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63 Road Signs   Highwaycode UK
 
04:53
BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycode here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 63 Road Signs Highwaycode UK for practice on the highway code theory test theory test highway code
Views: 1268448 ESL and Popular Culture
Invictus ~ poem by William Ernest Henley with text
 
01:00
PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 "Invictus" is a short Victorian poem by the English poet William Ernest Henley (1849--1903).
Views: 409461 ESL and Popular Culture
Phonetic Alphabet A-Z English
 
01:19
SEE new version HERE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f28fAVRL5Jg I mis-spelt Alfa on this one as a viewer pionted out so I re made a new one here with a new voice from a REAL pilot. It's much better all round - thank you Created can owned by rnaudioproductions for http://www.ipodity.com/ http://www.allcast.co.uk/ THe Phonetic Alphabet is used Internationally in shipping and air traffic control aswell as by the Police/Emergency AudioProductions 2007 ipodity.com allcast.co.uk mp3 ipod download book audiobooks I have now set up a site with over 200 classic poems in English - all with full text in the information box. Shakespeare, Poe, Oscar Wilde, Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, William Blake and many more... Lots to add to ;rnaudioproductions for http://www.ipodity.com/ http://www.allcast.co.uk/ Heres one famous one about a Tiger : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTMPJVDOoag Audio created by Robert Nichol AudioProductions all rights reserved ipodity.com allcast.co.uk mp3 ipod download book audiobooks
Views: 591324 ESL and Popular Culture
Phonetic Alphabet ~ The NATO Phonetic Alphabet
 
01:55
Please see my channel playlists https://www.youtube.com/user/LearnFree2007 The NATO phonetic alphabet, more accurately known as the International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet and also called the ICAO phonetic or ICAO spelling alphabet, as well as the ITU phonetic alphabet, is the most widely used spelling alphabet. Although often called "phonetic alphabets", spelling alphabets are unassociated with such phonetic transcription systems as the International Phonetic Alphabet; instead, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) alphabet assigned code words acrophonically to the letters of the English alphabet so that critical combinations of letters and numbers can be pronounced and understood despite language barriers or transmission static. The 26 code words in the NATO phonetic alphabet are assigned to the 26 letters of the English alphabet in alphabetical order as follows: Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, Zulu. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_phonetic_alphabet
Views: 161478 ESL and Popular Culture
Edgar Allan Poe ~ A Dream Within A Dream, Poem with text
 
01:44
Please click here for Edgar Allan Poe playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 "A Dream Within a Dream" is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. The poem is 24 lines, divided into two stanzas. The poem questions the way one can distinguish between reality and fantasy, asking, "Is all that we see or seem but a dream within a dream?" The poem dramatizes a confusion in watching the important things in life slip away.[1] Realizing he cannot hold onto even one grain of sand leads to his final question that all things are a dream.[2] The poem references "golden sand," an image derived from the 1848 discovery of gold in California. The poem was first published in the March 31, 1849 edition of a Boston-based periodical called Flag of Our Union.[2] The same publication had only two weeks before first published Poe's short story "Hop-Frog." The next month, owner Frederick Gleason announced it could no longer pay for whatever articles and poems it published. Audio recording copyright Robert Nichol Audio Productions London
Views: 140867 ESL and Popular Culture
Tyger! Tyger! burning bright  ~ poem reading with text
 
01:24
PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 "The Tyger" is a poem by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794 (see 1794 in poetry). It is one of Blake's best-known and most analyzed poems. The Cambridge Companion to William Blake (2003) calls it "the most anthologized poem in English."[1] Most modern anthologies have kept Blake's choice of the archaic spelling "tyger". It was a common spelling of the word at the time but was already "slightly archaic"[2] when he wrote the poem; he spelled it as "tiger" elsewhere,[1] and many of his poetic effects "depended on subtle differences of punctuation and of spelling."[3] Thus, his choice of "tyger" has usually been interpreted as being for effect, perhaps to render an "exotic or alien quality of the beast",[4] or because it's not really about a "tiger" at all, but a metaphor.[1] "The Tyger" is the sister poem to "The Lamb" (from "Songs of Innocence"), a reflection of similar ideas from a different perspective, but it focuses more on goodness than evil. The poem also presents a duality between aesthetic beauty and primal ferocity. The speaker wonders whether the hand that created "The Lamb" also created "The Tyger".
Views: 207585 ESL and Popular Culture
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways ~Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poem ~
 
01:11
PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 How do I love thee? Let me count the ways ~ poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. I love thee to the level of everyday's Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. I love thee with a passion put to use In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints, --- I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears, of all my life! --- and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death. Elizabeth Barrett Browning (6 March 1806 -- 29 June 1861) was one of the most prominent poets of the Victorian era. Her poetry was widely popular in both England and the United States during her lifetime.[1] A collection of her last poems was published by her husband, Robert Browning, shortly after her death. see :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Barrett_Browning picture details : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elizabeth-Barrett-Browning,_Poetical_Works_Volume_I,_engraving.png Video produced and copyright by Robert Nichol 2012 Robert Nichol Audio Productions London
Last Post Bugle Call
 
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The "Last Post" is either a B♭ bugle call within British Infantry regiments or an E♭ cavalry trumpet call in British Cavalry and Royal Regiment of Artillery (Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Artillery) used at Commonwealth military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have been killed in war. The two regimental traditions have separate music for the call (see Trumpet & Bugle Calls for the British Army 1966). While the B♭ infantry bugle version is better known, the E♭ cavalry trumpet version is used by the state trumpeters of the Household Cavalry. Wartime Use The "Last Post" call (2nd Post) is used in British Army camps to signal the end of day when the duty officer returns from the tour of the camp and quarters. The "First Post" call marks the start of the inspection. The names are derived from the practice of inspecting all the sentry posts around such a camp at the end of the day, and playing a call at each of them. In addition to its normal garrison use, the Last Post call had another function at the close of a day of battle. It signalled to those who were still out and wounded or separated that the fighting was done, and to follow the sound of the call to find safety and rest. Its use in Remembrance Day ceremonies in Commonwealth nations has two generally unexpressed purposes: The first is an implied summoning of the spirits of the Fallen to the cenotaph, the second is to symbolically end the day, so that the period of silence before the Rouse is blown becomes in effect a ritualized night vigil. This custom dates from at least the 17th century, and originated with British troops stationed in The Netherlands, where it drew on an older Dutch custom, called taptoe, from which comes the term Tattoo as in Military tattoo, and also the term Taps. The taptoe was also used to signal the end of the day, but has more prosaic origin. Taptoe originated signalling the moment that beer taps had to be shut, hence that the day had ended. It comes from the Dutch phrase Doe den tap toe, meaning "Close the tap": however the Dutch bugle call Taptoesignaal, now used for remembrance events, is not the same tune as the Last Post. Neither Last Post nor Taptoesignaal is to be confused with the U.S. call "Taps", which has a similar function but different tune and origin. The "Last Post" was used by British forces in North America in colonial times, but its function was taken over in the United States by "Taps", which has been used by the United States Army since 1862. memorial Usage During the 19th century, the "Last Post" was also carried to the various countries of the British Empire. In all these countries it has been incorporated into military funerals, where it is played as a final farewell, symbolising the fact that the duty of the dead soldier is over and that he can rest in peace. "Last Post" is used in public ceremonials commemorating the war dead, particularly on Remembrance Day in the Commonwealth of Nations. In Australia and New Zealand it is also played on Anzac Day usually before the two-minute silence, which concludes with "The Rouse". When the post is played during services such as Anzac Day it is required of all current serving military members to salute for the duration of the call. During services organised by the Royal British Legion the recommendation is that no salute is given by either officers or troops as during the "Last Post" and Silence the recommendation is that all troops will have removed head dress (as in church service prayer), have heads bowed, weapons inverted, with flags and standards lowered. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Post
Views: 466278 ESL and Popular Culture
UK Highway Code Stopping Distances
 
01:12
BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycode here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 UK Highway Code Stopping Distances Stopping Distances Highway Code highway code theory test SEE https://www.gov.uk/highway-code
Views: 174169 ESL and Popular Culture
First Love by John Clare with text
 
01:20
PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 John Clare was born in 1793 and brought up in very poor circumstances in rural Northamptonshire in England. He was destined to become an agricultural labourer but was 'discovered' and groomed as a writer of very natural poetry. There was something of a cult for 'untutored' poets at this time, particularly those who were as close to the countryside as Clare was. However, there were tensions between him and the more sophisticated literary world in London. This poem is about his love for Mary Joyce whom he met in his native village. She was the daughter of a wealthy farmer who was never going to let the relationship develop. He later married another young woman and had a family, but their relationship was never particularly happy. In later years, Clare became mentally ill and had to be confined in an asylum. One of his delusions was that he was Lord Byron, another that he had, in fact, married Mary Joyce and his marriage to his real wife was bigamous. John Clare (13 July 1793 -- 20 May 1864) was an English poet, the son of a farm labourer, who came to be known for his celebratory representations of the English countryside and his lamentation of its disruption.[1] His poetry underwent a major re-evaluation in the late 20th century and he is often now considered to be among the most important 19th-century poets.[2] His biographer Jonathan Bate states that Clare was "the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced. No one has ever written more powerfully of nature, of a rural childhood, and of the alienated and unstable self". seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Clare picture used Ida Brun, 1811, Holmegård, Denmark painted by Johan Ludwig Lund seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan_Ludwig_Lund
Gunga Din by Rudyard Kipling 1892 with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 "Gunga Din" (1892) is a poem by Rudyard Kipling. The poem is a rhyming narrative from the point of view of an English soldier in India, about an Indian water-bearer (a "Bhishti") who saves the soldier's life but is soon shot and killed. In the final three lines, the soldier regrets the abuse he dealt to Din and admits that Din is the better man of the two for sacrificing his own life to save another. The poem was published as one of the set of martial poems called the Barrack-Room Ballads. In contrast to Kipling's later poem "The White Man's Burden," "Gunga Din" is named after the Indian, and portrays him as the hero while the English soldiers are portrayed as callous and shallow, and ultimately inferior to Gunga Din. Although "Din" is frequently pronounced to rhyme with "bin" /ˌɡʌŋɡə ˈdɪn/, the rhymes within the poem (as well as the pronunciation in the 1939 film) make it clear that it should be pronounced /ˈdin/ to rhyme with "green". Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 -- 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He is chiefly remembered for his tales and poems of British soldiers in India and his tales for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling is best known for his works of fiction, including The Jungle Book (a collection of stories which includes "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi"), Just So Stories (1902), Kim (1901) (a tale of adventure), many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888);[3][4] and his poems, including "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major "innovator in the art of the short story";[5] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and his best works are said to exhibit "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[6][7] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[5] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[5] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and to date he remains its youngest recipient.[8] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?  # Shakespeare Sonnet 18 with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Shakespeare Sonnet 18 with text
Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold  poem reading with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 -- 15 April 1888) was a British poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He was the son of Thomas Arnold, the famed headmaster of Rugby School, and brother to both Tom Arnold, literary professor, and William Delafield Arnold, novelist and colonial administrator. Matthew Arnold has been characterized as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Arnold "Dover Beach" is a short lyric poem by the English poet Matthew Arnold.[1] It was first published in 1867 in the collection New Poems, but surviving notes indicate its composition may have begun as early as 1849. The most likely date is 1851.[2] The title, locale and subject of the poem's descriptive opening lines is the shore of the English ferry port of Dover, Kent, facing Calais, France, at the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part (21 miles) of the English Channel, where Arnold honeymooned in 1851.[2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dover_Beach video created and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
POEM   For The Fallen by Laurence Binyon
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 The "Ode of Remembrance" is an ode taken from Laurence Binyon's poem, "For the Fallen", which was first published in The Times in September 1914. The poet wrote For the Fallen, which has seven stanzas, while sitting on the cliffs between Pentire Point and The Rumps in north Cornwall, UK. A stone plaque was erected at the spot in 2001 to commemorate the fact. The plaque bears the inscription: For the Fallen Composed on these cliffs 1914 There is also a plaque on the beehive monument on the East Cliff above Portreath in central North Cornwall which cites that as the place where Binyon composed the poem. A plaque on a statue dedicated to the fallen in Valleta, Malta is also inscribed with these words. The poem honoured the World War I British war dead of that time, and in particular the British Expeditionary Force, which by then already had high casualty rates on the developing Western Front. The poem was published when the Battle of the Marne was foremost in people's minds. War memorial in ChristChurch Cathedral, Christchurch, NZ Over time, the third and fourth stanzas of the poem (although often just the fourth)[1] were claimed as a tribute to all casualties of war, regardless of state. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_the_Fallen Sir William Rothenstein, Walter Sickert, Charles Ricketts, Lucien Pissarro and Edmund Dulac seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurence_Binyon Ode Of Remembrance (Published Work),Laurence Binyon,World War I (Event),1914,War Poem,war poems,English Literature (Award Discipline)
William Wordsworth ~ The Lesser Celandine poem with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. -ULYSSES by Alfred Lord Tennyson
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 ULYSSES by Alfred Lord Tennyson http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred,_Lord_Tennyson To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. Audio created by Robert Nichol AudioProductions all rights 2013
Scotland -  Clan Tartan ~ Part 1   A to L
 
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Popular Scottish Clan Tartan ~ Part 1 A to L Clan Anderson Black Watch Clan Buchanan Clan Cameron Clan Campbell Fraser Clan Gordon Clan Kennedy Clan Lindsay * see part 2 for M to S link at end of video ---------------------------------------- part 2 Clan MacDonald Clan MacFarlane Clan MacKenzie Clan MacLachlan Clan MacLaren Clan MacLeod Clan Malcolm Clan Menzies Clan Morrison Clan Stewart See http://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/ List of Scottish clans http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Scottish_clans Popular Scottish Clan Tartans,Scottish Clan Tartans,Scottish Clans,Tartan,Kilt,Scotland,visit Scotland, video produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
Road Signs   Highwaycode UK
 
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BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycod here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 63 Road Signs Highwaycode UK for practice on the highway code theory test theory test highway code
Views: 181779 ESL and Popular Culture
Byron ~ When We Two Parted ~ poem with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Byron ~ When We Two Parted ~ poem with text copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions London 2002
Famous Shakespeare ~ Macbeth ~ " Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow
 
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Shakespeare playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 English Poetry with text playlisthttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 Act 5, Scene 5, lines 19 - 28 William Shakespeare Macbeth "Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow" is the beginning of the second sentence of one of the most famous soliloquies in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth. It takes place in the beginning of the 5th scene of Act 5, during the time when the English troops, led by Malcolm and Macduff, are approaching Macbeth's castle to besiege it. Macbeth, the play's protagonist, is confident that he can withstand any siege from Malcolm's forces. He hears the cry of a woman and reflects that there was a time when his hair would have stood on end if he had heard such a cry, but he is now so full of horrors and slaughterous thoughts that it can no longer startle him. Seyton then tells Macbeth of Lady Macbeth's death, and Macbeth delivers this soliloquy as his response to the news.[1] Shortly afterwards he is told of the apparent movement of Birnam Wood towards Dunsinane Castle (as the witches previously prophesied to him), which is actually Malcolm's forces having disguised themselves with tree branches so as to disguise their numbers as they approach the castle. This sets the scene for the final events of the play and Macbeth's death at the hands of Macduff.seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomorrow_and_tomorrow_and_tomorrow In Macbeth's final soliloquy the audience sees his final conclusion about life: it is devoid of any meaning, full of contrived struggles. Days on this earth are short, a "brief candle" and an ignorant march towards a fruitless demise, "lighted fools. . . to dusty death." A person's life is so insubstantial that it is comparable to an actor who fills minor roles in an absurd play. There is a struggle for substance in life, the actor who "struts and frets his hour" or a playwright who tells a "a tale full of sound and fury" but it is contrived and senseless and will thus fade into obscurity, a tale "Told by an Idiot. . . Signifying nothing" in which a "walking shadow" performs "And then is heard no more". Macbeth's feelings towards Lady Macbeth in this soliloquy are not as clear as the main theme. There are many opinions regarding Macbeth's initial reaction when he hears that his wife is dead. Those who take the first line to mean "she would have died at sometime, either now or later" usually argue that it illustrates Macbeth's callous lack of concern for Lady Macbeth. Macbeth said in Scene III of the same act that the battle would cheer him ever after or unseat him now. Up to that time he had expected to win the battle; he was ready to laugh the siege to scorn when interrupted by a woman's cry. His visionary thought may have pictured the victory as restoring him to the man he once was. He pauses on the word "hereafter" - two feet are missing from the meter - and realises that the time will never come. Depressingly, he reflects that if it could have been, if he could have gone back, there would have been time to consider that word, death, and mourn properly. Now, however, since there will be no victory nor going back, and she is gone, the tomorrows creep on with their insignificantly slow pace to the very end of all time.
Road Signs   Highwaycode UK
 
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BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycode here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 63 Road Signs Highwaycode UK for practice on the highway code theory test theory test highway code
Views: 180225 ESL and Popular Culture
Shakespeare Sonnet 73 with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Shakespeare Sonnet 73 with text
The Lamb by William Blake ~ poem with Text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 The Lamb by William Blake ~ poem with Text further information ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lamb William Blake http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Blake Audio produced by Robert Nichol picture is from ; http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/William_Blake_by_Thomas_Phillips.jpg
Highway Code -UK Road signs for driving test theory exam  pt1
 
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BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycod here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 Highway Code -UK Road signs pt1 Road signs you need to know for the driving test Real road signs as seen from a car. This demo is made for mobile phone screens so please click on the 'view smaller button' on the YouTube player to make the picture sharper, More to come including 'stopping distances' I hope they help, real sign posts have been used, filmed on location from my car. AudioProductions 2007 not BBC audio not Pearson Educational not Recorded Books teaching not Cambridge University Test not Open Learning not Linguaphone Not Oxford University Press not Bordas not Nelson Publishing - but Robert Nichol AudioProductions London ELT TEFL not BBC audio not Pearson Educational not Recorded Books teaching not Cambridge University Test not Open Learning not Linguaphone Not Oxford University Press not Bordas not Nelson Publishing - but Robert Nichol AudioProductions London ELT TEFL
Views: 223667 ESL and Popular Culture
The Owl and the Pussycat ~ poem with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Owl_and_the_Pussycat
Robert Burns ~ A Red, Red Rose  poem with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Robert Burns ~ A Red, Red Rose poem with text copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions 2011
Sonnet 3 ~ William Shakespeare ~ with text
 
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Sonnet 3 ~ William Shakespeare ~ with text copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions 2012 SONNET 3 Look in thy glass, and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another; Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother, For where is she so fair whose unear'd womb Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry? Or who is he so fond will be the tomb Of his self-love, to stop posterity? Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime: So thou through windows of thine age shall see Despite of wrinkles this thy golden time. But if thou live, remember'd not to be, Die single, and thine image dies with thee.
Flag Alphabet  ~ International maritime signal flags
 
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International maritime signal flags ~ Flag Alphabet The system of international maritime signal flags is one system of flag signals representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. It is a component of the International Code of Signals (ICS).[1] Naval flag signalling undoubtably developed in antiquity in order to coordinate naval action of multiple vessels. In the Peloponnesian War (431 -- 401 BCE) squadrons of Athenian galleys were described by Thucydides as engaging in coordinated maneuvers which would have required some kind of communication;[1] there is no record of how such communication was done but flags would have been the most likely method. Flags have long been used to identify a ship's owner or nationality, or the commander of a squadron. But the use of flags for signalling messages long remained primitive, as indicated by the 1530 instruction that when the Admiral doth doth shote of a pece of Ordnance, and set up his Banner of Council on Starrborde bottocke of his Shippe, everie shipps capten shall with spede go aborde the Admyrall to know his will.[2] Several wars with the Dutch in the 17th century prompted the English to issue instructions for the conduct of particular fleets, such as (in 1673) the Duke of York's "Instructions for the better Ordering of His Majesties Fleet in Sayling". Signals were primitive and rather ad hoc ("As soon as the Admiral shall loose his fore-top and fire a gun..."), and generally a one-way communication system, as only flagships carried a complete set of flags. In 1790 Admiral Lord Howe issued a new signal book for a numerary system using numeral flags to signal a number; the number, not the mast from which the flags flew, indicated the message. Other admirals tried various systems; it was not until 1799 that the Admiralty issued a standardized signal code system for the entire Royal Navy. This was limited to only the signals listed in the Signal-Book. In 1800 Captain Sir Home Popham devised a means of extending this: signals made with a special "Telegraph" flag refererred to a separate dictionary of numbered words and phrases.[3] A similar system was devised by Captain Marryat in 1817 "for the use of vessels employed in the merchant service".[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_maritime_signal_flags Semaphore Flags : Semaphore Flags is the system for conveying information at a distance by means of visual signals with hand-held flags, rods, disks, paddles, or occasionally bare or gloved hands. Information is encoded by the position of the flags; it is read when the flag is in a fixed position. Semaphores were adopted and widely used (with hand-held flags replacing the mechanical arms of shutter semaphores) in the maritime world in the 19th century.[citation needed] It is still used during underway replenishment at sea and is acceptable for emergency communication in daylight or, using lighted wands instead of flags, at night.[citation needed] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semaphore VIdeo produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
To A Mouse by Robert Burns ~ poem reading with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 To A Mouse by Robert Burns ~ poem reading with text copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions London 2000 video copyright to Robert Nichol 2012 all rights reserved
Views: 130291 ESL and Popular Culture
POEM ~ To Autumn by  John Keats with text
 
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Please see my POETRY playlists : English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Plus more playlists on my channel https://www.youtube.com/user/JustAudio2008/featured Charlotte Brontë (/ˈbrɒnti/; 21 April 1816 -- 31 March 1855) was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood and whose novels are English literature standards. She wrote Jane Eyre under the pen name Currer Bell. Charlotte was born in Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire in 1816, the third of six children, to Maria (née Branwell) and Patrick Brontë (formerly surnamed Brunty or Prunty), an Irish Anglican clergyman. In 1820 her family moved a few miles to the village of Haworth, where her father had been appointed Perpetual curate of St Michael and All Angels Church. Her mother died of cancer on 15 September 1821, leaving five daughters, Maria, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emily, Anne and a son Branwell to be taken care of by her sister, Elizabeth Branwell. In August 1824, Patrick Brontë sent Charlotte, Emily, Maria and Elizabeth to the Clergy Daughters' School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire. Charlotte maintained the school's poor conditions permanently affected her health and physical development and hastened the deaths of Maria (born 1814) and Elizabeth (born 1815), who died of tuberculosis in June 1825. After the deaths of her older sisters, her father removed Charlotte and Emily from the school.[1] Charlotte used the school as the basis for Lowood School in Jane Eyre. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_Bront%C3%AB Poetry,Poems,English Literature,English poetry,Famous Poems, Classic Poetry,ESL,TESOL,Teaching English,
Sonnet 5 ~ William Shakespeare ~ with text
 
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Sonnet 5 ~ William Shakespeare ~ with text copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions 2012 SONNET 5 Those hours, that with gentle work did frame The lovely gaze where every eye doth dwell, Will play the tyrants to the very same And that unfair which fairly doth excel: For never-resting time leads summer on To hideous winter and confounds him there; Sap check'd with frost and lusty leaves quite gone, Beauty o'ersnow'd and bareness every where: Then, were not summer's distillation left, A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, Beauty's effect with beauty were bereft, Nor it nor no remembrance what it was: But flowers distill'd though they with winter meet, Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet. Notes gaze (2): object gazed at. unfair (4): deprive of beauty (the only place it is used by Shakespeare). fairly (4): beautifully and legitimately. confounds (6): destroys. checked (7): halted. distillation (9): perfume distilled from flowers. bereft (11): lost. Leese (14): lose (again, the only place it is used by Shakespeare).
Walt Whitman Poem ~ O Captain ! My Captain !
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 "O Captain! My Captain!" is an extended metaphor poem written in 1865 by Walt Whitman, about the death of American president Abraham Lincoln. "O Captain! My Captain!" is a poem written by Walt Whitman in 1865. The poem is classified as an elegy because it is a mourning poem that was written in the memory of someone. The poem was written to honor Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States. Walt Whitman was born in 1819 and died in 1892, so he lived through the American Civil War. Being born close to the founding of the country, he knew people that were a part of the American Revolution. Through this he experienced the unification and division of the United States. Walt Whitman was extremely patriotic and wrote many poems about the prominence of America. He also wrote poems about urging people to fight for what is right. The main political and social issue during Whitman's time was slavery and the rights of African Americans. Whitman was self-described as the poet of America and, during the Civil War, the Union. Whitman wanted to see the end of slavery; this was his hope for America. However, it broke his heart to see the nation fighting. He admired Abraham Lincoln immensely because of his political standpoint of universal equality as stated in the constitution. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_Captain!_My_Captain! The captain in the poem refers to Abraham Lincoln who is the captain of the ship; this represents the United States of America. The first line establishes a happy mood as it addresses the captain. The phrase "our fearful trip is done" is talking about the end of the Civil War. The next line references the ship, America, and how it has "weathered every rack", meaning America has braved the tough storm of the Civil War, and "the prize we sought", the end of slavery, "is won". The following line expresses a mood of jubilation of the Union winning the war as it says "the people all exulting"; however, the next line swiftly shifts the mood when it talks of the grimness of the ship, and the darker side of the war. Many lost their lives in the American Civil War, and although the prize that was sought was won, the hearts still ache amidst the exultation of the people. The repetition of heart in line five calls attention to the poet's vast grief and heartache because the Captain has bled and lies still, cold, and dead (lines six through eight). This is no doubt referencing the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Whitman's sorrow for the death of his idol.
Learn 5 Oceans of the Earth ~ Quick Guide
 
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Please see my POPULAR ENGLISH WORDS playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-rmNKGsfF5XEUWvibWVk9lhhWciGFRpr The surface of the planet is approximately 71% water and contains (5) five oceans, including the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific and Southern. An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός (Okeanos); the World Ocean of classical antiquity[1]) is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere.[2] On Earth, an ocean is one or all of the major divisions of the planet's World Ocean -- which are, in descending order of area, the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern (Antarctic), and Arctic Oceans.[3][4] The word sea is often used interchangeably with "ocean" in American English but, strictly speaking, a sea is a body of saline water (generally a division of the World Ocean) that land partly or fully encloses.[5] Earth is the only planet that is known to have an ocean (or any large amounts of open liquid water). Saline water covers approximately 72% of the planet's surface (~3.6x108 km2) and is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas, with the ocean covering approximately 71% of the Earth's surface.[6] The ocean contains 97% of the Earth's water, and oceanographers have stated that only 5% of the World Ocean has been explored.[6] The total volume is approximately 1.3 billion cubic kilometres (310 million cu mi)[7] with an average depth of 3,682 metres (12,080 ft).[8] The ocean principally comprises Earth's hydrosphere and therefore is integral to all known life, forms part of the carbon cycle, and influences climate and weather patterns. It is the habitat of 230,000 known species, although much of the ocean's depths remain unexplored, and over two million marine species are estimated to exist.[9] The origin of Earth's oceans remains unknown; oceans are believed to have formed in the Hadean period and may have been the impetus for the emergence of life. Extraterrestrial oceans may be composed of water or other elements and compounds. The only confirmed large stable bodies of extraterrestrial surface liquids are the lakes of Titan, although there is evidence for the existence of oceans elsewhere in the Solar System. Early in their geologic histories, Mars and Venus are theorized to have had large water oceans. The Mars ocean hypothesis suggests that nearly a third of the surface of Mars was once covered by water, and a runaway greenhouse effect may have boiled away the global ocean of Venus. Compounds such as salts and ammonia dissolved in water lower its freezing point, so that water might exist in large quantities in extraterrestrial environments as brine or convecting ice. Unconfirmed oceans are speculated beneath the surface of many dwarf planets and natural satellites; notably, the ocean of Europa is believed to have over twice the water volume of Earth. The Solar System's gas giant planets are also believed to possess liquid atmospheric layers of yet to be confirmed compositions. Oceans may also exist on exoplanets and exomoons, including surface oceans of liquid water within a circumstellar habitable zone. Ocean planets are a hypothetical type of planet with a surface completely covered with liquid seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean
Views: 226029 ESL and Popular Culture
W B Yeats  Poem ~ An Irish Airman Foresees His Death with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 An Irish Airman Foresees His Death is a poem by Irish poet William Butler Yeats written in 1918 and first published in the Macmillan edition of The Wild Swans at Coole in 1919.[1] The poem is a soliloquy given by an aviator in the First World War in which the poet describes the circumstances surrounding his imminent death. The poem is a work that discusses the role of Irish soldiers fighting for the United Kingdom during a time when they were trying to establish independence for Ireland. Wishing to show restraint from publishing political poems during the height of the war, Yeats withheld publication of the poem until after the conflict had ended see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Irish_Airman_Foresees_His_Death
TOMMY  by Rudyard Kipling poem with text
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 TOMMY. by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) links http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudyard_Kipling Toomy Atkins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Atkins Tommy Atkins (often just Tommy) is slang for a common soldier in the British Army. It was already well established in the 19th century, but is particularly associated with World War I. It can be used as a term of reference, or as a form of address. German soldiers would call out to "Tommy" across no man's land if they wished to speak to a British soldier. French and Commonwealth troops would also call British soldiers "Tommies". In more recent times, the term Tommy Atkins has been used less frequently, although the name "Tom" is occasionally still heard, especially with regard to paratroopers.
The Lady of Shalott  ~ poem with text
 
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POEM COPYRIGHT ROBERT NICHOL AUDIO PRODUCTIONS LONDON 2001 William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Plus more playlists on my channel https://www.youtube.com/user/JustAudio2008/featured Poetry,Poems,English Literature,English poetry,Famous Poemst, Classic Poetry,ESL,TESOL,Teaching English, The Lady of Shalott is a Victorian ballad by the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson Like his other early poems -- "Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere" and "Galahad" -- the poem recasts Arthurian subject matter loosely based on medieval sources.
The Laboratory by Robert Browning
 
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PLease see my Poetry Playlists William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 The Laboratory - poem by Robert Browning "The Laboratory" is a poem and monologue by Robert Browning. The poem was first published in June 1844 in Hood's Magazine and Comic Miscellany, and later Dramatic Romances and Lyrics in 1845. This poem, set in seventeenth century France, is the monologue of a woman speaking to an apothecary as he prepares a poison, which she intends to use to kill her rival in love. It was inspired by the life of Marie Madeleine Marguerite D'Aubray, marquise de Brinvilliers (1630-1676), who poisoned her father and two brothers and planned to poison her husband.[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Laboratory Robert Browning (7 May 1812 -- 12 December 1889) was an English poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Browning video produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
ENGLISH ALPHABET English ABC.. BRITISH ENGLISH -  Speak English, Learn English,
 
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BEST BUY Talk English: The Secret To Speak English Like A Native In 6 Months For Busy People https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0998163201/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0998163201&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=a38b47dd23cc310dcbd8eec1761bae4c Please see my POPULAR ENGLISH WORDS playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-rmNKGsfF5XEUWvibWVk9lhhWciGFRpr Speak English, Learn English, Videos of Colours, Fruits, Vegetables, Clothing, Jobs, and many more of the Most Used English Words in simple clear video form. NEW FAST READ VERSION HERE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm3S6dtfpwE&feature=youtu.be ALPHABET in English ABC to Z AudioProductions 2007 Copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions London 2006 Created by RNaudioproductions for LearnFree2007
Views: 3437331 ESL and Popular Culture
Phonetic Numbers ~ Airtraffic / Military / NATO
 
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Phonetic Numbers ~ Airtraffic / Military / NATO copyright Robert Nichol AudioProductions The NATO phonetic alphabet, also known as the NATO spelling alphabet, ICAO phonetic or spelling alphabet, ITU phonetic alphabet, and the international radiotelephony spelling alphabet, is the most widely used spelling alphabet. Though often called "phonetic alphabets", spelling alphabets do not have any association with phonetic transcription systems like the International Phonetic Alphabet. Instead, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) alphabet assigns code words to digits and acrophonically to the letters of the English alphabet (Alfa for A, Bravo for B, etc.) so that critical combinations of letters and numbers can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially when navigation or persons might be endangered due to transmission static. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NATO_phonetic_alphabet Phonetic numbers "radio telephony" military radio pilots police Airforce NATO HowTo army
Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poem ~ My Heart and I
 
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Please see my POETRY playlists : English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 William Wordsworth Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB3FEB3BB8185307E William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Plus more playlists on my channel https://www.youtube.com/user/JustAudio2008/featured Elizabeth Barrett Browning (/ˈbraʊnɪŋ/; 6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861) was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era. Her poetry was widely popular in both Britain and the United States during her lifetime.[1] Born in County Durham, the eldest of 12 children, Browning was educated at home. She wrote poetry from around the age of six and this was compiled by her mother, comprising what is now one of the largest collections extant of juvenilia by any English writer. At 15 Browning became ill, suffering from intense head and spinal pain for the rest of her life, rendering her frail. She took laudanum for the pain, which may have led to a lifelong addiction and contributed to her weak health. In the 1830s Barrett's cousin John Kenyon introduced her to prominent literary figures of the day such as William Wordsworth, Mary Russell Mitford, Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Thomas Carlyle. Browning's first adult collection The Seraphim and Other Poems was published in 1838. During this time she contracted a disease, possibly tuberculosis, which weakened her further. Living at Wimpole Street, in London, Browning wrote prolifically between 1841 and 1844, producing poetry, translation and prose. She campaigned for the abolition of slavery and her work helped influence reform in child labour legislation. Her prolific output made her a rival to Tennyson as a candidate for poet laureate on the death of Wordsworth. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Barrett_Browning
Learn The Months Of The Year In English -  Speak English, Learn English,
 
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Learn The Months Of The Year In English Speak English, Learn English,
Views: 179220 ESL and Popular Culture
Stonehenge prehistoric monument
 
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PLEASE see my UK Places to visit Playlist here https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL42389B6659B65580 for mor great historic England,Wales and Scotland http://www.stonehenge.co.uk/ Age estimated at 3100 BC Location Wiltshire, UK OS Reference SU 122 422 Type of stone Bluestone, Sarsen, Welsh Sandstone Worship Lunar, Solar Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, about 2 miles (3.2 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is the remains of a ring of standing stones set within earthworks. It is in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.[1] Archaeologists believe it was built anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC. Radiocarbon dating in 2008 suggested that the first stones were raised between 2400 and 2200 BC,[2] whilst another theory suggests that bluestones may have been raised at the site as early as 3000 BC.[3][4][5] The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 in a co-listing with Avebury Henge. It is a national legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage, while the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.[6][7] Archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2008 indicates that Stonehenge could have been a burial ground from its earliest beginnings.[8] The dating of cremated remains found on the site indicate that deposits contain human bone from as early as 3000 BC, when the ditch and bank were first dug. Such deposits continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years.[9] The site is a place of religious significance and pilgrimage in Neo-Druidry. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge Stonehenge,visit Stonehenge,England,Wiltshire,Burial Mound,Druid,Druids,Summer solstice
Views: 106929 ESL and Popular Culture
Porphyria's Lover by Robert Browning
 
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"Porphyria's Lover" is a poem by Robert Browning and it was first published as "Porphyria" in the January 1836 issue of Monthly Repository. Browning later republished it in Dramatic Lyrics (1842) paired with "Johannes Agricola in Meditation" under the title "Madhouse Cells." The poem did not receive its definitive title until 1863. "Porphyria's Lover" is Browning's first ever short dramatic monologue, and also the first of his poems to examine abnormal psychology.[1] Although its initial publication passed nearly unnoticed and it received little critical attention in the nineteenth century, the poem is now heavily anthologised and much studied. In the poem, a man strangles his lover -- Porphyria -- with her hair; "... and all her hair / In one long yellow string I wound / Three times her little throat around, / And strangled her." Porphyria's lover then talks of the corpse's blue eyes, golden hair, and describes the feeling of perfect happiness the murder gives him. Although he winds her hair around her throat 3 times in order to throttle her, the woman never cries out. The poem contains different rhyming patterns which use letters. The letter formation is A,B,A,B,B,C,D,C,D,D and so on. This goes by the ending, rhyming letters on the ending word of each line. A possible inspiration for the poem is John Wilson's "Extracts from Gosschen's Diary", a lurid account of a murder published in Blackwood's Magazine in 1818. Browning's friend and fellow poet Bryan Procter acknowledged basing his 1820 "Marcian Colonna" on this source, but added a new detail; after the murder, the killer sits up all night with his victim http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porphyria%27s_Lover Robert Browning (7 May 1812 -- 12 December 1889) was an English poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Browning picture :Porphyria's Lover painted by Dante Gabriel Rossetti: Lady Lilith (1867), Metropolitan Museum of Art (model: Fanny Cornforth). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dante_Gabriel_Rossetti video produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
Clouds -Cloud Types - Meteorology
 
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Clouds are formed in Earth's atmosphere when water evaporates into vapor from oceans, lakes, ponds, and even streams and rivers; or by evapotranspiration over moist areas of Earth's land surface. The vapor rises up into colder areas of the atmosphere due to convective, orographic, or frontal lifting. The water vapor attaches itself to condensation nuclei which could be anything from dust to microscopic particles of salt and debris. Once the vapor has been cooled to saturation, the cloud becomes visible. All weather-producing clouds form in the troposphere, the lowest major layer of the atmosphere. However very small amounts of water vapor can be found higher up in the stratosphere and mesosphere and may condense into very thin clouds if the air temperatures are sufficiently cold. One branch of meteorology is focused on the study of nephology or cloud physics. more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cloud_types The study of meteorology is important to a pilot as weather is an issue that affects not only aircraft performance but also flight safety. In this CD we will examine basic met theory enabling you to develop an understanding of the principles involved and how weather can affect your flying activities. A sound knowledge of the theories behind meteorology will help you, as a pilot, to make good decisions based on the forecasts and reports available. Meteorology,cloud,clouds,cloud names,stratocumuliform,stratiform,PPL, learn to fly,weather,cloud formation, Cloud Types : Meteorology
Views: 145177 ESL and Popular Culture
Sir Patrick Spens Ballad WithText
 
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"Sir Patrick Spens" is one of the most popular of the Child Ballads and is of Scottish origin The story as told in the ballad has multiple versions, but they all follow the same basic plot. The King of Scotland has called for the greatest sailor in the land to command a ship for a royal errand. The name "Sir Patrick Spens" is mentioned by a courtier, and the king despatches a letter. Sir Patrick, though honoured to receive a royal commission, is dismayed at being put to sea in the dead of winter, clearly realising this voyage could well be his last. Versions differ somewhat at this point. Some indicate that a storm sank the ship in the initial crossing, thus ending the ballad at this point, while many have Sir Patrick safely reaching Norway. In Norway tension arises between the Norwegian lords and the Scots, who are accused of being a financial burden on the king. Sir Patrick, taking offence, leaves the following day. Nearly all versions, whether they have the wreck on the outward voyage or the return, relate the bad omen of seeing "the new mune late yestreen, with the auld mune in her airms", and modern science agrees the tides would be at maximum force at that time. The winter storms have the best of the great sailor, sending him and the Scottish lords to the bottom of the sea. Many versions have been passed down over the years.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Patrick_Spens video produced and copyright to Robert Nichol 2013
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, ~ Shakespeare Sonnet 65 with text
 
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Shakespeare Sonnet 65 with text Since brass nor stone nor earth,
Beautiful Gothic Architecture
 
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PLEASE see my UK Places to visit Playlist here https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL42389B6659B65580 for mor great historic England,Wales and Scotland Beautiful Gothic Architecture Video by Robert Nichol music by John Mayfield. Gothic architecture is a style of architecture that flourished during the high and late medieval period. It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture. Originating in 12th-century France and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture was known during the period as "French work" (Opus Francigenum), with the term Gothic first appearing during the latter part of the Renaissance. Its characteristic features include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe. It is also the architecture of many castles, palaces, town halls, guild halls, universities and to a less prominent extent, private dwellings. It is in the great churches and cathedrals and in a number of civic buildings that the Gothic style was expressed most powerfully, its characteristics lending themselves to appeal to the emotions. A great number of ecclesiastical buildings remain from this period, of which even the smallest are often structures of architectural distinction while many of the larger churches are considered priceless works of art and are listed with UNESCO as World Heritage Sites. For this reason a study of Gothic architecture is largely a study of cathedrals and churches. A series of Gothic revivals began in mid-18th-century England, spread through 19th-century Europe and continued, largely for ecclesiastical and university structures, into the 20th century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_architecture Gothic Architecture,Gothic,Architecture,Gothic Art,medieval period,Renaissance architecture,Middle Ages (Event)
Famous Poem ~ To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell with text
 
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English Poetry Playlist herehttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3820309D7FE2EBD2 To His Coy Mistress is a metaphysical poem written by the English author and politician Andrew Marvell (1621--1678) either during or just before the Interregnum. This poem is considered one of Marvell's finest and is possibly the best recognized carpe diem poem in English. Although the date of its composition is not known, it may have been written in the early 1650s. At that time, Marvell was serving as a tutor to the daughter of the retired commander of the New Model Army, Sir Thomas Fairfax The speaker of the poem addresses a woman who has been slow to respond to his sexual advances. In the first stanza he describes how he would love her if he were to be unencumbered by the constraints of a normal lifespan. He could spend centuries admiring each part of her body and her resistance to his advances (i.e., coyness) would not discourage him. In the second stanza, he laments how short human life is. Once life is over, the speaker contends, the opportunity to enjoy one another is gone, as no one embraces in death. In the last stanza, the speaker urges the woman to requite his efforts, and argues that in loving one another with passion they will both make the most of the brief time they have to live. seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_His_Coy_Mistress William Shakespeare Sonnets https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0815F9D1255F14F0 Robert Browning Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HZoNgLETnSLjN07xOEsVRR Alfred, Lord Tennyson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA66B33D647FE39F7 Lewis Carroll https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA8FE8A7C3B73E9A Oscar Wilde Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL799319E6D9B99769 Rudyard Kipling https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FF29102EAEBA4E2 Robert Burns https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA230E795188C7F7D John Keats poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65A03A3A9BA0B915 Thomas Hardy Poetry and Stories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF49A6C2ADCCE3976 John Clare Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6G359eDgj8HBPTbhKre8C4D Emily and Anne Bronte Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EU0Bz0Ul-iOHrvhKciCnz3 Rupert Brooke Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HL-C9TM2a2a-2Q93Q9Jr9D D H Lawrence Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA5ED43A5287D5A46 Robert Louis Stevenson Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1D4FCCF50BC8D662 Edgar Allan Poe Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EwauZLvFO05hpgaoI23cqJ Walt Whitman Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6EFrM4I5vYVlFr912I7ac6I Robert Frost Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6HlQeZiglTIAgRvl0gBHxdP William Blake Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLg700EF7NB6FzPW38Spm9OzVIQ4rHNfpI Christina Rossetti Poetry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A456573D4C46480 Plus more playlists on my channel https://www.youtube.com/user/JustAudio2008/featured
UK Road signs pt2 - for driving test theory exam
 
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BUY OFFICIAL UK Highwaycode here https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0115533427/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0115533427&linkCode=am2&tag=allcastco-20&linkId=2f2ce7a4deeb0125a78603e6b87e5c20 best online PLEASE see my HIGHWAYCODE playlist http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL29435AA5F517A409 Highway Code -UK Road signs pt2 Signs you need to know for the Highway Code test. REAL road signs as seen from a car This demo is made for mobile phone screens so please click on the 'view smaller button' on the YouTube player to make the picture sharper, More to come including 'stopping distances' I hope they help, real sign posts have been used, filmed on location from my car. AudioProductions 2007 not BBC audio not Pearson Educational not Recorded Books teaching not Cambridge University Test not Open Learning not Linguaphone Not Oxford University Press not Bordas not Nelson Publishing - but Robert Nichol AudioProductions London ELT TEFL not BBC audio not Pearson Educational not Recorded Books teaching not Cambridge University Test not Open Learning not Linguaphone Not Oxford University Press not Bordas not Nelson Publishing - but Robert Nichol AudioProductions London ELT TEFL
Views: 139637 ESL and Popular Culture
Speak English, Learn English, - English Vocab  - Objects In The Kitchen
 
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English Vocab - Objects In The Kitchen Speak English, Learn English, Speak English, Learn English, TEFL , ELT, TESOL