as have got to or has got to and they mean the same thing. Got to can be reduced to gotta so you can say I've gotta go now. You've gotta wait for me. We've gotta pay for the meal. He's gotta do his homework. She's gotta work tomorrow. Let's move on to number four - kinda. This is kind of and it means type of. There's some kinda problem with my phone. But it can also be used to express something negative politely. This movie is kinda boring. She's kinda rude. This room is kinda dirty. Number five is gimme. This is a reduction of give me. Could you gimme a ride home? Gimme a second. I'll be right with you. Can you gimme change for 10 dollars? A related word is lemme which is a reduction of let me. Lemme help you with that. Lemme know if you need anything. Lemme get back to you on that. Let's move on to number seven - cuz. This is a reduction of the word because. We missed the train cuz we were late. Ben got fired cuz he yelled at his boss. I'm not gonna eat anything cuz I'm not hungry. Next up is shoulda. This is basically should have. You shoulda studied more for your exam. I shoulda brought more money. i shouldna quit my job. You shouldna eaten that pizza. Number nine is coulda which is a reduction of could have. He coulda bought Jane a birthday present. They coulda called us before coming. I couldna done it without your help. She couldna called me because she doesn't have my number. And finally number ten is woulda which is a reduction of would have. If I had known it was going to rain I woulda brought my umbrella. Liz woulda gotten the promotion if she had worked harder. I wouldna gotten so angry if you had told me the truth. If you had been driving more carefully you wouldna had the accident. OK now that you've practiced saying the words let's look at a couple of important grammar notes relating to them. All of the forms that you just learned are informal expressions meaning that it's not a good idea to use them in formal situations for example when you talk to your boss at work or when you're giving a speech In those cases use the full forms. Also you should never use these in writing When you write use the correct spelling going to, want to etc. But the good news is that you can use these reductions in all other speaking situations and they will help you to sound more like a native speaker of English. Grammar point number two relates to gonna. In the sentence I'm gonna buy a car notice that there is a main verb - that is an action - buy. So going to or gonna just acts as a helping verb to show that we are talking about the future. But have a look at these sentences - I'm going to California next week. Are you going to the party on Saturday? In both of these sentences going is the main verb.
Views: 371303 Learn English Lab
READING COMPREHENSION in Exams, Tests - Strategies, Tips and Tricks - Building Reading Skills
 
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In this lesson, you will learn strategies for READING COMPREHENSION exercises in exams and tests. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 Transcript: Hello and welcome back. This lesson comes from a request by Aditya from Maharashtra, India. Aditya says he is preparing for a competitive exam and he has to do reading comprehension exercises as part of the exam, and he wants to know the best way to do these. Before we start, if you want to request a lesson, just leave a comment. In your comment, tell me your name, and I will mention you in the video. OK, in this lesson I will give you some important tips and strategies for reading comprehension exercises. I will give you a reading plan that you can follow, and there are exercises in this lesson for you to practice. Alright, now my teaching experience is mostly with exams like the IELTS and TOEFL, but the tips that I give you in this lesson will help you in any exam situation. So the first thing is: when it comes to reading in an exam, budget your time. That means: you should know how many reading passages there are in the exam, how many exercises there are and how much time you have. In the IELTS exam, for example, there are three reading passages and you have one hour to do all of them. So then divide your time amongst those passages – for IELTS, you might spend roughly 20 minutes per passage. In some exams, one passage might be shorter or easier, and another passage might be longer or more difficult. In that case, obviously, you should plan to spend less time on the short passage, and more time on the long passage. And you should time yourself – if you are allowed to wear a watch in your exam, look at your watch and keep track of the time. If you plan for 20 minutes per passage, stick to that plan. Now, if you’re not allowed to wear a watch, then use the clock in the room or hall, or ask the invigilators how much time you have left. Alright, that’s the first thing: budgeting your time. So now the exam starts – and you have the first reading passage in front of you – what do you do? Well, I’ll tell you what you should NOT do – don’t start at the beginning and read slowly to the finish. Many students do this – and the problem is that when you get to the end, you will have forgotten a lot of the details in the middle, and when you read the questions, you have to go back and read the passage again to find the answers. Instead, here’s the plan that you should follow: your first step in reading should be to skim the passage. What does that mean? Well, skimming is actually something that we do with milk. It’s when you heat or boil milk, and the fat rises to the top in the form of cream. Removing that layer of fat is called skimming. When it comes to reading, skimming means to read the surface of the text quickly to understand the overall message. So if there’s a heading or title to the passage, and if there are subheadings, read all of these first. They will tell you the subject of the text. Then read the first sentence of each paragraph – they will give you a good idea of the overall message. Let’s practice this. You see two paragraphs on the screen, but only the first sentence in each paragraph is visible. Stop the video, read the sentences and try to understand the main topic in each paragraph. Alright, so what do you think the topic of the whole passage might be? It could be the negative effects of social media on children. What about the first paragraph? What is it about? Well it says that using social media can affect a child’s writing skills. And the second paragraph? It says that some people don’t agree with this – that is, the first paragraph – for two reasons: scientific reasons and practical reasons (pragmatic).
Views: 213630 Learn English Lab
GOT vs. GOTTEN - What's the difference? - English Grammar
 
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What's the difference between GOT and GOTTEN? Learn how to use them correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9
Views: 35524 Learn English Lab
HAVE, HAS, HAD - English Grammar Basics - Difference Between Have and Has - When to Use Had
 
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Are you sometimes confused how to use HAVE, HAS and HAD correctly? Watch this lesson and learn the proper use of these forms. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello there and welcome. My name is Ganesh - I'm from LearnEnglishLab.com And in this lesson we're going to discuss where to use have, has and had. This is a very popular question among a lot of English learners. Now before we get into the rules, remember that the verb have is the base form. That means that has, and had are not different verbs, they're all just different forms of the same verb which is have. So we're going to call this the base form. This verb is used in two ways. First, it's used to show possession. This means that it shows that you have something. For example if I say I have a car it means that I own a car. Or you can say She has two sisters. That of course does not mean that she owns her sisters. It just means that she is related to these two people her family. They're her sisters. So here it shows the relationship between them. So in that way it shows possession. Now have can also be used as a helping verb Here I have two sentences in the present perfect tense. If you look at this sentence over here I have finished my homework. In this sentence have is not showing that someone has something, that's not the function. In this sentence the main verb is finished that's the main verb. Have is helping this verb and if you hear the sentence, if someone says I have finish my homework then you might guess that maybe they've just finished their homework. Or if a kid tells us to his mother he says Mom I've just finished or I've finished my homework. Can I go out and play now? Then there's some connection between his finishing the homework and the present because he wants to go out. So here, it's helping the main verb and it's the same thing over here Pierre has got a new job. If you hear this you would guess the Pierre has maybe recently got a job, that's the function of has over here. So have is used in two main ways - one is to show possession and two as a helping verb OKnow let's talk about where to use have, has and had. Now which one you choose, that is which form of have you choose will depend on two things - it depends on the tense of the sentence and it also depends on the subject of the sentence. Remember that the subject is who or what is doing the action. Let's first look at the present tense. If you have a sentence in the present tense and if the subject is I, you, we, they or any plural noun, then you will use the base form - that is have. So in sentence, Paul and Amber have a beautiful house. This sentence in the present tense and here, we have a plural because it's Paul and Amber - two people, so we're using have. Now if this was only Paul, then we would use have We might say Paul has a beautiful house. or Amber has a beautiful house. But because it's two people - Paul and Amber, we use have. Paul and amber have a beautiful house. Now if the subject is I or you or we or they, we still use have. So I have a beautiful house. or You have a beautiful house. We have beautiful house etc. Have a look at this sentence. Here, Murray has a degree in economics. Murray is a singular noun, so if you have a sentence in the present tense but the subject is he, she, it or any singular noun, then we will use has. Murray, once again, is a singular noun so Murray has a degree in economics. He has a degree in economics. She has a degree in economics etc. Over here I have two sentences for you in the present perfect tense - I have taught English for six years. We're using have because the subject is I, But look at this sentence - He has taught English for six years. Now both of these sentences are basically just the same The only difference is the subject which is I here and he here. But because the subject is I the verb is have and because the subject is He, the verb form becomes has That is the only difference here. So all of these are sentences in the present tense. Now let's talk about the past tense. If you have a sentence in the past tense well it's good news, because no matter what subject you have, you will always use had. So here They had a car. That means they don't have a car now - They had a car in the past. But we're using had because it's in the past tense.
Views: 174332 Learn English Lab
CONDITIONALS - FIRST, SECOND, THIRD - Advanced English Grammar
 
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Do you know the difference between the FIRST, SECOND and THIRD conditionals in English? Learn how to use them correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ SHOULD HAVE, COULD HAVE, WOULD HAVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6F73hOX_I&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE, HAS, HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09S3IoRCbSg&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ HAVE HAD, HAS HAD, HAD HAD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYfq00CswV8&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel.
Views: 175417 Learn English Lab