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Videos uploaded by user “Memorial Sloan Kettering”
(English) How to Use Your Incentive Spirometer
 
02:51
This video from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center explains how to use your incentive spirometer, a device that can help improve breathing and clear secretions from the lungs after surgery. Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Immunotherapy: How It Works
 
01:21
PICI_animation
Views: 118226 Memorial Sloan Kettering
How to Shower Using Hibiclens
 
02:13
Learn about Using Hibiclens: https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/showering-hibiclens CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Meet Radiation Oncologist Nancy Lee | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
04:37
Learn more about our treatments for head and neck cancer: http://www.mskcc.org/headandneckcancers Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center radiation oncologist Nancy Lee gives patients with head and neck cancer new hope using a technology called IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy). Patient John McPeak and Dr. Lee describe how she used this targeted approach to completely eliminate a tumor at the base of his tongue, while also preserving both his speech and his quality of life. {partial transcript} My name is Nancy Lee. I’m an associate attending at the department of radiation and oncology focusing on head and neck cancer. John is a patient of mine. He was diagnosed with cancer involving the base of the tongue. When they found it, it had already metastasized over here. My cancer has four stages and I was in the fourth stage. So, that was rather exciting [laughs]. Patients, many times when they have cancer, they feel very nervous and they feel like they have a death sentence basically. When they come to see me, after explaining all the radiation, I give them hope because there is hope. Her focus was so intense and so warm that you couldn’t walk away from it. I remember saying to her that I was worried about the quality of life afterwards, particularly the fact that since the cancer is centered here, and all of my business is done talking, you’ve got to save my voice. Don’t take away my voice and say ‘fine, you’re cured.’ She said, ‘you’re fine, I’m an artist.’
Total vs. Partial Thyroidectomy -- Sloan-Kettering
 
05:03
Factors such as a patient's age, tumor size, and lymph node involvement help determine the best surgical approach for thyroid cancer, says surgeon Ashok Shaha of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Lobectomy (removal of only one lobe of the thyroid gland) is usually best for patients with small tumors on one side of the thyroid. If the cancer has spread to both lobes, or if a patient is concerned that it could recur in the future, a complete thyroidectomy (removal of the entire gland), followed by radioactive iodine therapy, may be more appropriate. For more information, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/thyroidcancer
Suzanne's Story | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about Suzanne’s story: https://www.mskcc.org/suzanne Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering In 2011, Suzanne was diagnosed with small cell cervical cancer – an aggressive cervical cancer. In this short film directed by award-winning filmmaker David Gelb, see how science not only saved her life, but gave her the chance to create a new one. {partial transcript} I always wanted to have three kids. I had the two boys and desperately wanted a girl. I have four brothers and two sons, so my plan was to get married and immediately try to have a baby with Jimmy. Girl please! The first doctor, his exact words to me were: “So, I got the pathology report – there was some cancer there.” The first words out of my mouth were: “Wait – am I going to lose my hair? I’m getting married in four months and I need my hair.” Then I went to the next doctor who scared the hell out of me. Finally, I went to Sloan. I saw her in May that year and her wedding was in September. The specific type of cancer she had is called small cell carcinoma of the cervix, which is very rare. Five-year survival numbers are pretty low. She also wanted to have a child with Jimmy. I was going to do everything I could to make sure those things happened for her, but at the same time realized “man, I hope she’s around for this child.” Doctor Leitao’s first words out of his mouth were: “Don’t Google it.” I never listen, and I don’t know why I listened to him, but I did. I never Googled it. We did this unique procedure called a trachelectomy – it’s only done at a few institutions in the world – it’s for women who have certain types of cervical cancer. Instead of taking out the entire uterus, we take out the cervix itself. Unfortunately for that type of cancer, because of how aggressive it is, we can’t do that.
Views: 588860 Memorial Sloan Kettering
Diet and Lymphedema -- Sloan-Kettering
 
03:35
Maintaining the health of the lymphatic system following cancer treatment is one way to reduce the risk of lymphedema. Jeannette Zucker, a physical therapist and lymphedema specialist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, discusses how diet plays an important role in the prevention of lymphedema.
TV Commercial: Suzanne's Story | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn about Suzanne’s treatments: https://www.mskcc.org/suzanne Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering In 2011, Suzanne was diagnosed with an aggressive cervical cancer. This is her story.
Views: 257262 Memorial Sloan Kettering
More Science. Less Fear. | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our cancer treatments here: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering It’s time to change how the world treats cancer. Learn how we’re making what was impossible yesterday, possible today.
What to Expect on the Day of Surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
 
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This video will give you an idea of what to expect when you come to Memorial Sloan Kettering’s main hospital on the day of your surgery.
Ovarian Cancer Symptoms, Detection & Screening | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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To learn more about ovarian cancer treatments, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/ovariancancer Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment For the majority of women, there are no effective methods to screen for ovarian cancer. Memorial Sloan Kettering experts discuss how important it is for women to carefully monitor any changes that occur in their bodies that might be symptoms of ovarian cancer. The four most common symptoms of ovarian cancer are bloating; pelvic or abdominal pain; difficulty eating or feeling full quickly; and urinary symptoms (urgency or frequency). {partial transcript} Let’s start off with ovarian cancer. We hear a lot about it being particularly deadly because it tends not to cause specific symptoms. Let’s talk about ovary cancer detection, screening, who is at risk and what should we do with it. Doctor Hensley, would you like to start off? Sure, ovary cancer does have a reputation of being difficult to diagnose in early stage. Around three quarters of women diagnosed with ovary cancer are in stage three or stage four at the time of diagnosis. By that we mean the cancer has left the ovaries and spread into the upper abdomen or invaded into distant organs like the liver of the lung. Also the chances of being cured for cancer is linked to the stage in ovary cancer. If the cancer is diagnosed in early stage, then the chances of cure is greater.
Air Travel and its Impact on Lymphedema -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Air travel provides an increased risk of developing lymphedema. Jeannette Zucker, a physical therapist and lymphedema specialist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, discusses tactics to reduce the risk of lymphedema while flying.
Endometrial Cancer Symptoms & Prevention | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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To learn more about ovarian cancer treatments, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/ovariancancer CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment The majority of endometrial cancers are found in the earliest, most treatable stages because women report abnormal postmenopausal or irregular bleeding to their doctor. Memorial Sloan Kettering experts discuss the ways that endometrial cancer can be prevented, as well as what treatment options exist for women who develop this type of cancer. {partial transcript} We have segued into our other gynecologic cancers. Dr. Hensley, can you tell me if uterine cancer is primarily endometrial cancer? Is it more common that cervical cancer? Most women, when they say they have uterine cancer, in general they mean they had endometrial cancer. The uterus is the whole organ. The lining of the center of the uterus is called the endometrium. The endometrium is glandular tissue that grows and sloths. It grows relatively more rapid turnover that are more prone to cancer and also because the endometrium has access to the outside. Women can present with bleeding after menopause, post-menopausal bleeding. It can be a signal of endometrial cancer.
MGUS and Smoldering Myeloma
 
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Ola Landgren, Chief of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Myeloma Service, explains disorders that predispose a person to myeloma and how they are treated.
Meet Endometrial Cancer Survivor Alice Edwards | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our treatments for endometrial and other uterine cancers here: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Telling her two daughters that she had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus) was hard for Brooklyn, NY minister Alice Edwards. But her prayers for a compassionate doctor were answered when the family called the Physician Referral Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and found Carol Brown, a gynecologic oncologist and surgeon. Edwards underwent a course of treatment that included surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation quite beautifully, Brown says admiringly. {partial transcript} Back in June, I realized that something was happening with my body that wasn’t normal. I went to a doctor and she said ‘you had Endometrial cancer.’ I said ‘What is that?’ And she said cancer of the lining of the uterus. That punch hits you in your stomach that you have cancer. Sister Edwards has been such a part of this church. I shutter to think of what this church would be like without her presence and her contributions. I told my two daughters together. You know being a mother you hate to tell your child something that you know is going to hurt them. Went upstairs to my room and just laid on the floor for a while to get myself together. You start thinking about, oh my god, what happens if she passes away. And I just kind of felt like what the best place she could be at to be treated. I wanted a compassionate doctor. Terry was praying for the same thing. We wanted a doctor that will sit and listen to her cause she has a lot to say. And my sister Peggy called a physician referral service and that’s how she was able to get me into Sloane-Kettering. The day of my consultation about ten of us went. And they took me in there to get my pressure taken and stuff. And all of a sudden I heard all this laughing and clapping out there, they’re making too much noise, this is a hospital. And then Doctor Brown walked in and said “Hi, I’m Doctor Brown.”
Wayne Quashie Discusses Patient Centered Care | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our patient centered care at: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering For Wayne Quashie, great care isn't just a matter of having strong clinical skills; it's also about being able to connect with patients and their families on a personal level. As a clinical nurse specialist in the neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, orthopedics, and pain and palliative care units at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, he strives to impart his commitment to other nurses. {partial transcript} My name is Wayne Quashie and I’m a clinical nurse specialist on the neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, orthopedics and pain and palliative care floor and my role really is on the educator and chemical resource for all the staff on the unit with the main diagnosis of cancer you've already experienced the loss, a loss of health and sometimes a loss of dreams. We deal with the person from that initial loss of that cancer diagnosis and then work with them through the trajectory of the disease and sometimes you may have to get to that point where it's the last moments of life. I’m Dee, I’m another nurse on the floor. I’ve worked on the oncology floor for three years now. Wayne reminds you that you're here for patient care. You know we never lose focus of that here. I always say to myself if it was me or my family member I would want them to be taken care of like this. The thing that most of the nurses learn very quickly is the technical part the technical skills, that's pretty straightforward. You learn how to hang blood you learn how to give meds, you learn all that stuff, that’s very easy. Now the real work begins they still have to learn from the get go how do you work with family members that are undergoing illness, because the families undergoing the illness. We’re not only treating the patients we’re treating the family too. For us to really do what we do we have to really be compassionate and be able to connect when I going to patients rooms and I can see the pictures on the wall. To us Mr Smith is this patient. But to the family members Mr Smith is that person on the wall that's drinking a Pina Colada on vacation. In the face of illness, there’s no way but to really connect with them and really share in their joys and share in their sorrows.
IGRT: Precise and Powerful Radiation Therapy -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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One of the most important advances in radiation oncology in the past decade is the development of image guided radiation therapy or IGRT, says Memorial Sloan-Kettering radiation oncologist Josh Yamada, MD. This highly sophisticated technique enables radiation oncologists to precisely sculpt multiple radiation beams to the contours of a tumor, thereby sparing nearby normal tissue. The higher doses possible in IGRT also have a greater chance of killing tumors, according to Dr. Yamada.
Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our cancer treatments here: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Widespread screening for prostate cancer means that men are now often diagnosed with the disease before it is detectable by digital-rectal exam. This means that doctors are treating a different, earlier-stage disease than they were 10 years ago, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center specialists say. For this reason the results of all treatment approaches are better in today's patients. {partial transcript} In other words, the studies and the numbers that we’ve seen, the patients themselves have selected which direction they want to go (that may introduce a little bias into the numbers). But we have thousands and thousands of cases that give us an idea. It shows that we’re looking at, generally, a ten to fifteen year survival rate. As we follow this out and I guess part of the difficulty is that prostate cancer is pretty slow growing. So we have to follow these men for a very long period of time before we start seeing a difference between radiation therapy and surgery. It’s hard to make a career in the natural history of prostate cancer because it basically takes your career. You take someone with a localized prostate cancer and you want to see if they are going to die of prostate cancer, you’ll need to follow them for twenty to twenty-five years. We have used intermediate end points and different ways of assessment and have found that just because someone has a recurrence of prostate cancer after a typical radiation, some times surgery… I’m just joking, it’s not a death sentence, and they do not all behave the same way. Their life expectancy is still measured in many years and they may not all behave on as if they’re going to have a rapid course.
About Lymphedema and its Causes -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Lymphedema is an accumulation of lymphatic fluid (lymph stasis) that causes an abnormal swelling of an extremity. Jeannette Zucker, a physical therapist and lymphedema specialist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, gives an overview of the causes of lymphedema, including cancer treatment.
How to Care for Irritated Skin Around Your Stoma
 
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How to Care for Irritated Skin Around Your Stoma Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
How to Change Your Ostomy Appliance
 
05:49
Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Lymph Nodes in Thyroid Cancer -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Unlike in many other cancers, the spread of thyroid cancer to the lymph nodes has very little impact on survival in most patients, say thyroid cancer experts at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Lymph nodes that look suspicious may be removed during thyroid surgery, but in most cases, this does not affect the outcome of treatment. For more information, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/thyroidcancer
What is Brachytherapy?
 
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Learn why brachytherapy is the best form of treatment for some cancers.
How to Remove Your Urinary (Foley) Catheter
 
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How to Remove Your Urinary (Foley) Catheter Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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To learn more about ovarian cancer treatments, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/ovariancancer Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Memorial Sloan Kettering experts discuss the different treatment options for women with endometrial cancer. {partial transcript} What about therapy after surgery for uterine cancer? Is it still the same chemotherapy used in peritoneal chemotherapy in this case? We have learned so much about endometrial cancer. We used to think it as one disease, but we have learned that even within a stage, and the cancer is confined only to the uterus and has not spread to the lymph nodes, there are differences in prognosis that depend on how the cancer looks underneath the microscope, which is called histology. We are learning to understand in different molecular features that endometrial cancer. We are even learning to type endometrial cancers between those that we feel are more hormonally driven, Type 1 cancers, versus those that are not hormonally driven. They express different molecular markers and look a little different under the microscope. With the help of a good expert pathologist, we try to decide what is the risk for this endometrial cancer.
(English) How to Care for Your Jackson Pratt® Drainage System
 
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This video from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center shows how to use your Jackson Pratt® drainage system. Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Vascular Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Prostate Tumors
 
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Urologic surgeon Jonathan Coleman discusses vascular targeted photodynamic (VTP) therapy for delivering intravenous TOOKAD® to destroy prostate tumors and the blood vessels that support them.
MicroRNAs in the Development and Treatment of Cancer | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our cancer treatments: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Cancer biologist Andre Ventura explains how his lab uses genetically engineered mouse models to understand how cancer works, why we get cancer, and how his research helps discover new targets for cancer therapy. {partial transcript} What I would like to do right now is bring up one of the stars of tonight, Dr. Andre Ventura. I told the three of them that I would not read aloud their bios, since it’s in the handout provided. You can read about all the cool things that they have done and all the things that they’re distinguished for. I want to give just a little introduction to you all about why Andre’s work is so important. About ten to fifteen years ago, we became to appreciate their biologist evolutionary process that evolved from very simple molecules to become organized cells. We needed to know what was the first molecule that really mattered and started to create life. That molecule by all estimates is an RNA molecule. That started a change in all of our thinking about biology, which is that we used to think of RNA as this very simple information transfer between critical information stored in the DNA and your cells. Tags: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, micro RNA, cancer biology, cancer research, cancer therapy, RNA molecule, genomics, what is cancer, cancer treatments, oncogenic, miRNA, Andrea Ventura, stem cell research
Jack’s Story | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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In 2004, two year old Jack Demers was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. At the time, survival rates for this type of pediatric cancer were very low. In this short film, directed by award-winning filmmaker David Gelb, see how MSK created a treatment plan for Jack, who is now a teenager and living his dreams of being a big brother and playing basketball. See Jack's story at: https://www.mskcc.org/experience/hear-from-patients/jack Learn about Neuroblastoma: https://www.mskcc.org/pediatrics/cancer-care/types/neuroblastoma CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Surgical Treatment of Melanoma -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Melanoma is the fifth most common type of cancer and is more aggressive than other types of skin cancer. As skin cancer expert Daniel Coit of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center explains, however, it can usually be cured with surgery when found early. Coit also describes a procedure called sentinel lymph node mapping, in which the first lymph node that a tumor cell might spread to (called the sentinel node) is removed for biopsy. If the sentinel node does not show tumor cells, further surgery is likely unnecessary. For more information, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/skincancer
Jessica's Story
 
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Jessica Tar feared her cancer of the front part of tongue diagnosis would be the end of her acting and singing career. Memorial Sloan Kettering head and neck surgeon Jatin Shah eliminated the tumor helping Jessica continue to pursue her dream.
Gleason Score & Prostate Cancer Treatments | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment Prostate cancer patients are considered high- or low-risk in part based on their Gleason score. Doctors use this tool to determine whether a patient's first treatment should be surgery or radiation, specialists at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center say. {partial transcript} Let’s say we’ve got an elevated PSA – went for a biopsy and now have been diagnosed with prostate cancer. What I think most men and most people in the audience are interested in hearing is what to do next: Do I do surgery or do I choose radiation? Where do I go from here? Let’s talk about some of the pros and cons of surgery. It used to be recommended that surgery was more for younger men and disease confined to the prostate? We certainly reserve surgery for men that have a ten-year life expectancy at least. Men with less than a ten-year life expectancy can be probably treated in other ways that are much less difficult to go through. In the end, surgery is an assault; it basically is an operation that one has to go through. There is a hospital stay. There are catheters. Simply put, there is a lot a person has to go through with an operation, that if a man does not have a reasonable life expectancy, it is probably not worth going through. That’s not always true for individual patients, but most men who have less than a ten-year life expectancy will be treated with some other modality. A ten-year life expectancy of someone is now age 75, so it’s not as though there should be an age cut off, per se…
Meet Surgeon Daniel Coit
 
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Surgeon Daniel G. Coit – who cares for patients with melanoma, gastric cancer, and sarcomas – discusses the specialized team approach to treating patients with rare cancers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering.
Graft-Versus-Host Disease
 
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Dr. Sergio Giralt talks about the role of the immune response in bone marrow transplantation.
Prostate Cancer Detection and Survival Rates | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our cancer treatments here: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Widespread screening for prostate cancer means that men are now often diagnosed with the disease before it is detectable by digital-rectal exam. This means that doctors are treating a different, earlier-stage disease than they were 10 years ago, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center specialists say. For this reason the results of all treatment approaches are better in today's patients. {partial transcript} In other words, the studies and the numbers that we’ve seen, the patients themselves have selected which direction they want to go (that may introduce a little bias into the numbers). But we have thousands and thousands of cases that give us an idea. It shows that we’re looking at, generally, a ten to fifteen year survival rate. As we follow this out and I guess part of the difficulty is that prostate cancer is pretty slow growing. So we have to follow these men for a very long period of time before we start seeing a difference between radiation therapy and surgery. It’s hard to make a career in the natural history of prostate cancer because it basically takes your career. You take someone with a localized prostate cancer and you want to see if they are going to die of prostate cancer, you’ll need to follow them for twenty to twenty-five years. We have used intermediate end points and different ways of assessment and have found that just because someone has a recurrence of prostate cancer after a typical radiation, some times surgery… I’m just joking, it’s not a death sentence, and they do not all behave the same way. Their life expectancy is still measured in many years and they may not all behave on as if they’re going to have a rapid course.
Basket Trials
 
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Basket trials test a drug or treatment that targets a specific genetic mutation. short description: For a long time we've described cancer according to where it occurs in the body, for example, the breast, lung, or prostate. Now, with genome mapping,
Understanding Lynch Syndrome: Facts and Statistics
 
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Clinical genetics expert Kenneth Offit gives an overview of Lynch syndrome, a genetic disorder that can cause colon and other cancers.
How Do People Get Cancer | Cancer Awareness | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our cancer treatments here: http://www.mskcc.org/morescience Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment Craig B. Thompson, President and CEO of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses how people get cancer and provides some new ways to think about cancer. {partial transcript} I’m Craig Thompson and I’m the president of Memorial Sloan Kettering and it’s my great pleasure to welcome you to this evening’s update on major trends in modern cancer research. I want to give you a little bit of background, this is the fifth year we’ve done this, we used to advertise to let you know that this was going to go on, we’ve stopped having to do that and we are in fact over capacity. So you guys have done a great job of word of mouth and giving us some feedback on how we can make this informative and useful for you. Brief moment of background on Memorial Sloan Kettering: we are first and foremost a hospital dealing with the disease cancer, but we have a tripartite mission in that we are not just interested in giving the best possible care at this moment for cancer, but actually understanding the disease in greater detail so we can deliver more effective and safer treatments over time and that goes through cancer research.
Wayne Quashie, Clinical Nurse Specialist
 
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MSKCC clinical nurse specialist Wayne Quashie says great care involves being able to connect with patients and families.
Overview of Esophageal Cancer -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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Every year 1.4 million people around the world are diagnosed with esophageal cancer, the majority of whom are from South America and China. Dr. David Ilson, a medical oncologist who specializes in esophageal cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, provides an overview of the disease, risk factors, and general treatment strategies. He also discusses Barrett's esophagus, one of the main risk factors for developing this form of cancer. Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
Neobladder Urinary Diversion Procedure
 
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Surgeon Bernard Bochner describes a procedure in which doctors reconstruct the bladder after bladder cancer surgery to restore urinary function.
Carl's Story | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about Carl’s story: https://www.mskcc.org/carl Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment In 2009, Carl Verdi, a former high school science teacher and principal, was diagnosed with a complex form of pancreatic cancer and biliary cancer. At the time, there was no standard treatment for this type of cancer. In this short film, directed by award-winning filmmaker David Gelb, see how science found a path forward, and let Carl get back to the life he loved.
Retinoblastoma Care at Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
03:03
Learn what it’s like to receive retinoblastoma care at Memorial Sloan Kettering.
Treating Local and Regional Esophageal Cancer -- Sloan-Kettering
 
19:24
In the US, chemotherapy and radiation followed by surgery are the standard of care for treating esophageal cancer. Dr. David Ilson, a medical oncologist who specializes in esophageal cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, describes staging, diagnosis, and treatment options for this form of cancer. Learn about MSK: https://www.mskcc.org CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
A Special Thank You from MSK’s Pediatric Patients
 
02:13
A Few of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s young patients say thank you to the center’s generous supporters.
Elizabeth’s Story | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
03:16
In 2015, Elizabeth Shelley was diagnosed with breast cancer. In this short film directed by award-winning filmmaker David Gelb, see how MSK provided Elizabeth with a treatment plan designed for her, that got her back to living the life she loves. Learn about Breast Cancer: https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/types/breast CONNECT WITH MSK Facebook: http://facebook.com/sloankettering Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Instagram: http://instagram.com/sloankettering Request an appointment at MSK by calling 800-525-2225 or online at: https://www.mskcc.org/appointments/request-appointment
New Treatment Paradigm for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma
 
05:39
MSKCC genitourinary cancer expert Robert Motzer discusses new treatment options for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.
The Importance of Skin Care in Reducing Development of Lymphedema
 
17:43
There are several risk factors to the development of lymphedema following cancer treatment. Jeannette Zucker, a physical therapist and lymphedema specialist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, discusses how to increase lymphatic flow and decrease inflammation.